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March 20, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

--

SATURDAY, 20 MARCH 1965

THlE MICHIGAN DAILYV

Wallace 'Opens Door' for Tuesday Launching.
Federal Control of Guard Another Milestone?
ICAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (A)-- -

TI

'he Perfect Gift

MONTGOMERY. Ala. ()-Gov.I
George C. Wallace opened the
door wide yesterday for Presi-
dent Lyndon B. Johnson to feder-
alize the Alabama National Guard
for security during a civil rights
march.
But Wallace stopped short of

asking the President to take the
step. In a telegram to Johnson,
the governor said he himself was
willing to call up the guard but
the state couldn't afford it.
And in Selma, city police adopt-
ed a new tactic and took more
than 350 civil rights demonstra-

-Associated Press

MORE THAN 500 MARCHERS crowded on the steps and side-
walk in front of the Selma city hall yesterday after staging a.
protest march. Civil rights supporters in Selma are scheduled to
start a march from Selma to Montgomery on Sunday to protest
Alabama voting laws.
SECOND STRIKE:
U.S. Planes Hit Targets
In North Viet Nam Raid
SAIGON, Viet Nam (/P)-Land-based United States Air Force
and carrier-based Navy planes pounded military targets at two
inland points deep in North Viet Nam yesterday.
It was the second strike against North Viet Nam in five days.
Yesterday's was the seventh raid of a series launched against the
North Vietnamese Communists since Feb. 7. (The United States
Defense Department said in Washington that the United States

tors into "protective custody"
when they tried to picket the
home of Mayor Joseph T. Smith-
erman.
"We have had trouble with you
folks before," the city public safe-
ty director, Wilson Baker, told the
demonstrators, "and we are tak-
ing you into custody to protect
you."
Baker said he could hold them
as long as necessary to protect
them.
The picketing attempt follow-
ed a statement from the demon-
strators that they would go into
white residential sections in an
effort to draw white citizens into
biracial talks.
Legislature Acts
Wallace said in the telegram'
he concurred with resolutions
adopted by the Alabama Legisla-
ture. They said the federal gov-
ernment should bear the costs
since a federal judge has permit-
ted the Selma - Montgomery
march.
The United States government
would pay the costs only if the
guard is placed under federal
control.
The implication clearly was that
Wallace and the legislature want-
ed the guard federalized.
The President, keeping in close
touch at his Texas ranch, had
said Thursday night he would
call up the guard if Wallace was
unable or unwilling to do so.
Telegram
Wallace's telegram:
"Mr. President, I am willing
to do whatever is necessary to
maintain peace and order, in-
cluding calling the Alabama Na-
tional Guard .However, our state
is financially unable to bear this
burden. Therefore, I respectfully
inform you that I do concur witY-
the actions of the Alabama Leg-
islature."
Wallace sent the telegram
shortly after U.S. District Judge
Frank M. Johnson, Jr. in Mont-
gomery turned down the gover-
nor's request to stay the order
permitting the 50-mile march
starting Sunday.
Little Rock
In another civil rights conflict
yesterday in Little Rock, Ark.,
state troopers massed into a hu-
man battering ram and threw
about 25 Negroes and whites out
of the state capitol basement aft-
er someone lobbed a gas grenade
into the demonstration..
Robert Whitfield led the grout
to the basement and requested
permissionato enter the cafeteria.
It was refused.
The cafeteria has been operated
as a private club since shortly
after passage, of the Civil Rights
Act last July.

Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom and
John W. Young still will fly the
world's first maneuverable man-
ned spacecraft on their weather-
threatened orbital flight schedul-
ed Tuesday.
This "space first" for the Unit-
ed States was practically assured
yesterday when Russian cosmo-
nauts Pavel Belyayev and Alexei
Leonov returned to earth with-
out conducting any orbit shifting
maneuvers with their Voskhod
capsule.
Grissom and Young plan to fly
their Gemini 3 craft backwards.
forwards and sideways and changr
orbital paths as they test for
future long-duration and rendez-
vous flights.
Spectacular
Success of the mission would be
as spectacular a feat as Leonov'r
exit into space Thursday on the
end of a tether. Both techniques
must be developed for manned
lunar landing flights.
No previous American or Rus-
sian manned spacecraft had thr
ability to change orbital path
Grissom, as command pilot, wi>
alter his course by up to 50 miles
by firing jet-like engines.
Astronaut exposure to the space
elements is a goal of the Gemin'
program and on the second man-
ned flight, scheduled in June, as-
tronaut James A. McDivitt is to at
least partially emerge from hi
spacecraft.
The weather forecast for Tues-
day's launch, however, remained
gloomy.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
MOSCOW -- Rebellious Soviet
voters in 199 districts rejected
local government candidates pick-
ed by the Communist party for
unopposed election, official re-
ports showed yesterday.
New elections will have to bi?
held in the districts where candi-
dates failed to get absolute ma-
jorities in last Sunday's polling.
* * *
WASHINGTON - The SenatP
Finance Committee unanimously
approved President Lyndon B.
Johnson's nomination of Henry
F. Fowler as secretary of the
Treasury.
* * *
TOKYO-Red China declared
yesterday that the recent meeting
of Communist leaders in Moscow
was a "serious step" to split the
international Communist move.
ment.

,;
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A MONOGRAMMED PIN
Engraved at no extra charge
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ASTRONAUT GRISSOM

I I

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il

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Creative Arts Festival
ROBERT LOWELL
MARCH 20...8:30 P.M.... HILL AUDITORIUM
Acclaimed by nany as the best poet now writing in English, Robert Lowell's poetry is a
poetry of "coming to terms," of intense and often violent struggle with the most ele-
mentary, the most profound questions. It ranges back in guilt-laden examination of the
New England past, forward to the horrors of the totalitarian state, of war, of shattered
faith. Nothing escapes his eye, little remains unexamined. Yet if he catalogues life's
absurdities, at the same time, he is aware of its wonders, its joys, and sings their praise,
Tickets $1 at: Bookstores, Union Desk
After 7:30 at Hill Box Office

19

for any Qccasion

Takes Control
Of U.S., Dutch
Oil Companies'
JAKARTA, Indonesia (W)
Spurred by Communist agitation,
President Sukarno announced
yesterday the Indonesian govern-
ment is taking over management
of two United States oil compan-
ies and one Dutch firm.
The three companies are Cal-
tex and Stanvac, both Ameri-
can-owned, and Shell Oil, large-
ly Dutch-owned. Their installa-
tions are worth several hundred
million dollars.
Sukarno made his decision ir
less than 15 minutes in a meet-
ing with Third Deputy Premier
Chaerul Saleh, who also is min-
ister of basic industries and min-
ing, in charge of the oil indus-
try.
Communist Victory
Diplomatic observers here con-
sidered the takeover of the oil1
companies another victory for
the Indonesian Communist party
It has been agitating and lead-
ing demonstrations against for-
eign interests-notably American.
Sukarno told newsmen "we arc
'taking over the management" of9
the three companies. This is thel
usual term used in the takeover
of foreign properties.
Experts there say it simply
amounts to confiscation.
The government is expected tc
try to arrange for foreign em-1
ployes to continue to operate the.
oil companies under figurehead
Indonesian managers. Govern-
ment officials said the manage-i
ment_ of the three companies
would work under government su-
pervision.
Negotiations
The government is trying to ne-
gotiate such an arrangement for
the $80 million in U.S. rubber
plantations seized last month ir
northern Sumatra.
Sukarno said nothing about
compensation. The government
has taken the position in previ-
ous takeovers that it owes noth-
ing because it is only assuming
the management.
American oilmen were taken by
surprise. One American oil execs,-
tive who refused to be identified
by name said "this is expropria-
tion."
It was not known what prompt-
?d Sukarno to take the measure
against the oil companies at this
time.
In the course of the past month
the government has seized ane
closed United States government
libraries in Indonesia.

has changed its policy and now is
using napalm-jellied petroleum
fire bombs-against some North
Vietnamese targets. Napalm was
used on Monday's raid and on at
least one of two targets hit today,
officials said.)
Military Targets
A United States statement said
"the targets were Phu Van and
Vinh Son, where there are a num-
ber of military supply installa-
tions." A spokesman added the
Navy planes also attacked the Thu
An supply depot, adjoining the
Vinh Son area.
A United States Air Force
spokesman said approximately 60
Air Force planes and 50 to 75
carrier-based Navy jet and pro-
peller-driven planes from the
United States 7th fleet participat-
ed in the raid. He said the weather
was good and no enemy planes
were sighted.
The Air Force spokesman said
the raid had been very successful
and up to 100 per cent of the tar-
gets had been destroyed.
Russian Position
In London, Soviet Foreign Min-
ister Andrei A. Gromyko reiterated
that an end to United States mili-
tary action is the essential first
step toward achieving a solution
of the Viet Nam crisis. In a fare-
well news conference before re-
turning to Moscow, he said there
could be no question of calling an
international conference on Viet
Nam at this time.
On the political front, the Sai-
gon government for the first time
deported three suspected Com-
munists to North Viet Nam. With
22 loudspeakers along the border
branding the three Communist
traitors, Brig. Gen. Nguyen Chanh
Thi escorted them to the 700-foot
bridge over the Ben Hai River
border and sent them across to
waiting North Vietnamese guards.
Security restrictions on air
operations in and around South
Viet Nam remained tight.
Welcome
to
Continental
Hairstyling
"Your Hair Problems
Are Our Care !"
Open All Day Saturday
Visit
The Dascola Barbers
(near Michigan Theatre)
or
The U of M Barbers
(North U near Kresge's)
------

COyMEd J TO CHURCH
ON T H E SAJBBA T H
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH LUTHERAN STUDENT
AND STUDENT CENTER State and William AND CHAPEL

CENTER

Graduating
engineers &
scientists:
Jo"in IBM's
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,
training program
Become a problem-solver and advisor to
users of IBM computer systems in areas
such as:
* real-time control of industrial processes
* communications-based information
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" time-shared computer systems
- graphic data processing
* computer-controlled manufacturing
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* management operating systems
. engineering design automation
All engineering and scientific disciplines are
needed. IBM will give you comprehensive
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job. Openings are available in all principal
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For more information see your placement
director, or call the nearest IBM branch
office. If you prefer, write to C. R. Graham,
IBM Corporation, 76 Adams Ave. W., Detroit,
Michigan 48226.

(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Stephen J. Stein, Vicar
Parents' Day Worship Services - Sunday at
9:45 and 11:15 a.m. - "Families That
Glorify God."
Buffet at 1:00.
Lenten Vespers-Wednesday Evening at 7:30
and 10:00-"They Led Him Away."
Fourth Friday Forum-Friday Evening at 8:30
"The Christian in the Business World."
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Church School and Services at 9:30' and 11:00
a.m.--Special Services in Celebration of
Spring.
ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone 662-4097
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
Breakfast at Canterbury House.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer and commentary.
TUESDAY
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
ASH WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Choral Litany in procession and
Evensong
FRIDAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 a.m., 10:15 a.m. and 12:40 p.m.
Penitential Office and Holy Communion
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen, John Waser
9:30 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 90 years of age.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday morning church service.

Services at 9:30 and i11:15 a.m. - Sermon
Title: "Meaning of the Cross," The Rev.
C. H. Loucks.
Bible Lecture, 10:35 a.m. Dr. Preston Slosson
Church School, 9:30 a.m., crib-ninth grade,
11:15 a.m., crib-sixth grade.
Student Guild, 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189.
DISCIPLES OF CHRIST
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
730 Tappan 662-4245
Russell M. Fuller, Pastor
Sunday Worship-10:45 a.m.
Monday--Buffet Luncheon at 12 noon. "That
Was The Week That Was."
CAMPUS CENTER GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe 662-5189
J. E. Edwards, Campus Minister
7:00 p.m. Sunday - Seminar on Historic
Christian Thought.

National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Pastors: Henry 0. Yoder
Norman A. Erikson
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.--Worship Services.
9:30 a.m.-Study Group.
5:30 p.m.-Supper-Informal Meeting.
WEDNESDAY, 7:15 p.m.-Lenten Vespers.
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
493 S. Fourth St.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Rizer,
and Rev. A. G. Hobermehl, Pastors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.--Worship Serv
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.--Church Schoo
7:30 p.m.-Student Guild.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenaw
The Rev. Donald Postema
Morning Service, 10:00 a.m.-"A Tranquilizer
for Disturbed Disciples."
Evening Service, 7:00 p.m.--"The Touchstone
for all Life."

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:15 a.m.
Holy Communion - Second Sunday ofe
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class--9:45e
Holy Baptism--First Sunday of month.
Nursery facilities during worship services
church school.

each
a.m.
and
9:30,
7:00,

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
SUNDAY - Masses at 7:00, 8:15,
10:45, 12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY - Masses at
8:00, 9:00, 12:00 and 5:00 p.m.

9
7

WEDNESDAY - 7:30 p.m.-Marian Scripture
Devotions. Confessions following.
SATURDAY - Confessions: 3:30-5:30; 7:30-
9:30 p.m.

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH and
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Jean Robe Bissell, Associate Campus
Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and I1:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "The Will of God.."
10:15 a.m.-Worship and Program,
Lounge. Four discussion groups -
Church in Politics," "Theology,"
Gospel According to Peanuts," "
in Art Forms."
TUESDAY
8:30 p.m.-Open House, Jean Bissell'
ment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel,
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out i
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Din
ner. "Methodist Professor Series," D
Thomas Riggs.
THURSDAY
12:00 noon-Class, Wesley Lounge. "Shapers
of Contemporary Theology," Mrs. Bissell.
Lunch 25c.
FRIDAY
6:00 p m. - Young Marrieds, PineRoom.1

SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12.
Presbyterian Church Center located
church.

BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron 663-9376
Paul W. Licht. Campus Minister
James H. Middleton, Senior Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m.-Campus Class-"Psychology of
Religion," Professor W. J. McKeachie.
11:00 a.m.-Worship-First Baptist Church.
6:45 p.m. -- Meet at the Baptist Campus
Center for transportation to the Pres-
byterian Campus Center. "American En-
volvement in Viet Nam: An Appraisal,"

I

at the

DI AME TF% VICUITDII"AMIA

i}

THE CHURCH OF CHRISTj

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