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April 01, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-04-01

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THURSDAY, 1 APRIL 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGR TRREE

THURSDAY. 1 APRIL 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Avert Paper Strike,
Negotiations Continue'

Viet Policy Vacillation Hints S

By CLARENCE FANTO

theory, Kosygin and Brezhnev are
not strong enough to carry out

NEW YORK (P)-A strike agaii
e newspapers was averted at least ten
a feverish round of negotiations at c
Postponement-of threatened stri
r Robert F. Wagner, who said the p
agreed to continue negotiations w
f New York City, which represents se
notice before any new strike deadlin
Resumption of negotiations wa
The city hall talks continued fo
tion of contracts of all 10 newspap

I1

Signs of a possible power strug- policies without succumbing to
nst one or more of the city's major gle- in the Kremlin have multi- other influences.
nporarily at 4 a.m. yesterday after plied in recent weeks and diplo-: Nikolai Podgorny, an important
ity hall. matic observers have pointed out figure in the Soviet Communist
ity hall. ~~~the Soviet Union's vacillation on fgr nteSve omns
ke action was announced by Mayor the Viet Nam crisis as symptoms party, has been frequently seen in
rinters and photoengravers unions e a ii t recent photographs of the top
rintrs nd hotengrver unonsof reorganization within the lead-, eaders. Podgorny in Khrushchev's
ith the Publishers Association of ership. ledes Pogorny in mhuychv'
timewasregrdedby anyob-
ven papers, and to serve 24 hours Although the Soviet leadership servers as a rival to Brezhnev for
e was set. has shown little outward change the succession. His present pos
is scheduled for 2 p.m. yesterday. in the six months since Nikita tion indicates that his views, as
ur hours past the midnight expira- Khrushchev was ousted from pow- well as those of party theoreti
er unions. The printers-who pre- er, shifting influences in the new cian Mikhail Suslov, carry al-
cipitated the strike two years ago collective leadership are evident. most as much authority as Brezh
and who are considered the key Last week, Soviet Communist nev"s.
union in the current negotiations party leader Leonid Brezhnev, Potential Challenge
-had threatened a strike at 2 a.m. speaking at a ceremony honor- Other observers have noted that
yesterday if no agreement was ing Russian astronauts Pavel Bely- Alexander Shelepin is holding an
reached. ayev and Alexei Leonov, warned increasingly important position
that the Soviet Union would con- and that he might even head a
The photoengravers had au- sider sending "volunteers" to aid
thoriedha strike any time after the Communist Viet Cong forces
miight.in South Viet Nam. However, ac-
The Machinists Union, which counts of Brezhnev's speech car-
also had authorized a strike, ried over the official news agen-
agreed to an extension before Icy Tass and on Soviet radio and
Wagner issued his statement. television omitted the reference to
l t r

cell within the collective leader-
ship that might eventually chal-
lenge Brezhnev. Shelepin has di-
rected the Soviet Secret Police for
many years, has close ties with the
Army and has received important
foreign assignments recently.
Soviet influence over foreign
Communist parties has suffered
a great decline in recent months
due to the ouster of Khrushchev,
a popular figure, and Communist
China's increasing strength and
influence. Many important Sovie!
political figures and party leaders
have become highly worried over
the situation and fear of Commu-
nist China has grown according
ly. Some Soviet officials feel a
stronger Soviet foreign policy
might alleviate the recent loss in
prestige and influence.

They postulate that a strong
Soviet response to U.S. actions in'
Viet Nam would help counteract'
the commanding influence held by
Communist China over Southeast
Asia. A newly reassertive Soviet
foreign policy might also return to
the fold foreign Communist par-
ties which have recently been wav-
ering in support for Communist
China or Russia.
Foreign Policy Risks
Of course, the Soviet Union, as
an industrialized, increasingly
prosperous nation, also faces risks
in a more aggressive foreign poli-
cy. Many Soviet leaders view the
recent detente wvith the West as
beneficial because it allows Russia
to devote increasing time and
money to further bolstering the
economy and alleviating agricul-

oviet Shakeup
tural difficulties. States during last year's election
Thus, the Soviet leaders face a campaign. The dissension, which
dilemma. To adopt a firmer for- is centered on the type and
eign policy might strengthen So- strength of foreign policy goals
viet leadership over world Com- and actions, may culminate either
munist parties but at the same in a clear-cut decision or in a
time would increase tensions with major leadership change at the
the West and threaten the na- top of the hierarchy.
tion's recent economic gains and The Viet Nam crisis serves as
plans. On the other hand, a for- a focal point for the dispute. A
eign policy which continues to be stronger, more aggressive response
relatively weak, vacillating and in- toward the U.S. bombing raids of
decisive seems certain to lead an North Viet Nam may save the
even greater loss in Soviet pres- Kosygin and Brezhnev leadership.
tige in view of Communist Chi- But continuing weakness and lack
nese gains in prestige and influ- of decision may be costly for the
ence. new leaders, and it is certain they
Major Debate realize the dilemma.
It can be imagined that a ma- These theories, espoused by U.S.
for debate is currently taking place diplomats both in Moscow and
within the Kremlin similar to the Washington, have yet to be con-
ones which gripped the United firmed by clear-cut evidence.

'Volunteers'
Pose Threat
VIET NAM (P)-A real threat
exists that thousands of "volun-
teers" will enter the war in South
Viet Nam on the Communist side
t -not Chinese or Russians, but
men from Communist North Viet
Nam.
Both the Chinese and the Rus-
sians have mentioned the possi-
bility of sending their own men to
Viet Nam. But the Soviet hint
was vague, and the Chinese have
shown no sign of hurry about
getting so deeply involved. This
talk of "volunteers" seemed in-
tended by both primarily to im-
press other. Communists in the
continuing quarrel between Mos-
cow and Peking.
But the. Chinese evidently are
prodding Hanoi to infiltrate into
the south thousands of young men
who can claim South Vietnamese
origin. Their presence in the south
would be a political as well as a
military factor, should there be
any lull in the war to permit ne-
gotiations.
A recent statement from Peking.
under the auspices of "National
Front for Liberation of South
Viet Nam" (NFLSV) representa-
tives stationed there, said Hanoi
would have every right to send
such mensouthward.
In addition the Viet Cong have
called for international help in
stopping the use of gas in South
Vietnamese war, Hanoi radio re-
ported yesterday.
World New
By The Associated Press
PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil -- A
dynamite bomb was found near
the bedroom window of the home
of United States Consul Thomas
Duffeld yesterday. The fuse had
burned to a few inches of the
charge and apparently was acci-
dentally extinguished, police said.
They expressed concern that ter-
rorists were operating in this
southern Brazil city.
* * *
SAIGON - United States and
Vietnamese warplanes launched
massive scorched earth raids
against the Viet Cong and attack-
ed a half dozen targets in North
Viet Nam yesterday.
The war's tempo speeded up in
the wake of the terrorist bombing
of the U.S. embassy in Saigon
though no direct connection was
evidenced between that atrocity
and the expanded military opera-
tions.
Communist gunners claimed a

1.
'
I
I

None of the unions said whatv
newspaper or newspapers would
be struck. Daily News Analysis
The unions agreed to Wagner's4-
request to keep the talks goimh This incident helps demonstrate
past the deadline. that Soviet foreign policy is by no
Tension mounted during the means the cohesive force it was
early morning hours as caucuses during the Stalin and Khrush-
and joint meetings were held in chev eras.
various parts of the city hall. Not only do Soviet leaders have
policy problems in Southeast Asia
The scene resembled the all- but the increasingly intense Sino-
night meetings that led to the set- Soviet dispute is causing added
tlement two years ago. Top-level difficulties. There have been re-
representatives of the publishers ports that Soviet shipments of de-
and unions were on hand. There fensive arms to North Viet Nam
was one big difference: the may- have been delayed by Communist
or said during a dinner recess last Chinese unwillingness to allow the
night that "it's more relaxed than materials to pass through Chinese
it was two years ago and there is territory. A major struggle for
less tension." influence in Southeast Asia seems
Shortly after the mayor's an- to be in the making between the
nouncement, Bertram A. Powers, two major powers of the Commu-
president of Local 6 of the Inter- nist world.
national Typographical Union, A major change in Soviet agri-
said the publishers had agreed culture has also been announced
they would "no longer" stand on by the new leaders. Sweeping re-
the $10.50 economic package forms providing for more invest-
offer. ment in agriculture, lower rural
The printer chief said the pub- taxes and lower price§ paid by
lishers agreed to "continue to ne- peasants for consumer goods is
gotiate with us for a settlement in expected to raise farmers' pur-
excess of $10.50." chasing power and reduce the
sharp contrast between urban and
forms represent a complete rever-
s Rpal of ex-Premier Khrushchev's
7 p fpol icies.
But perhaps the most remark-
able difference b e t w e e n the
toll of six U.S. aircraft and at Khrushchev regime and the new
least 'three Americans were killed collective leadership is the lack of
in the day's action. the personality cult. The new lead-
*UITE Ners present an almost anonymous
S UNITED NATIONS-The So- image to the public. Their pictures
viet Union yesterday asked UN are rarely seen in Soviet news-
Secretary-General U Thant to papers. Their New Year's Message
call a meeting of the 114-nation to the Soviet people lacked any
UN Disarmament Commission individual name. Their conversa-
within the next two weeks. tion with the Soviet astronauts
The request was made by Soviet in orbit lacked warmth and per-
Ambassador Nikolai T. Federenko. sonal quality.
* * The apparent confusion over
NEW HAVEN-Trustees of the foreign policy; the sudden shifts
bankrupt New Haven Railroad an- in domestic policy; and the lack
nounced yesterday that they have of a strong leadership image all
reached agreement with officers contribute to the impression that
f the Pennsylvania and New York the Kremlin is not a place of se-
Central Railroads for the sale of renity these days. In the past,
New Haven properties for a pro- policy hesitation by the Soviet Un-
posed merged system. ion has usually indicated internal
The announcement came three dissension and a possible power
,ays after Interstate Commerce struggle.
Commission examiners had rec- Observers in Moscow feel that
rmmended the merger of the members of the collective leader-
Pennsylvania and New York Cen- ship other than Kosygin or Brezh-
tral into the nation's largest rail- nev are exerting an influence on
road. policy decisions. According to this

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FORCASTS A

BURSTING WITH JUST-FOR-FUN
--
FA SH 1NS F ROM OU R L IV ELY COL LECT ION
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6.98

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8.98

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B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street
Announces
PASSOVER SEDARIM & MEALS
April 17-24, 1965

!

1I

Hillel Members
PLEASE READ CAREFULLY ,custnd t
full year's rate
Special Package Rate for all 16 Meals ..$30.00
Each Seder (Complete Ceremonial
& Dinner)....................3.75

Non-Members
and Guests
$34.00
4.25
1.75
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Each Lunch.....................
Each Dinner.....................

1.40
2.30

Enclosed is my check [Q
dr money order Q (Check appropriate box)
drawn to "B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation Trust Account"

11.98

for $ to cover the following:

(Be sure to specify)

ai
D

All
Seder, Friday, April 16
Lunch, Saturday, April 17
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Lunch, Sunday, April 18
Dinner, Sunday, April 18
Lunch, Monday, April 19
Dinner, Monday, April 19
Lunch, Tuesday, April 20

1 16 Meals
Q Dinner, Tuesday, April 20
' Lunch, Wednesday, April 21
Q Dinner, Wednesday, April 21
F1 Lunch, Thursday, April 22
If Dinner, Thursday, April 22
Q Lunch, Friday, April 23
Q Dinner, Friday, April 23
Q ,Lunch, Saturday, April 24

11.98

She absolutely flips over our spunky
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