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April 01, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAII.Al'

MV t!'Tt1 C h i 1Y i. i w.Ylw r r a..W .

'=-'-- - IN*4'1 1. V '' l 7!.M.54

THURSDAY, 1 APRIL 1965

5

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ARTS and LETTERS By Mark Sbobin
German Music Avant-Garde?

_..
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To Question Bowditeb Seeks Professor
U.S. Policies For New History Course

Elliot Carter, whom many con-
sider Anerica's finest composer,
is on campus for a concert of his
works ,tonight at ,Hill Auditorium.
Mr. Carter recently returned to
America after a year. as composer-
in-residence for the city of West
Berlin. In an interview .yesterday,
he said thatthe longer he stayed'
In Europe, the more he felt that
American music is more interest-
ing, The significant aspect of
American music Carter felt -is its
pluralism, which is in keeping
with American tradition.
In --:Berlin, .Carter- noted that
"Germany is very anxious to-make
progress in all artistic fields" in
order to: regain. its lost cultural
leadership. Since the recent deaths
of - Paul. Hindemith and Karl
Amadeus Hartmann, the German
government hasbeen encouraging
its young composers. As a result,
young composers such as Hans
Werner Henze receive an amazing
number ,of performances of their
works.
.The lack of performance possi-
bity in America for American
composers enables European com-
posers to become more well-known-
here while the Americans are
highly successful in Europe. One.
American composer that Carter
met in Berlin was able to get
thirty performances of his flute
concerto in Geitnany, while one
performance of the work would be
the limit in America.
European subsidization, Carter
feels, does lead to an unhealthy

domination by :.fads.
music, treated as . a
manages to develop
more stably.

American
stepchild,
somewhat

ing experience.
Being conservative in outlook, he
is anxious over the increasing
post-war American music. He feels
numbpr nf. ti i YI I 1 nUitinnc in

tler o1 rivlal compos onsin
In particular, Carter thinks that that avant-garde activities today
electronic music in Europe has are no d gfferent than they were
aimed at producing "a striking fifty years ago, and even contends
cultural effect," while American that many far-out compositions
electronic composers have tried recreate- the nineteenth-century
to approach the medium more sentimentalh Americana of the
seriously. However, Carter rates "Dying Poet" and "Flight of the
most electronic music as "either Cyuckoo"' tradition.
unintelligible or primitive." I In terms of his own work, Carter
aims either at simple imitation of n tersted in the Caetr
ris not interested in the electronic
nturao.currenceirey nattep-smedium due to the complexity and
to create an entirely new listen- length of time involved in switch-
. ing to a radically new medium.
His new major composition, the
' Third String Quartet, will appear
next year at the opening of the
new Juilliard thSchool of Music
building at Lincoln Center in New
York.

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The second Seminar on Con- Prof. John Bowditch, cha'rman Thomas Maher. Grad, who ini-
gress and American Foreign Policy of the history department said tiated the petitioning said, such
will be held in Washington under i sterday that he was "interested a course would provide a general
the sponsorship of the Washing- in trying to appoint someone to awareness on how technology ef-
ton Friends Meeting from July 1 teach in the area of history of fects socio-economic change, and
to August 23. During the seminar technology." named four schools which had
the 15 students selected to parti- This came in response to a pe- programs in the subject.
cipate will extensively interview tition sent by eight students who Bowditch, however, pointed out
congressmen and senators on areas asked that such a course be in- that while the history department
of foreign policy such as China troduced because "innovations in had been interested in such a
policy, the Berlin situation and technology have directly spawned course for a long time, there was
the effects of cutbacks in defense sweeping socio-economic changes." no one in the department at the
spending. Only juniors, seniors, They explained in their petition present time who would consider
and first year graduate students that "in our fast moving society, himself really trained to inauger-
are eligible. man's intimate interaction with ate such a course.
The cost will be $150 and-i technology demands that he equip "Up until now we have been
Tand -- himself with an understanding working on getting someone to
cludes two meals a day at Wash- of the complex forces which arise teach a course in the area o
ington International House. from this interaction. social science history.

'v

-Daily-Pat Murphy

MICHIFISH

Michifish synchronized swimmers shown practicing for their
water show, "Patterns in Culture," to be presented April 1, 2, and
3 at the Women's Pool. Each of the routines will portray a specific
piece of sculpture. Highlights will include a solo by Lucia Kam-
inski, '65 Grad, a boys' comedy number, and a co-ed duet.

CURRICULUM:
Law School Revises Course Credits

ELLIOT CARTER

. ....

:---a.

r

Today: 4:10 P.M. Arena Theatre
Promptly Frieze Building
DEDL i1' GALORE FOR TWO OR MOREj
by Eugene lonesco

By PETER SARASOHN
Freshmen arriving at the Law
School in the fall will be the first
class to benefit from a reorga-
nization of the number of credit-
hours allotted to each basic course.
The change was made on the
recommendation of the standing
Curriculum Committee.
The first major change was re-
ducing the Contracts course from
four credit-hours per semester to
three credit-hours. The extra hour
will be reallocated to the Civil-
Procedure course which will now1
be three credit-hours.-
"Thre is no reduction in the
amount of work required of
freshmen, only the allocation of
credit-hours to contract and civil,
subjects will now be the same,"
Prof. Luke K. Cooperrider of the'
Law School and chairman of the
Curriculum. Committee, -said re-
cently.

Another revision that has been lengthy subject to do instead of
in effect for the first time this the previous series of specialized
year, is changing the one credit- projects. The one semester class
hour, two-semester sequence in will thus be smaller. Indications
legal writing to a two credit- so far are that the course is
hour, one-semester course. This working successfully.
change only effects second year The revision is the result of
students. a recommendation by a faculty
"This will make the course mor.member to study the ways and
manageable mak the in ors ir means to give students additional
manageable to the instructors irtann nlgwitn.
terms of time and student-fp training in legal writing.
ulty contact," Cooperrider said. Some students, however, re-
The students will only have one ceive their training through par-
ticipation in an extracurricular
activity which gives them the nec-
A essary practice and they can then
A eros 1be excused from the required
course; An example of this is the
Case Club program or working on
the Michigan Law Review.
The Curriculum Committee re-
ceives recommendations from fac-
THURSDAY, APRIL 1 ulty and students and drafts pro-
3:15 p.m.-Prof. F. Feldbrugge, p6sals to present to the faculty

A FULL MOON IN MARCH
by W. B. Yeats,

'1
1"

University of Leiden, and
J. A. Cohen of Harvard
cl .L.. -I ... 7 - .. .... 4 { .. -4'

Prof. committee which then acts on the
Law recommendations.

Department of Speech
Student Laborotor-y Thewre
Admission Free'

;.;'

The GilbertI

pi

1

& Sullivan Society
resents
Ylt,>
nen

School will speak on "Substantive
Criminal Law in the Soviet Union
Need Students and Communist China" in 120,
Hutchins Hall.
Loinmttee4:10 p.m. -. Kenneth Cragg of
For Com m ittee S. Augustine's College, Canter-
bury, Kent, England, will speak
The Student Advisory Commit- on "The Mystery of the Quran
tee for the residential college is; (Koran): Its Contemporary Rele-
£cnsidering ways to fill vacated vance" in the Multipurpose Rm.
positoions on its committee for the of the UGLI.
suinmer and fall after three or 4:10 p.m. -- Betty Chmaj of
four present members leave the Wayne State University and the
Un-iversity. Dorothy Ashby Trio for Detroit's
If, the committee decides that it Cafe Gourmet will speak on "What
wi1 remain the same size, two Makes Jazz American" in the'
suggestions have been made to im- Union ballroom.
plemet the appointments. One is .*7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
to 'ask for volunteers by an ad- will present W. C. Field in "The
vertisement in The Daily, and the Bank Dick" in Architecture Aud.
other suggestion is to let present 8 p.m.-"Patterns In Sculpture"
members pick their successors. will be presented by Michifish as
The committee will discuss ways the annual Michigan water show '
of filling vacant positions if it in the Women's Pool.
appears, necess y and will an- I 8 p.m.-The Gilbert and Sulli-
1ounce its decision later this van Society 'will present "Yeoman
semester. :, of the Guard". in Lydia Mendels-
Anyone interested in serving sohn Theatre.
on the student advisory committee 8 p.m.-Samuel Bradon, vice-
f'r the residential college should president for undergraduates at
contact Dean Thuma in his office Indiana University, will deliver the l
at 1014 Angell Hall. keynote address for the Big Ten
Conference, in the League Ball-
room.
8 p.m.-Challenge will hold an
open meeting to discuss next year's
program, contemporary "mass so-
ciety," in the Challenge office, sec-
DIAL 5-6290 ond floor of the S.A.B.
HELD OVER 4th WEEK 8:30 p.m. - The Contemporary,
(thru Tues., April 6th) Music Festival will present works l
by Roberto Gerhard, Anton Web -
CONTINUOUS POPULAR en and Leon Kirchner in a pro-
PERFORMANCESI PRICESI' gram in Rackham Aud.

DIAL 662-6264
SHOWS START AT
1:00-3:35-6:15 & 9:00
AdeIL4 VIMD
JOEP1 _ if

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1

THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY.
INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS- 1965-1966
CHORAL UNION SERIES

AI

Wed., March 31 through Sat:, April 3 at 8 P.M.
Saturday Matinee at 2P.M.
Tickets on sale at the Lydia Mendelssohn box office
Friday and Saturday Evenings Sold Out:

yi
AsVIAEr
CHA 1.017!

:f. _

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i
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l

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, JEAN MARTINON, Conductor . . Sat Oct.
JOHN BROWNING, Piano soloist
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist ................................ Fri., Oct.
CZECH PHILHARMONIC, KAREL ANCERL, Conductor........ . Fri., Oct.
POZNAN CHOIR, from Poland.:...........................Tues., Nov.
MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC ORECHESTRA ...................Mon., Nov.
with MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, Cello soloist
"BARBER OF SEVILLE" (Rossini) NEW YORK CITY OPERA CO. Sun., Nov.
GRAND BALLET CLASSIQUE DE FRANCE................... Tues., Nov.
PHYLLIS CURTIN, Soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Co. .......Thurs., Jan.
MONTE CARLO NATIONAL ORCHESTRA, LOUIS FREMAUX, Cond. Sat., Feb.
MICHEL BLOCK, Piano soloist

9
15
29
2
15
21
23
20
26

ISA-UAC present
JAZZotS Lecture-Con cer
"JAZZ IN THE AMERICAN PERSPECTIVE"
Dr. Betty Chmaj, American Studies Prof.
and
The Dorothy Ashby Trio, jazz harpist

'.TANL[Y KRAMER "IV-S A
MAD,
UNA MAD, MAD,
PANAVISNMAD
UNITED ARTISTS WORLD"
Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees $1.25,
Eves. & Sun. $1.50

FRIDAY, APRIL 2
3 p.m.-Dean William Haber ofj
the literary college, Prof. Arnold:
Kaufman of the philosophy de-
partment, and Prof. Donald Brown
of the psychology department will
speak on "The Student Role in
SEvaluating Individual Faculty" in
Rm. 3 B of the Union.
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild,
will present W. C. Field in "The
Bank Dick" in Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-Michifish will present!
"Patterns in Sculpture" as the:
annual Michigan water show in
the Women's Pool.

Shows at
1:00 - 3:40 - 6:25

9:10

it

I I
s W.C. FIELDS I
* iN
U f
THE BANK DICK
f I
I 1
I f
Also starring Una Merkel
I :
f The pompous furious and bumbling master of "eloquent pan-
tomime" plays Egberg Souse, a man of innumerable roles, Loafer,
* Barfly, Embezzler, Movie Director, Bank Cop-he unwittingly *
catches the thief-and in the end, a Beloved Family Mon and *
Respectable Millionarie!,
I f
This is the film which includes Fields' riotous "Great Chase" i
I If
* scene, ten minutes of unmatchable comedy."
f 1

DIAL 8-6416
"A WILD AND
WONDERFUL
TIME !"
-Time Magazine
"WILD AS A RUNAWAY
TRAIN! A LULU! FUN
FOR FUN'S SAKE!"
-New York Times
JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO
FRANCOISE DORLEAC

EXTRA SERIES

NATIONAL BALLET, from Washington, D.C. .............(2:30) Sun., Mar. 27

SEASON TICKETS:
SINGLE CONCERTS:

CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA, GEORGE SZELL, Conductor ...........Wed., Oct.
MOSCOW PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA,....................Tues.; Nov.
with IGOR OISTRAKH, Violin soloist
"PAGLIACCI" and "CAVALLERIA RUSTIANA,"..........(2:30) Sun., Nov.
NEW YORK CITY OPERA CO.
RUMANIAN FOLK BALLET............................... Wed., Feb.
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist...................................Mon., Mar.

20
16
21
16
7

$25.00-$20.00-$17.00-$14.00-$12.00
$5.00-$4.50-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.50-$1.50

I.

=k

SEASON TICKETS: $12.50-$10.00-$8.50-$7.00-$6.00
SINGLE CONCERTS: $5.00-$4,50-$4.00-$3.50-$3.00-$2.50-$1.50
CHAMBER ARTS SERIES

NETHERLAND CHAMBER ORCHESTRA,....................
SZYMON GOLDBERG, Conductor and Violinist
RAFAEL PUYANA, Harpsichordist ... .................... .
NEW YORK PRO MUSICA, NOAH GREENBERG, Conductor ......
HERMANN PREY, Baritone, in a Lieder Recital ............... .
VIENN A OCTET ..... ...................... .. , .... . .. .
I SOLISTI VENETI ............................. . .......
CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY, THOR JOHNSON, Conductor

Mon., Oct.
Sun., Oct.
Fri., Nov.
Wed., Feb.
Tues., Mar.
Wed., Mar.
Thurs., Mar

18
31
12
2
1
16
31

U

T

Ll i i sn 44 rift4, A nr. rrti r rirnan

SEASON TICKETS: $18.00-$15.00-$12.00
SINGLE CONCERTS: $4.00-$3.00-$2.00

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