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March 20, 1965 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-20

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAII,

SATURDAY. 28 MARCH 1991K

_- T OT E IHC A B INSATfl1V9tT-AV ~t
C a TT Z w er . -.a r.° . . - -_ .

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)AILY CURCULATION: Fader Receives Contract
Give', R n of -R ader !urve To"E Vrlu te C rii t l1f

'%-J XILX-./&4WA

By ROBERT LEDERER
A recent survey indicates that
three-quarters of University stu-
dents and faculty read The Daily
at least once a week. Nearly one-
half of the students and nearly
one-third of the faculty read the
paper "regularly" (5-6 times per
week), the report adds.
The survey shows that 25 per
cent of the students and 20 per
cent of the faculty read The Daily
rarely or never.
The survey was conducted last
fall by 19 students enrolled in In-
troduction to Survey Research,
under the instruction of Director
of the Survey Research Center
Frank M. Andrews. The purpose of
the project was "to collect in-
formation which might be useful
in guiding the plans and policies
of the Michigan Daily," Andrews
said.
Questionnaires
Questionnaires were issued to
students and to faculty to achieve
"an effective student sample" (1:9
per cent) and "an effective fac-
ulty sample" (5.6 per cent).
The survey did not include the
opinions of Ann Arbor towns-
rove Plan
To-Increase I
Student Wages
(Continued from Page 1)
get under the new bills.

people, parents, alumni or the'
nonacademic staff of the Univer-
sity.
The survey includes an analysisE
of the student who reads The
Daily regularly. According to the
report, such a student is "an un-
married undergraduate, living in
a residence hall, apartment, fra-
ternity or sorority, and enrolled
in the literary college or the school
of education."
Married students, graduate stu-
dents, engineering students, and
those living in rooming houses or
in private homes "tend to read the
paper less frequently or not at-all."
Regular Reader
The regular student reader is
active in social or political clubs
and displays average attendance
at cultural events, movies, dances
and parties, the survey reports.
The faculty reader compares
with his student counterpart in

~.L kJ uU.l Ty _/. j l V q. L14 GL L .'U' Y1_4LL/IU LU LLEL II1/
the readers purchase newsstand (Continued from Page 1 ceptable both to society and to
issues. tor in the curriculum uses news- nthes vd.ar
Non-Subscribers papers, magazines, and paper-' In the two and a half year ex-
Theses tutswho do not sub- ound books as teaching devices, Faeinati of the English program,
scribe to The Daily indicate satis- and every instructor teaches every todB.Mceihe pycology
faction with alternative news student how to write. pton B. McNeil of the psychology
sources as the primary reason and, Faculty Groups valars, and Pr Morton H.
to a lesser extent, dissatisfaction This is accomplished by organ- Shaevitz of the same department
with the quality and coverage or izing small faculty groups around whose special interest is the psy-
price of the paper. each English teacher for the pu cooy fmtiain
As a news source, students rank e E it rtn chology of motivation
The Daily second to informal con- forts in all classrooms within the Graduate students in clinical'
tacts, while faculty members con- group. The effect of having every psychology will do some of their
sider informal contacts and The student write three times a week work at the school, and McNeil
Ann Arbor News more important (no matter how briefly) in every and Prof. William ,C. Morse of
media to rely upon. Eighty-two classroom, Fader believes, should educational psychology will offer
per cent of the student regulars be the powerful reinforcement of a joint graduate seminar next
and 71 per cent of the faculty the idea that English is not a sub- autumn in "Dynamics of Delin-
regulars think The Daily a "very ject taught in one class once a quent Children" which will use
important" source of University day, and therefore easily ignored, the English program as its chief
information. Seventy-one per cent but that English is a skill and a study material.
of student nonreaders and 47 per tool to be used in every situation.
--- r r - -Successful

APPOINTMENT

The Regents yesterday approved
the appointment of John C.
Feldkamp as assistant to the
vice-president for student af-
fairs, effective March 1.

Regents See
'Wisdom' in
Recent Plan
(Continued from Page 1)
25, similar to the FCSWV pro-
gram.
Sahlins also said that FCSW'
is in contact with about 25 other
universities from California t,
Massachusetts, and prospects foi
similar cooperation are encourag-
ing,
Cooperating
Thus far the administration
seems to be cooperating with the
University's teach-in. John Bing-
ley, director of student affair;
and organizations, announced yes-
terday that women students plan-
ning to atted the all night teach-
in could request permission frorr
their house directors.
Prof. Arnold Kaufmann of the
philosophy department, who is
handling the arrangements fozi
the teach-in, released additional
details yesterday.
Three speakers have been sign-
ed up so far to address partici-
pants at the teach-in: Prof. John
Donahue of the anthropology de
partment of Michigan State Uni-
versity, who did field work witi-
the Vietnamese; Herbert Browne
formerly with the Agency of In
ternational Development in Viet
Nam, and now with Fairleigh
Dickinson University in New Jer-
sey, and Arthur Waskow from the
Institute for Policy Studies ir

cent of faculty nonreaders con-
sider the paper "unimportant or
fairly unimportant."

"Give these boys some better!
reason to learn than authority,!
whatever its form; let them dis-

1
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most respects. Newly-established Preferred Items cover that reading and writing are
faculty members such as lecturers The items that attract the most as natural and necessary to their
and instructors and the long- student interest in order of pref- existence as fighting or driving a
established full professors exhibit erence are University news, en- car. One result may be that they'll
a "marked tendency" to read The tertainment news and interna- teach themselves to read and
Daily more frequently than assis- tional news. The faculty also write."
tant or associate professors, the favors University and entertain- Fader goes on to characterize
report adds. ment news but relies on other most of the boys at the training
The survey also indicates how sources for international news. school as "carefully illiterate,"
students who read The Daily ob- Sports, special features and the protecting themselves against fur-
tain their copies. Only 23 per cent Daily Official Bulletin also com- ther abject failure by erecting a
have personal subscriptions while mand a large following. wall of total incompetence be-
24 per cent share a subscription The least frequently read sec- tween themselves and language-
with a friend or roommate, and tions are ads, local news, special amongst many other things.
30 per cent use a large group supplements and the magazine. Breech Barrier
subscription through a dormitory Both students and faculty gave "If we can breech this barrier'
or fraternity for example. Eigh- a low rating to news of other with language," he said, "perhaps
teen per cent rely on another universities, state news, local news we can give them the verbal skills'

"If this program proves uc-
cessful, it can be adapted with
very little modification for junior
and senior high curricula," Fader
said.
He pointed out that such a
program would serve to satisfy
the most serious criticism now
leveled at the public schools:
That they do a better and better
job of preparing the good student
for college while they do a pro-
gressively worse job of preparing
the less able student for life.
"Given the means of teaching the
student who should not go on to
college, the teachers who do such
a good job with the college-bound
are very likely to be equally suc-
cessful with the student who ter-
minates his education in high
school," he said.
ETI N

S
8 p.i
will be
delosse
8 p.n
tional
will sp
in the
in Ann
8:30
ning p

Across
Campus
ATURDAY, MARCH 20
m.-Mozart's "Magic Flute"
e presented in Lydia Men-
ohn Theatre.
m.-Rev. James Farmer. na-
executive director of CORE,
eak on "The Current Crisis
Struggle for Human Rights"
Arbor High School Aud.
p.m.-Pulitzer prize win-
oet and playwright Robert

AT ANN ARBOR S
NEWEST BOOKSTORE
the poetry of
WARREN
BERRYMAN
LOWELL
contemporary literature
scholarly editions
in the humanities
french and german books
Mocm 1POeuy
1321 South University
between Forest & Washtenaw
open noon to midnight
Monday through Saturday
Available
at
SLATERS,
All
Cliff's Notes
available
at
WAHR'S

r

Lowell will read poetry in Hill

person's copy. Five per cent of'

and editorials.

By paying a wage of $1.25, the r.:::r; ";::::..:<"::^ ,::":::
Ujniversity will be ,in effect, meet- .
ing the demands for higher pay byf
such student groups as the Uni-
versity of Michigan Student Em-D
plyes Union. However, President
pr'eSSu'e groups did not play a The Daily Official Bulletin is an pathy torchlight march and dem
significant role in securing the official publication of The Univer- stration, March 21, 9 p.m., Campust
wage hike; rather the pay raise sity of Michigan, for which The Diagonal.
had been under consideration in- Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
dependently by the administration. ial responsibility. Notices should be Lecture: Harold K. Schilling,p
He noted that President Lyndon sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to fessor of physics, Pennsylvania St
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be- University, author and lecturer,1
B. Johnson's higher wage pro- fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding speak "On Science and Religion M
grams had spurred the University publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday, ing Common Cause" in the second
to raise pay rates to $1.25 next for Saturday and Sunday. General two lectures, "In the Realm of Mora
Notices may be published a maxi- at 4:10 p.m. in the Multipurpose R
fall rather than the previous plan mum of two times on request; Day of the Undergraduate Library. P
to raise wage rates gradually. Calendar items appear once only. Schilling is sponsored by the Unit
Former Plan Student organization notices are not I sity of Michigan, Office of Religi
The former plan, revealed in accepted for publication. Affairs.
mid-November by Pierpont called SATURDAY, MARCH 20 Lectureships in Foreign Universit
for an increase of the minimum Available to U.S. citizens are lis
wage to $1.15 by Jan. 1, 1966 and t[by the Committee on International
an additional raise to $1.25 by i General NoticO es change of Persons. A copy of the
may be consulted in the GraduateI
Jan. 1, 1967. housing: Graduate and undergradu- lowship Office, Room 110 Rackham.
UMSEU President Barry Blue- ate students now on campus who do
stone, '66, commented yesterday not have a housing commitment for > CU ? en
that while the "UMSEU is pleased the Spring-Summer Term, 1965, may
by the administration's action, it apply for housing in residence hails POSITION OPENINGS: '
concerned with the possible theOffice of the Director of Resi- Navy Dept.-Civilian job opportL
Is conceb enteHalls, 3011 SAB, beginning Mon., i-k TnnntM in ., ~ qAnd E d

to meet society in ways more ac-
IAL flB"ULLI

Aud. Washington, D.C.
8:30 p.m.-Fay Batts will give a Conference
piano recital at the School of From 8 p.m. until midnight o'
Music Recital Hall. She will play Wednesday a conference open to
works by Bach, Beethoven, Ravel, the public is scheduled; the thre
and Alexius. speakers will then consider basic
9 p.m.-The International Stu- issues of the Viet Nam problem.
dent Association's Monte Carlo At midnight, the group will
Ball will be held in the Union. move outside to the Diag wherc
SUNDAY, MARCH 21 Prof. Frithjof Bergman of the
2:30 p.m. - Mozart's "Magic philosophy department and sev-
Flute" will be presented in Lydia eral others will speak.
Mendelssohn Theatre. About 1:30 a.m. the demonstra
3 p.m. - John Berryman will tors will move inside for a series
read his poetry at the Union. of seminars, interspersed with re
7 and 9 p.m.--Cinema Guild will freshments and folksinging.
present Glenn Ford and Jack Finally, from 7-8 a.m. or
Lemmon in "Cowboy" at the Thursday morning, there will be
Architecture Aud a demonstration on the Diag.

I: - - - - - - - - - - - - - .

on- 17.FSEE required.
and Physician's Office, Riverside, Calif.
-Female Med. Tech., either registered
or eligible, to start May or June, for
pro- private practice, exper. not required.
tate Illinois Civil Service-Careers in state
will gov't. in Bus.. Educ., Social Sciences,
Aak- psych. Health, Library and Tech. field.
d of for college grads, men & women. On-
als," the-job trug, with opportunity to work
oom with professional & gov't. leaders. Open'
rof. to non-residents, through merit exam.
ver- *

ious
ies:
sted
Ex-
list
Fel-
uni-

increase in tu4tion and residenceE
hall payments."
Dial 662-6264
Shown at 1:05
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05

rounder
- js
wrnggIer
ang ir
gals
Au6D0 HO ~DAYWLL
SANA&SOm JMERRCOEONR \
TOM & JERRY CARTOON

March 22. Applications will be avail-
able from 9-12 and 1-5 week-days
thereafter.
Graduate and Undergraduate: Wom-
en students now on campus who do
not have a housing commitment for
the Spring-Summer Term, 1965, may,
apply for housing in sororities and co-
operative houses at the Office of As-
sociated and Affiliated Housing, 1011
SAB, beginning March 22, 1965. Ap-
plications will be available from 9-121
and 1-5 each weekday thereafter.
School of Music Recital Cancella-
tions: The following two recitals for
Sun., March 21, have been canceled.
John Carlson, organist: Hill Aud., 4:15
p.m. Franchot Young, pianist: Recital
Hall, School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has be-
come effective.
Approval request forms for student-
sponsored events are available in Room
1 1011 of the SAB.
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Sym-
CONTINUOUS i POPULAR
PERFORMANCESI I PRICESI
STANLEY KRAMER "ITr, A
MAD,
UTRA MAD,MAD,
PANAYSIOr AD A
TECHNICOLO MA M
UNITED ARTISTS WORLD
Prices This Attraction Only
Matinees $1.25
Eves. & Sun. $1.50

tieO ioca tain mast ana some over
seas, Positions Include Librarians,
Transportation Officer, Computer Pro
grammer, Education Specialist, Ac-
countants, Engrs., Geologist, Naval
Arch., etc.
' International Atomic Energy Comm
-Requests from govts. of the Congo,
U.A.R., Yugoslavia & several So. Amer-
ican countries for specialists in many
fields including Radiobiol., Atomic En-
ergy Planning, Nuclear electronics.
power des. & const., & spectroscopy
Assignments from 3-12 months.
k. A. Bower Theatre, Flint, Mich.
-Positions available in new resident
professional theatre company. Four
productions from June 14 through Aug.
21. Openings include director, actors,
stage manager, seamstress, etc. Salary.
Application deadline April 30.
Croft Education Services, New Lon-
don, Conn. - Field Repres. to trave
Michigan. Man with bkgd. in school
admin. and/or teaching. Age 31-54.
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base,
Ohio-Attn.: Seniors-Data Processing
Trainees. Grads with degree in Math,
Indust. Engrg., Bus. Ad.. Data Proc-
essing for digital computer Program-
mers. 12 month trng. prog, begins June

For further information, please cal
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 sXA--
Summer Jobs Starting May I or0soo
er: 1. Brass Rail, N.Y. World's Fair. 2.
Yosemite National Park. 3. Good Hu
mor Co., Detroit, Chicago, N.Y.C.,
Wash., Baltimore, Phila., etc. 4. Cedar
Point Funderland, Sandusky, Ohio. 5
Hudson's, Detroit. 6. Crowley's, Detroit
7. door-to-door selling job.
'TEACHER PLACEMENT:
Detroit, Mich, (South Redford School
Dist.)-Elem. Vocal Music 22 or 2;
day week-start March 22 or immedi-
ately.
Ypsilanti, Mich.-Elem. Vocal Musi-
-start May 1 or sooner.
Fruitport, Mich.-Band-start imme-
diately.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Apnointments, Educ
Div., 3200 SAB, 764-7462.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please

sign schedule posted at 128-H West
E'ranrm.
MARCH 24-
Moore Business Forms, Angola, Ind
-BS: IE & ME. Machine & MethodsI
Des. & Improvement.
MARCH 26-
Clark, Dietz( Painter & Assoc., Ur-
bana, Ill.-BS: CE. MS: Sanitary. April
grads.
Ohio Injector Co., Wadsworth, Ohio
-BS: IE & ME. Dev. & Prod.
Part-lintic
The following part-time jobs are
available. Application for these jobs
can be made in the Part-Time Em-
ployment Office, 2200 SAB, during the
following hours: Monday through Fri
day. 8 a.m. until 12 noon and 1:30
until 5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring stu-
dents for part-time or -full-time tem-
porary work, should contact Robert
Parker, part-time interviewer, at 764-
7283.
Students desiring miscellaneous od'
jobs should consult the bulletin
board in Room 2200, daily.
2-Technical typists to work full-
time beginning immediately and
working through summer.
1-Typist to work full-time on a spe-
cial report. Job will last approx.
3 weeks.
-Also, there are several part-time
typist and secretarial positions
available to be filled immediately.
These with typing speeds of 50
w pm. or over should apply at
once.

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Buy
Cliff's Notes
at
FOLLETTS

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ANNOUNCING
Funnier than you know what
mr literarv than u know what e lse

Jerry Badanes
POETRY READING sponsored by GENERATION
TUESDAY, MARCH 23-8:00 P.M.
THE MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM

I

ORGANIZATION Coming March 25
NOTICES
Use of This Column for Announce- L TEA DI BI
ments is available to officiallyreog- M O NT E CA RLO BA LL
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Forms are available in Room
1011 SAB. V
0 * MARCH 20 9 P.M.-1 A.M.
Lutheran Student Center (National
Lutheran Council), Worship, 930 and t UNION BALLROOM
a.m.), Sun., March 21; Sunday eve-
ning program, 7 p.m., fellowship sup- f
per. Lutheran Student Center, 801 S.
Forest Ave. * * ,J Tickets: $3.00 per couple ($2.50 ISA members)
Newman Student Association, "Clean- Vat International Center Fishbowl or Door
up Day," March 20, 10 a.m., 331a rlio
Thompson. _-I o tf0-- O- <-- <- G- t -:l --y : y O<--7-y<

Oc

Tickets at the door

SOc

a

SEATS AT BOX OFFICE MON.

"

I

l

.

OR

I1 '

Shows at
1:00 - 3:40 - 6:25 - 9:10

THERE IS STILL TIME

.". .

i

to sign. up for
MICHIGAN UNION

Professional Theatre
Program
~ and
Creative Arts Festival
present
'M% V/IUL

AIRFLIGHT to EUROPE
Flight 1 ... May 6-June 6
Detroit--London-Amsterdam--Detroit$7A %

A BRILLIANT STUDY OF THE NEGRO STRUGGLE
FOR FREEDOM IN AMERICA.

I

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