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March 21, 1965 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-21

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SUNDAY, 21 MARCH 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SUNDAY, 21 MARCH 1965 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Turkey

Threatens 'Clash'

Ranger 9 Initiates Crucial Space Week

With Greece Over Cyprus

ANKARA, Turkey (R) -Turkey
informed the United States yes-
terday it is ready to risk a serious
clash with Greece over the con-
dition of Turkish Cypriots on
Cyprus, a cabinet source reported.
The tough message was deliver-
ed John Jernegan, Deputy Assist-
ant Secretary of State for the
Middle East and South Asia, and
sent him flying to Athens ahead
of schedule. Premier Suat Hayri
Urguplu met with Jernegan and
U.S. Ambassador Raymond Hare
at a luncheon.
The source said Urguplu told
the Americans what policy Turkey
would follow to halt "the terror
and pressure placed on the Turk-
ish Cypriots" by Greek Cypriots
and added:
If Necessary
"If necessary, Turkey would
consider a serious clash with
Greece in this connection."
There were unconfirmed reports
of increased military activities on
Turkey's southern coast, opposite
Cyprus.
Greece has warned Turkey not
to interfere in Cyprus, where the
Turks say the Greek Cypriots are
blockading T u r k i s h Cypriots
around the northwest port of
Lefka. Turkey is threatening to
stage air raids to relieve pressure
on the Turkish Cypriots.
Reliable Sources
Reliable sources said Turkey is
planning to hand Greece a vir-
tual ultimatum demanding that
the blockade be lifted. This is to
be coupled with a demand that
Greek Cypriot President Makarios
life "inhuman pressure" on the
Turkish Cypriots, who are in the
minority on the island.
Turkish officials said that
Jernegan, who was scheduled to
remain in Turkey three more days,
changed plans and decided to fly
to Athens.
Urguplu's reported statement to
the Americans followed by only a

few hours a rejection by Greek
Premier George Papandreou ofs
Turkey's request for direct talks
on. Cyprus. The Turkish premier
earlier had said he would holdl
negotiations on any level at anyi
time.
Greek Policy
"The Greek government's policy
is to maintain peace," Papandreou
said in a statement in Athens.
"As to the opening of talks be-
tween Greece and Turkey, there
is the United Nations mediator
and we ought to help him to suc-
ceed in his work."
The UN Security Council met
Friday and voted to continue the
UN peacekeeping operation on
Cyprus for three months.

A Turkish foreign ministry
spokesman called Papandreou's
rejection "very unfortunate."
Urguplu met with political
leaders to discuss the exact word-
ing of a note to Athens and to
determine how strong it would be.
It was understood that Urguplu
was seeking support for his Cy-
prus actions chiefly from his pre-
decessor as premier, Ismet Inonu,
who now heads the single opposi-
tion party to Urguplu's four-party
coalition. Urguplu is taking a
tougher stand on Cyprus than
Inonu.
The note was expected to ask
among other things, that the
Greek Cypriots permit delivery of
Red Cross relief supplies.

INSURE PROTECTION:
State, Federal Troops
Deployed in Alabama

By CLARENCE FANTO l
One of the most important
weeks in the history of the
United States' drive to conquer
space and land a man on thef
moon begins today as a Ranger 91
spacecraft aims for an impact
on a noon crater. If all goes
well, the craft will send back
photographic studies of t h e
moon's surface Wednesday morn-
ing.
The climax of the week's space
spectacular is tentatively schedul-
ed for Tuesday morning as astro-
nauts Virgil I. Grissom and John
W. Young set out on the world's,
first orbit-shifting manned space
flight. The event marks the first
time the U.S. has put more than
one man in space at a time and
also the first time a space ship
has actually been "flown" by the
astronauts.
Spell of Gloom
Although the Soviet Union's
two-man space flight of Thurs-
day and Friday cast a brief spell
of gloom over Cape Kennedy,
space officials point out that the
two Soviet astronauts did not con-
trol their flight by shifting its
orbit as the U.S. pilots will prob-
ably do. However, officials ack-
nowledged that the Soviet feat
of suspending a man outside a
spacecraft and having him per-
form solar acrobatics puts the
Russians at least two years ahead
of the U.S. in the race for the
moon.
Excitement is running high at
Cape Kennedy where more than
600 newsmen are preparing to
cover the week's activities. Tues-
day's Gemini flight will be na-
tionally televised. The flight is
scheduled to begin between 9 a.m.
and noon. The launching period
is restricted because of a require-
ment for two hours of daylight in
the landing area after the sched-
uled 4 hour, 52-minute whirl
through space.
The weatherman's forecast was
discouraging to space officials.
Heavy clouds were predicted for
the launching area, which would

t

(Continued from Page 1)
protection to the marchers and
called on the President for help.
As nightfallcame to Selma,
Army jeeps made their rounds
through the city of 30,000 drop-
ping off single soldiers carrying
rifles to direct troops coming into
town to the national guard armory.
Rev. Martin Luther King, win-
ner of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize,
will lead the huge procession.
Prayer Service
An interdemonational prayer
service is planned earlier as a
prelude to the five-day hike. The
starting point will be the Browns
ChapelrA.M.E. church, headquar-
ters for the right-to-vote cam-
paign which started two months
ago in Selma.
Most of the troops coming into
Selma last night headed directly

prevent necessary photographic
coverage of the launching. Foul
weather also is predicted for some
Atlantic Ocean areas where the
astronauts might land if they had
to abort their mission because of
trouble during the launching
phase.
Operations Director Christopher

to the armory, located about a
mile and one-half south of the
city.
Hundreds of troops appeared to
be camping around Memorial Sta-
dium next to the armory. A news-
man who tried to get into the area
to see what was going on was
turned back by military policemen.
The newsman said the area around
the armory and the football sta-
dium was a solid blanket of mili-
tary vehicles.
Browns Chapel
There were no soldiers around
Browns Chapel, but about a dozen
state trooper cars were in the
area. Troopers also patroled the
remainder of the city.
Word came from Washington
that most of the federal troops
were in their assigned places and
ready for the march.

r

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INTERNATIONAL WEEK IN REVIEW:
Cyprus To Peking...

Ir '1

By ARTHUR COLLINGSWORTH IThe Middle East ...

Tensions in Viet Nam during
the past week have continued to
reverberate on a worldwide scale
- from Ann Arbor discontent to
recent talks in London. Despite
their widespread ramifications,
several other significant events
might be noted with interest.
Moscow and Peking. .
Reactions to the recent demon-
strations at the U.S. Embassy in
Moscow were evident in a series of
heated exchanges between Mos-
cow and Peking. The Chinese
Communist press lambasted Mos-
cow in editorials during the past
few days, charging the Russians
with employing Czarist tactics in
"savagely" beating up Chinese
students in early March, then re-
jecting recent Chinese expressions
of protest with "an arrogant air."
A further complication of Sino-
Soviet relations was the recent
consultative conference of Com-
munist parties held in Moscow.
Communist China was conspic-
uous by its absence along with
the pro-Peking Communist par-
ties from Albania, North Korea,
North Viet Nam, Indonesia, Japan
and unaligned Rumania.
Among those who did attend, a
lack of complete agreement and a
sense of insecurity were apparent
in the communique issued at the
conclusion of the conference.
"The present differences among
the Communists are weakening
their solidarity and causing harm
to the world liberation movement,
to the cause of communism. The
imperialists are attempting to use
in their purposes the differences
in the sociaist community and
the world communist movement,"
it stated.
Latercomments in the Chinese
press seriously questioned the
status of Soviet hegemony in the
Communist world. If Sino-Soviet
feelings are as ruffled as the re-
cent exchanges seem to indicate,
observers wonder what effect re-
cent U.S. activity in Viet Nam
might have on the rift.

In the Middle East, problems
are again brewing. The Cyprus
problem which had temporarily
been arrested by United Nations
intervention, threatens to erupt
into a new boiling pot.
Rumors circulated, last week,
that the Soviet Union may be pro-
viding missles for Cyprus. It was
also speculated that heightened
military activity in Turkey might
force the Greeks to take pre-
emptive action. This sent State
Department representatives scur-
rying to Athens and Ankara.
They are expected to exert
pressure on the Greek Govern-
ment to prevent the emplacement
of the rumored missles. In the
meantime, the United Nations
Emergency Force agreed to re-
main on the island for an extend-
ed three month period.
Arabs and Germans,...
An Arab, Israeli, West German
problem was the subject of a var-
iety of charges and counter-
charges this week. The problem
stemmed from the discovery that
West German arms were being
sent to Israel, followed by a visit
to the United Arab Republic by
East German party boss, Walter
Ulbricht.
This resulted in a threat by the
Arab nations to sever diplomatic
relations with West Germany, a
recognition of the East German
government, and a substantial
trade boycott.
A tense Chancellor Ludwig Er-
hard sought recognition of Israel
which in turn forced the West
German Bundestag to approve a
constitutional amendment ex-
tending the statute of limitations
on the prosecution of Nazi war
criminals in order to pacify Israel.
Peronists Gain...
South of the border, in growing
Argentina the suporters of form-
er dictator Juan Peron won a nar-
row popular victory in last week's
congressional elections but failed

to gain control from the Peoples
Radical Party which suports in-
cumbent President Arturo Illia.
Despite the strong showing by
the Peronists, it is very doubtful
if the military will permit them
to assume any major posts. Eco-
nomic complications combined
with the political developments,
have hinged political stability on
the ability of Peronists to make
themselves politically palatable.
This resurgence of Peronist
strength might bolster the spirit
of Peron, now living in exile in
Spain. He might even consider
making a return dash, as he tried
unsuccessfully last year when he
was halted in Brazil.
Labor Survives, but...
Prime Minister Harold Wilson
of Great Britain, seemed to be
stirring his cup of tea with a
steady hand, despite developments
in the House of Commons last
week which might seriously short-
en his stay at No. 10 Downing.
He is also worried about the
failure of the British talks with
Soviet Foreign Minister Andre ii
A. Gromyko to reach any real ac-
cord on the Viet Nam problem.
With a majority of less than
half a dozen votes, the Commons
seems headed toward a stormy
period of trench warfare. Wilson,
elected last October, has not in-
troduced any bills embodying his
election pledges.
Therefore, if he is forced into
an election later this year and
has to go to the electorate empty-
handed, he will be in a rather pre-
carious position for a man who
was elected as a take-charge poli-
tician.

World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
SAIGON-Police investigating a
plot to bomb the United States
embassy raided a house in Saigon
yesterday and found 35 pounds
of plastic explosives. A U.S.
spokesman said first reports in-
dicated the explosives were in-
tended for use against an Ameri-
can installation.
The raid on the house in Sai-
gon came after the arrest of two
Viet Cong agents caught riding a
scooter truck toward the U.S.
embassy with 25 pounds of plastic
explosives.
Police quoted the men as say-
ing their mission was to park
the scooter outside the embassy
and set a timer on the plastic
explosives. Police reported the
timer was set for noon, when
Americans leave for lunch.
Vietnamese authorities, noting
a slack-off in fighting in the
field, reported increased sabotage
activities, especially against rail-
roads. They gave no details.
JAKARTA, Indonesia - Four
Western oil companies were for-
mally notified yesterday that In-
donesian government "authority
and supervision" has been impos-
ed on their operations in this
country.
Reliable sources said the oil
companies were assured that their
"property rights are fully guaran-
teed."
WASHINGTON - Sen. Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont) predicted
yesterday that at least 80 sena-
tors will support the administra-
tion's voting rights bill when it
comes up for Senate passage, pos-
sibly next month.

C. Kraft Jr. said no decision on
a weather postponement would
be made until closer to firing
time.
The goal of the two-man Gem-
ini launching program is to ex-
pose astronauts to the space ele-
ments. On the second flight,
scheduled in June, an astronaut
is to stick his head out of his
spacecraft's portal to test the
a n
air",
Grissom, a 36-year-old Air
Force major, and 34-year-old
N a v y lieutenant commander
Young hope to claim a space first
for the United States-one which
Cape Kennedy officials say is as
important to manned lunar voy-
ages as the ability to leave an
orbiting ship.
Grissom
Grissom, as command pilot, is
to maneuver t h e spacecraft
through space, flying it back-
wards, forwards, sideways and up-
side down in an attempt to prove
its ability to make future long-
duration and rendezvous flights.
Two orbit shifts in which Gris-
som is to manually alter his or-
bital path are also scheduled.
None of the previous six
Americans or 11 Russians who
flew into space had the ability
to maneuver their craft from the
orbital path determined by the
booster rocket.
Grissom and Young spent yes-
terday reviewing the filght plan
and attending mission status
briefings which included reports
on the readiness of the Titan 2
booster rocket, the 7,000-pound
Gemini craft, the worldwide
tracking network and the recovery
fleet.
Grissom will control the space-
craft, nicknamed the "Molly
Brown" for all but 20 minutes of
the flight. Young will execute
maneuvers during that period. But
the role of the junior astronaut
primarily will be to test systems
such as the space suit, tempera-
ture controls, and the dispensing
of food.
Grissom will be able to pick his
own landing spot and, with the
help of a small computer aboard
the spacecraft, guide the capsule
to an Atlantic ocean landing near
Grand Turk Island.
The official name of the space-
HoW to
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craft is "Gemini 3," to denote
the third flight in the Gemini
series. The previous two were un-
manned test flights. The astro-
nauts gave the spacecraft its nick-
name-from the Broadway show
and movie "The Unsinkable MollyI
Brown" in pointed reference to
Grissom's Mercury capsule, Lib-
erty Bell 7, which sank after his
suborbital flight in July, 1961.
Congressional Report
M e a n w h i 1 e, a congressional
committee released a two-year-
old report yesterday accusing the
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration of withholding in-
UNITARIAN STUDENT GROUP
Presents
DR. JOHNBARDACH
Zoology & Fishery Dept.
SUNDAY, March 28th
"For want of a nail the
shoe is lost . . ." Herbert
THOUGHTS ON ECOLOGY
DISCUSSION & REFRESHMENTS
TO FOLLOW
Cars at Lloyd & Union
at 6:45 P.M.
UN ITARIAN
STUDENT GROUP
1917 Washtenaw
Sun. 7:00, Mar. 21
CECIL L. EUBANKS
Political Science
"An unjust law is no law
at all . . ." Augustine
Discussion & Refreshments
at 6:45 P.M.
Cars at Lloyd & Union

Sun. P.M. Back to campus

... .
- --- -- - -- -- - --- - 1

CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE SERIES
AT THE
GABRIEL RICHARD CENTER
MARCH 14th to APRIL 4th
Sunday, March 21, 7:30 p.m.
"The Physical and Medical Aspects of Marriage"
Dr. John O'Sullivan
Dr. Gena Rose Pahucki
Wednesday, March 24, 8:00 p.m.
"Christian Conscience and Birth Control"
Msgr. John F. Bradley, Ph.D.
Sunday, March 28, 7:30 p.m.
"The Psychological Adjustments in Marriage"
Paul Hickey, M.S.W., A.C.S.W.
Wednesday, March 31, 8:00 p.m.
"The Successful Ecumenical Marriage"
Msgr. John F. Bradley, Ph.D.

formation on Russian space activ-
ities from the American people.
A committee spokesman said
the findings are still valid. The
report is based on hearings held
by a foreign operations and gov-
ernment information subcommit-
tee in the spring of 1963.
The report said the committee's
investigations fully substantiate
complaints from news media rep-
resentatives that the U.S. space
agency withheld information con-
cerning Soviet space activities
"which, by law and consistent
with national security, should
have been made public."
How to spend a weekend
in Chicago for $16
- JUDY CIAPMAN
Western College
Oxford, Ohio
.. > says, ~Any
student, man
or woman,can
stay at
Chicago's
YMCA Hotel
andenoa
weekend for
:<#>s~s?$16.00. Here is
Fri.P.M. Dinner at YMCA Hotel $1.25
Chicago Symphony 2.50
Room at Y Hotel 2.95
Sat.A.M. Breakfast at Y Hotel .58
Art Institute Tour Free
Lunch at Stouffer's 1.45
Sat. P.M. Nat. Hist. Museum Tour Free
Dinner at Y Hotel 1.25
Sat. nite dance, Y Hotel .15
Coke date .45
Room at Y Hotel 2.95
Sun. A.M. Breakfast at Y Hotel .58
Worship at Central Church
Lunch at Y Hotel 1.30

klVeeftz&",ate
(and, casually speaking,
you find them everywhere.)

MEN * WOMEN * FAMILIES
Stay at Chicago's
YMCA HOTEL
826 South Wabash
at the edge of the Loop
accommodations for 2,000 * rates $2.95and up
Write for reservations or call 22.3183

Total $15.41

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The "Big M" will
do OK-so just
relax by the tube
this weekend in your

Sunday, April 4,

7:30 p.m.

''The Formation of a Christian Home"
Mr. and Mrs. John Baum
Mr. annd Mrs. John Feldkamp

The Marriage series is open to everyone, but a special invitation
invitation is extended to all seniors and those couples contem-
plating marriage within the next six months.

11

r

Thomas Hilbish conducting
ARTS CHORALE
THE SYMPHONIC CHOIR

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PROF. HAROLD K. SCHILLING
Prof. of Physics,
Pennsylvania State University,
Author & Lecturer & "University Professor"
"ON SCIENCE AND RELIGION
MAKING COMMON CAUSE"
Lecture I. "In the Quest of Understanding"

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Harold K. Schilling, "Univer-
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formerly Dean of The Grad-
uate School, at the Pennsyl-
vania State University, holds
two honorary doctorates of

MONDAY, 7:30 P.M.

J

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