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March 31, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-31

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PAGE TWO

THiE'MIlCIGA~N DA~ILY

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WEDNESDAYx, 31 MARCH 1965

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CIC Brings Combined
Celebrate American Jazz Origins Ideas to National Focus

{

The Gilbert & Sullivan Society
presents

.

By KAY HOLMES
Amid the competitive world
space race and concern over
missile miscarriages, scientific
Americans can be secure in the
knowledge of one uniquely Ameri-
can achievement - the creation
and conception of jazz, America's
contribution to world culture.
Recognizing the strictly Ameri-
can origin, of jazz, Jazz Scene '65
will be held at the University
from Thursday through Sunday,
during "American Week." Organ-
ized by Dave Lundin, Grad, and
sponsored jointly by the Interna-
tional Students Association and
the University Activities Center,
this is the first professional jazz
festival to be held in Ann Arbor.
The festival will begin Thurs-
day with a lecture on "Jazz in the
American Perspective" by Bettyj
Chmaj, teacher and scholar in
the field of American Studies,
and the "Dorothy Ashby Trio"
from Detroit's Cafe Gourmet. Miss
Chmaj will speak of jazz in rela-
tion to other American arts, with
visual illustrations, readings from
literature, and musical demonstra-
tions by the Dorothy Ashby Trio.
Contribution
Speaking of her longstanding
interest in jazz, Miss Chmaj said:
"It is not only that jazz is a
major contribution to world cul-
ture, jazz is more closely related
to the life and times of our coun-
try than most art forms. When
painting, literature, and jazz are
set side by side, you recognize
something both about them and
about yourself as an American
from what they have in common."
The Ashby Trio is a mainstay
on the Detroit jazz scene. Down
Beat poll winner, Miss Ashby is
the only jazz harpist playing both
chords and melody. The group
records on the Argo label and has
appeared on the Tonight and the
Today shows. They use a softsell
approach to jazz.

(Continued from Page 1)
tuition of whichever school was
lower.
In 1964 a second institute was
held at Indiana University.
Among other fields that offer-
ed traveling scholar program are
agricultural education, political
science, mathematical biology,
psychology, veterinary medicine.
speech.
Although Michigan did not send
any scholars during the 1963-64
season, 13 scholars visited here
under the program. They were'
enrolled in such disciplines as po-
litical science, physics and psy-
chology.
Penningtoll
Gets Award
Prof. Arthur J. Pennington of
the electrical engineering depart-
ment has been named the 1965
winner of the Henry Russel'

The traveling scholar program
was set up on a temporary basis
for the 1963-64 and 1964-65 sea-
son, with the stipulation that at
the end of the two year period
it would be decided whether or
not the program would become
permanent. This proposal is now
under consideration.
"The CIC has done much to
improve the image of the educa-
tion offered at these 11 ma-
jor midwestern universities," Wil-
liams commented. "Through this
project we have tried to make
the best use out of the available
resources at each university in-
volved."
About 1956 the presidents of the
Big 10 universities of the Midwest
realized the need for the best
)ossible research available. With
this thought in mind they decided
to form the CIC.
In 1958 they received a grant
from the Carnegie Corporation in
New York which enabled them to
begin the program.
Each of the interested universi-
ties appointed one administrative
officer to form CIC. At this first

Wed., March 31 t
Saturday
Tickets on sale at th
Friday and Sa
-4

~(the
hrough Sat., April 3 at 8 P.M.
y Matinee at 2 P.M.
he Lydio Mendelssohn box office
iturday Evenings Sold Out

THE DETROIT CONTEMPORARY FIVE, from left to right, Larry Nozero, tenor, Danny Spencer,
drums, John Dana, bass, Ron English, guitar, and Charles Moore, coronet will be in the "Jazz
Scene, '65" program, the first professional jazz program in Ann Arbor. They will play as the Detroit
Contemporary Four, because Nozero is entering the armed forces.

Award. This is the highest honor meeting the representatives agreed
the University can bestow a fac- that the University of Chicago
ulty member below the rank of would also join the program since
associate professor. Prof. Penning- their interests were so similar to
ton is an assistant professor. the other schools.

Following this background lec-
ture, on the Americanisms in
jazz, will be a discussion of the
current trends in jazz on Friday.
A panel discussion on "Jazz in
America Today: What's It Doing
and Why" will explore the mus-
ical, educational and business as-
pects of jazz.
Such questions as should jazz
be taught in schools, and is jazz
commercially profitable, will be
discussed by a panel headed by
John Sinclair, Down Beat's De-
troit correspondent, and composed
of musicians Charles Moore, Ron
English, and Ron Brooks, musi-
cian agent Lutz Bacher, and,

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j r CA
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31 'J A. Cohen of Harvard Lawt
3:15 p.m. - Profs. Harold J. School will speak on "Substantive(
Berman and Jerome A. Cohen of Criminal Law in the Soviet Union
the Harvard Law School will and Communist China" in 120(
speak on "Criminal Procedure in Hutchins Hall.
the Soviet Union and Communist 4:10 p.m. - Kenneth Cragg ofc
China" in 120 Hutchins Hall. St. Augustine's College, Canter-t
3:30 p.m.--David Lewis, archi- bury, Kent, England, will speakt
tect of Leeds, England, will give on "The Mystery of the Quran t
a lecture on "High-Density, Multi- (Koran): Its Contemporary Rele-r
usage Structures in the Centers vance" in the Multipurpose Rm.C
of Cities" in Architecture Aud. of the UGLI.
4:10 p.ma - Kenneth Cragg of 4:10 p.m. - Betty Chmaj oft
St. Augustine's College, Canter- Wayne State University and thet
on "The Mystery of the Quran Dorothy Ashby Trio for Detroit'sf
(Koran): Its Ruling Themes" in Cafe Gourmet will speak on "WhatI
the Multipurpose Rm. of the Makes Jazz American" in theg
UGLI. Union ballroom.s
4:10 p.m,.-Prof. Edward Nor- 7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild I
beck of Rice University will speak will present W. C. Field in "TheI
on "Social and Religious Change Bank Dick" in Architecture Aud.P
in Japan" in 200 Lane Hall. 8 p-m.-The Gilbert and Sulli-P
- 4:15 p.m.-John J. Manning of van Society will present "Yeoman
the junior-senior counseling of- of the Guard" in Lydia Mendels-
fice will speak on "The Last sohn Theatre.t
Chance Speech" in the Hender- 8 p.m.-Samuel Bradon, vice-
son Rm. of the League. president for undergraduates at
8 p.m.-The Gilbert and Sulli- Indiana University, will deliver the
van Society will present "Yoemen keynote address for the Big 'Ten
of the Guard" in Lydia Mendels- Conference, in the League Ball-
sohn Theatre, room.
8:30 p.m. - The Contemporary, r8p.m.-Challenge will hold an
Music Festival will present works open meeting to discuss next year's
by Elliott Carter, American com- program, contemporary "mass so-
poser, who will speak on "Rule, ciety," in the Challenge office, sec-,
Rote and Note" during the second and floor of the S.A.B.
half' of the program in Hill Aud. 8:30 p.m. - The Contemporary:
Music Festival will present works
THURSDAY, APRIL 1 |by Roberto Gerhard, Anton Web-
S3:15 p.m.-Prof. F. Feldbrugge, ern and Leon Kirchner in a pro-
University of Leiden, and Prof. gram in Rackham Aud.

music educators Jerry Bilik and
Carl Alexius of the University.
"Function '65" will take place
Saturday at the Sabo Club. Orig-
inated by Ron Brooks, the 14
week old Sabo Club features mu-
sicians from all over Michigan
The weekly sessions are held for
the benefit of musicians who want
a place to play and listeners who
want a place to listen.
This non-commercial club has
not remained obscure to profes-
sionals. Two weeks ago Roland
Kirk, known for playing three
horns at one time as well as his
whistling flute' and his one note
song, stopped in before his De-
troit engagement.
The climax of the festival will,
be a Michigan Jazz Concert on
Sunday afternoon, featuring the
George Bohanon / Ronnie Fields
Quintet, readings by the Work-
shop Poets, the Ron Brooks Fes-
tival Quintet and the Detroit
Contemporary 4.
From Detroit's Village Gate, the
George Bohanon / Ronnie Fields
Quintet began in 1964 and pro-
ceeded to prove that jazz-wise,
things were getting better in De-
troit. The group is composed of
George Bohanon, trombone: Ron-
nie Fields, saxophone; Kenny
Cox, piano; Will Austin, bass; and
Bert Myrick, drums.
The Ron Brooks Festival Quin-
tet was created especially for the
festival and is composed of "the
best talent" Brooks could get to-
gether from various parts of the
state. Its members are Ron
Brooks, bass; Tim Tompki, piano;
Danny Spencer, drums; Floyd
Moreland, tenor; and Sherman
Mitchell, trombone.
Community Involvement
Both the Workshop Poets and
the Detroit Contemporary 4 orig-

The award was made at cere-
inate from the Detroit, Artists' monies Tuesday, March 30. It car-
Workshop. The Artists' Workshop ries a $750 stipend and official
is an attempt at community in- recognition for "conspicuous serv-
volvement on an artistic and per- ice to the University."
sonal level by a group of young
Detroit musicians, poets, painters,
writers, photographers and film-
makers. John Sinclair, Robin a
Eichele, George Tysh, and Jim
Semark will represent the Work-
shop Poets at the festival.':
The Detroit Contemporary 4 is
a cooperative jazz group commit-.
ted to exploring the possibilities'
inherent in _the new jazz musicj
with emphasis on group impro-
visation. It comprises Charles .
Moore cornet; Ron English,
guitar; John Dana, bass; and
Danny Spencer, drums.>
Halber To, Talk;
With Students
The literary college steer ng
committee .will hold -its second PROF. ARTHUR PENNINGTON
open meeting of the semester at The award was established in
3 p.m. on Friday, April 2 in Rm. 1920 by a bequest from Henry Rus-
3B of the Michigan Union. sel, '73, of Detroit. It is given
Speaking on the "Student Role annually to an instructor or as-
in Evaluating Individual Faculty" sistant professor whose teaching
will be Dean William Haber of the skills and scholarship are out-
literary college, Prof. Arnold standing and hold great promise
Kaufman of the philosophy de- for the future.
partment, and Prof. Donald Brown Pennington was cited particu-
of the psychology department. larly for his work with course
The meeting will be open to all and curricula reform. He initiat-
students interested in discussing ed and conducted new courses in
policy formation in the literary electrical engineering at the upper
college, class level.

I

DIAL 8-6416
SNEAK
PREVIEW
TON IGHT,
at 7:20
Regular Feature (below)
Shown Once Only at 9 P.M.

I d

I

Geddes Road

8:30 P.M.

Tues., Apr. 6

I

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC WITHOUT CHARGE

Holding for a 2nd Week
"A WILD AND
WONDERFUL
TIME!"
-Time Magazine
"WILD AS A RUNAWAY
TRAIN! A LULU! FUN
FOR FUN'S SAKE!"
--New York Times
JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO
FRANCOISE DORLEAC
JEAN SERVAIS
Filmed in EASTMANCOLOR

I

I

ANN ARBOR CANTATA SINGERS
with orchestra
DANIEL POLITOSKE
guest conductor
rI. BACH, J. S.-Missa Brevis in G
11I. BRAHAMS,i.-Motet based on Psalm 51
11l. DELL0J010, N.-Psalm of David (51)
CHAPEL CONCORDIA LUTHERAN COLLEGE

I

I

DIAL
662-6264

Shown at 1 :00
3:35-6:15 and 9:00
Feature Starts
25 Minutes Later

=-

l

hum

DIAL 5-6290
3RD
WEEK!
CONTINUOUS POPULAR
PERFORMANCESI PRICESI
STANLEY KRAMER "Ml A
MAD,
UTA Av MAD, MAD,
PANAISIOCMA
TECHNICLOM
UNITED ARTISTS WORLD"
Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees $1.25
Eves, & Sun. $1.50
Shows at
1:00 - 3:40 - 6:25 - 9:10

I

BF------- MFBdd GINwILupM

J

JOSEPH CslT,,

NOMINATED FOR
7 ACADEMY AWARDS
7IUSIL.. HA
CIIARIGITE

I

i

I

Full Time & Evening Employment
18-35
If you are free from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m, four evenings each week end
occasionally on Saturday, you con maintain your studies and still enjoy
o part-time job doing special interview work that will bring on average
weekly income of $67,
If you are neat appearing and a hard worker call Mr. Jones at 761-
1488 from 10 a.m. to 12 a.m. Monday-Friday. No other times,
We are also interested in full-time employment.

I

I

TONIGHT!

4w

today only
the original graphic art of:
baskin * ensor * chagall * miro
4 giacometti * sloan * kollwitz * appel
and many others

Professional Theatre
Program
and
Creative Arts Festival
present
STUDY OF THE NEGRO STRUGGLE
FREEDOM IN AMERICA.

A BRIlLIANT
FOR

I n i .--------I

"THE PAIN,

I

I

i

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