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March 26, 1965 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-26

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PAGE TWO

THE MIHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY. 241 MAflEHTI1961

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ARTS and LETTERS By Joyce Winslow
Badanes Sees Life as Miracle

Evans Details Proposal
For WCBN Expansion

Preferences
Studied in
LSA Tests

By DICK WINGFIELD arrive from the Evans Products
Co. These materials, a donation
Jthe from that company, will be stored

PAKISTAN STUDENTS.ASSOCIATION
Presents
CULTURAL SHOW
on the Occasion of
PAKISTAN AY

He took a drag on his cigarette,
put his foot upon the chair and
started reading from the book in
his left hand. Forgotten was the
cigarette which burned to ash be-
tween his fingers. His audience
was hypnotized, for Jerry Badanes
was not merely reading poetry, he
was enacting the passion and
miracle that is life. As he read, he
seemed to become the poem, as
though he were the medium
through which the spirit of ex-
perience spoke.
Badanes lowered the book of
Dart Crane and explained his
thoughts on the difference be-
tween Crane and T. S. Eliot:
"Eliot walks into a subway and
notices that it is dirty, smells of
ozone and sweat, and that the
people are sullen. But you know,
it's like he steps back away from
it all. It is too horrible for him.
Crane, on the other hand, walks
into the station. His head spins
too, but Crane stops and looks at
someone; Crane does not retire
into the background, as Eliot does.
One can blame a poet for step-
ping back," he said.
University Graduate
Badanes, who describes himself
as "having a belly like a man with
a belly eating an apple watching
TV," and having the "long hair
of a poet," was an English major
at the University until his gradu-
ation in '62. He now lives in New
York, writes poetry, and works
part-time as a cashier. Generation
sponsored a reading of his poetry
in the Union March 23.
Reading with Badanes was Ed
Botts, a '59 graduate who also
majored in English. He currently;
lives in New York, working as a
carpenter at the Guggenheim
Museum. Badanes won a major
Hopwood Award in 1962 for a
"Manuscript of Poems." Botts
"remembers losing many," but ac-
tually won the Freshman Award
in '56 for "Seven Poems" and the
Sophomore Award in '57 for
APA Lists ,
Fall Prices
Students now have an opportu-
nity to subscribe to three plays
which will premiere in Ann Ar-
bor in the fall and then move to1
Broadway next December.
Discount subscriptions to the
fourth Fall Festival of the Asso.
.iation of Producing Artists, un-
der the sponsorship of the Pro:
fessional Theatre Program, wily
be available this week through
September at the subscription of-
fice of the Lydia Mendelssohn,
Theatre from 10 a. x. to 1 p.m
and 2 p.m. to 5 p.m; daily.
Student discounts are 25 per
cent off the box office price and
general, public discounts are 1
per cent off the box office price
Regular box office prices rang
f'-om $2.40-$5 per ticket on Fri-
day and Saturday nights, and'
from $4 to $1.80 for Saturday
matinees. Weekday performances+
will cost from $2.00 to $4 per
ticket.
The student may place a $5'
deposit on his choice of seats and
performance now and pay the
rest In September. This will b
easy on his budget and will als
enable him to see three pre-
Broadway plays for about th
same price as three movie tickets

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hoard of W VV. ga4Svecte tzaus lastby the University until they are If you entered the University as
night of plans for the proposed needed for the expansion. a freshman in the fall of 1963 or
expansion of WCBN. Donation 1964 in the College of Literature,
Evans said that the expansion Michigan Bell has already do- Science and the Arts. then you are
will include two major transmit- nated $4500 worth of equipment part of the Michigan student
ter units-one located in the law to be used in the proposed con- study.
quad and one in the Alice Lloyd struction. Among the many forms and
building. The project is expected Evans said that the proposed questionnaires freshmen were con-
to cost about $44,000, $19,000 of $25,000 Unversity loan will be fronted w'th during summer
which WCBN will acquire in the worked out next week with Uni- orientation in 1963 and 1964 was
form of cash and materials and versity officials. a questionnaire from the study
$25,000 in the form of a loan from Evans pointed out that it is im- wh.ch asks about friendship pref-
the University. perative that construction begin erences, parental influence in de-
On April 1, a shipment of build- within the next three weeks so cision making and political lean-
ing supplies valued at $8500 will that the new radio facilities can ings.
begin transmitting by the time The study 's under the direction
. " orientation starts next fall. He of Prof. Theodore M. Newcomb of
e Te- said that a large amount of WCBN the psychology and sociology de-
Vlet ieacin atetan Gead ura
advertising is done during this partments and Gerald Gurin, a
pre-semester period and that "the program director of the Survey
D 'aws Crowd loss of this income would be dis- Research Center.
astrous." The general hypothesis of the
"The necessity of beginning study is that the type of people
UntilM orn ng Ione meets at the University is an
- gag soon is evident," Evans said. "It nmesatheUiriyisn
will take the University Plant important factor in the develop-
(Continued from Page 1) Department two or three months ment of the student and the type
many of the students relaxed over to complete construction; it will of person he becomes by the time
a game of bridge or merely in- take our engineers a minimum of he leaves the University.
formally discussed the night's two months to install the tech- In the spping of 1963 and 1964
events. A second set of seminars nical equipment. a random sample of freshmen were
began at 4 a.m Occupy Space again asked to fill out a question-
bea at 4aom4. n m At the present the Office of naire and were interviewed con-
At Room 443 Mason Hall more igosA cerning their individual friend-
than 60 students took seats, sat Religious Affairs and certain re-rce. Andhedalend-
on the floor, or croned their necks 'ligious groups associated with it ship circles. Another sample, call-
inside the door to hear Prof. are occupying the space in the ed the "core" sample will be taken
Frithjof Bergmann of the philso- basement of the Student Activi- from this second group and re-
phy department speak, ties Building which is planned to interv'ewed in 1966 and 1967.
Earlie ha t evening he had house the expanded WCBN offices Each student in the survey is
a mt allow the Viet- and studios. Richard Cutler, vice- assigned a code number and the
__ifnrain i fid ntia Ol

3
;_

AT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron and E. Washington Streets
on Friday, March 28, 1965, 7:30 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE
Display and Sale of Pakisfinian Handicraft
REFRESHMENTS

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the Daily edit staff

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JERRY BADANES, WHO TRIES to "enter into and look at life,"
reads his poetry. He was an English major at the University,
who won a Major Hopwood Award in 1962, and now lives, works
and writes in New York. He gave a poetry reading March 23

sponsored by Generation.
"Poems."
What is their philosophy of

two miracles occurred. It attackedj
and I withstood."

poetry? What poets have most influ- namese to be governed by the gov- president for student affairs, said1
"The dominant theme in my enced Badanes and Botts? ernment they have chosen them- that. "We cannot and will not
poems is miracle," said Badanes. "You talk about my poetry," selves-the Viet Cong." evict these groups until adequate
"I attempt to address the reader Badanes said to Botts, "and I'll quarters have been obtained else-
as a comrade-to say: 'Here I am talk about yours." Final Session where within which they may con-
and this is how it seems to me.' "Badanes feels connected to By 6 o'clock 325 students gath- duct their religious services."
I try to enter into and look." Chile's Pablo Neruda," said Botts. ered for the final sessions. One "I believe the University could
Possibility of Miracle "Also Frederico Garcia Lorca." speaker said that the teach-in had possibly complete a project of this
What does he mean by miracle? "Botts favorite is Rene Char," illustrated a new dimension in ed- ,caliber in less than two or three
"Well, sometimes I see an old said Badanes. "He also likes Wil- ucation. He said the barriers be- months. However, it would require
lady eating dinner and I think: liam Carlos Williams." Both Bad- tween students and teachers had a crash program and as yet there
how did she make it to 75? This anes and Botts feel connected to been broken, and claimed both has been no indication that this
is miracle," he said. Caesar Vallejo. were the better for it. type of program would be feas-I
"To me," he continued, "the Greek Poet . Towards the end one student ible." Evans commented.
meaning of the big bomb is that "We also like Lardas's poetry" rose and said, "I'm just a lowly "This is only the first of several
for the first time we have some- Badanes said, referring to Kon- freshman, but this teach-in shows;phases," Evans added. He pointed
thing that could possibly end mir- stantinos Lardas of the English me what a University has to be." out that WCBN will install a
acle. Many people think of that department. "Lardas is the great- I-transmission unit in the new 18-
and act as though there is no pos- est Greek poet in English," Bad- j' story building this summer. WCBN
sibility of miracle. We have to live anes said. 5'lint Extension; will install a transmitter unit in
miracle, create miracle and are "Lardas' poetry makes the re- . . the Oxford Housing Project after
ourselves miracle." ceiver active," continued Badanes. S ll Incteiin it the expansion is completed. Plans
"Poetry is on6 'df 'the best ways "One cannot sit back and eat an are underway to service North
to say something to someone else," apple while he reads it.",Campus: other housing units have
Botts said. "The poet tries to give At their poetry reading, Botts We have not discussed the Caps; oterehouin itsave
back to the reader something es- read his "Thanksgiving Eve" and possibility of Flint making 60 eCBs ntst n r nmarkin
bac WCBN units,Evnreakd
sential about the reader himself." "Sometimes" among others. Bad- acres ayailable for a new college
"A poet's job is to look, to re- anes read his "The Journey," "In campus with Flint officials," Ex- T e ultimate goal of WCBN is
spond, and to lave." the City" and another poem. "I: ecutive Vice - President Marvin tesserve thbl community with the
Match Miracle didn't have a title for poem whenNiehuss said yesterday. bes poibleaprograinmen
Badaes ~ igh I ameto nn rbo," e sid. Niehuss referred specifically toI news, sports and entertainment,
Badanes lened for itand tQ light, I came to Ann Arbor," he said. Neusrfre pcfclyt and to become the nation's leader
his cigarette When; he struck the "Now I do." The poem is called to a plan outlined by Sen. Gar- an o ece the nans sade
match it s u 4 tlw4 into'his "A Powerful Nostalgia for To- land Lane (D-Flint) at a meeti g in ole ra E said. He
Iia pointed out that the station at
eye. "There he sai, "Just ,then morrow." of the State Board of Education the University of Illinois has the
------Ac-cor_-_____ Wednesday. most listeners at present, but that
[ - According to Lane. a group of WCBN will account for 15,000
Iprominent Flint citizens is con- WB ilacutfr1,0
sidrina prol f te it o- after the proposed expansion is
Croc f _ /u sidering a proposal for the city toII completed.
Ve~e7 C a p i~idonate the land as the site of a ?__
four-year college campus, prefer-
ably a branch of the University.
FRIDAY, MARCH 26 gressman from Oregon and co- "We are certainly interested in
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Joseph Zubin chairman of the Committee For such a proposal," Niehuss saidX
of Columbia University will speak a Review of Our China Policy in "but Lane's comments are the 1
to the psychology dept. colloquium the Multipurose Room of the first we've heard about any spe- DIAL 8-6416
on "Culture and Psychopathology" UGLI. cific plans." "A
in Aud. C. 7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild Niehuss reiterated that the Uni-A WIND
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guilcl will present Howard Hawk's "The versity's position on the proposedWE
will present Ben Johnson's "Vol- Big Sleep" in Architecture Aud. expansion of its two-year Flint
pone" in Architecture Aud. branch next fall remain the same TIME !"
7:30 p .-A program of mov- 7:30 p.m.-A program of Pakis- -that is, the University may re-
ies, singing and entertainment ai cultur wi e presented as consider, but will not necessarily
will be presented as part of theAware: Pakistan? - Of Its Cul change, its plans after the state "WILDASA RUNAWAY
series: "Are You Aware: Pakis- ture?" in Rackham Amphitheatre. tad and the issue OR TRAIN! A LULU! FUN
tan?" in the International Center. taken a stand on the issue. FOR FUN'S SAKE!"
7:30 p.m.-The Sierra Club will 8:30 p.m. - T h e University ---N,
1w York Times

inioima ion is conimenui m
the statistical results are released
to the University.
DIAL 662-6264
SHOWS START AT
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:00
! ENDING SATURDAY !
ME THOUSAND MILES OF
INCREDIBLE ADVENTURE!

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Are you and youdolly
Y orset for the weekend?
The happy couple above is so effervescently
joyous because they got their tickets to the
GLEE CLUB SPRING CONCERT
Why don't you?
SATURDAY, MARCH 27, 8:30 P.M.
HILL AUDITORIUM
MANY GOOD SEATS LEFT!
Tickets on Sale Today and Tomorrow
at Hill Box Office
$1.50, $2.00, $2.50

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SUiNLJ/AY
NOMINATED FOR 7
ACADEMY AWARDS
An Asloc a!.. and Atltd, CompanyPpuh

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depending upon the seats he present a
chooses. mountain(
Two of the three plays schedul- of the An
ed for the Fall Festival are ex- 8 p.m.
pected to be American premieres speak on
The third will be a new version Needs It"
of a classic, according to plan' Arts Festi
being formulated by T. EdwarcI SATR
Itambleton, Phoenix Theatre pro 10 a.m.-
ducer; Ellis Rabb, creative direc- Prof. Dav
tor of the APA, and Prof. Schnit- political;
zer. Stephan Porter, stager o' Yale Uni
"Man and Superman," one of thr Committe
APA's smash off-Broadway hit' the Admi
this season, will direct one of next Ch na To
fall's plays. Another of the play: purpose R
will be staged by Alan Schneider 1 p.m.-
director of Broadway's "Tiny I-Tt Chen
Alice," and of "Who's Afraid of Formosans
Virginia Woolf?" which was flown the Multip
to Ann Arbor from New York in 4 p.m.-
1963. Charles (

lecture and movie on
eering in the basement
n Arbor library.
- Shepard Mead w i 11
"Mass Culture, Who
as part of the Creative
ival in the Union.
URDAY. MARCH 27
-Challenge will present
id Nelson Rowe, of the
science. department of
versity representing the
e of One Million Against
nission of Comimunist
the U.N. in the Multi-
oom of the UGLI.
-Challenge will present
, President of the United
s for Independence in
purose Room of theUGLI.
-Challenge will present
0. Porter, former con-

Men's Glee Club will give a con-
cert in Hill Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The Newman Stu-
dent Association will present Igor
Stravinsky's "L'Histoire du Sol-
dat" at Newman Center
INSTANT
S I L ENCE
STUDY ANYTIME
ANYWHERE
Sound attenuators as
utilized by military and
commercial jet aircraft
ground crew personnel
are the perfect solution.
For information write:
Academic Aids
P. 0. Box 969
Berkeley 1, Calif.

--Ivt:w Ivry /6nva

DIAL 5-6290
3RD
WEEK!
CONTINUOUS POPULAR
PERFORMANCES IPRICESI
STANLEY KRAMER "flS A
MAD,
UTRA MAD MAD
PANAISIO MAD
TECHNICOLOR! MRLD
UNITED ARTISTS WORLD"
Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees $1.25
Eves. & Sun. $1.50
Shows at
1:00 - 3:40 - 6:25 - 9:10

TROE
JEAN-PAUL BELMONDO
FRANCOISE DORLEAC
JEAN SERVAIS
Filmed in EASTMANCOLOR

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E---------..-----------. ------- ----------nw s
I s
E
Ben Jonson'sE
E E
EVOLPONEE
(The Fox)
M E
Starring HARRY BAUR and LOUIS JOUVET
E
E E
Maurice Tourneur directs a brilliant screen performance
* of Jonson's classic of a clever swindler and his cronies, E
* as VOLPONE pretends to be dying in order to extract
U1
rich gifts from his greedy friends and hopeful heirs. E
* T. S. Eliot has written of Jonson's ploys, "If we had a
* contemporary Shakespeare and a contemporary Jonson, I
E it might be the Jonson who would arouse the enthu-
siasm of the intelligentsia. . . His work is a titanic show."
VOLPONE is the finest of Jonson's ploys and the most I
E delightful of all classical comedies.
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MUSKET
proudly announces its

'-(.

new

fp

General Co-Chairmen

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