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March 02, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN RAIL

fryl1w 40 In A NY th lks A Im

aPAsE TWO Ti1 t1 DD 1 V 1 LT IIAI. 1

TUESDIAY, 2 M&ACH1965

V

KINGSTON TRIO:

Cornell Probes Student

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Name House as Foundation Director

Song 'Plagiarists' Admit Guilt Marijuana Consumption

By CANDIDA EISENSTEIN
The Kingston Trio, who played
at Hill Aud. Saturday night, get
their music by "stealing it," as
they quipped several times during
an interview.
Fred Geiss, nicknamed "Arizona
Smith," Bob Dylan, Mason Wil-
liams, John Stewart, Tom Paxton
and the Weavers provide their ma-
terial, the trio said.
They appeared surprised at being
asked whether this "stealing"
caused animosity among the dif-
ferent performers.'Folk singers
as a group are "very clannish,"
they explained.
"Only those who are not work-
ing are vicious," the trio added.
The trio does not travel South
in civil rights protests as many of
the current singers do. "We feel
that we can do more by benefits
and raising money than by going
there for publicity," Nick Reynolds
of the trio explained.
The trio gives concerts for six
months of the year, mainly at
colleges. "The 'University has the
nicest auditorium of the many in
which we have worked." Nick said.
They rarely play at nightclubs
but return to the "Hungry i" for
"nostalgic reasons" from time to
time.
The trio performed two encores
here. Nick explained this was very
rare. "We usually don't play any-
thing, after 'When the Saints Go
Marching In,' but it was such fun
to sing here," he said.
The trio subscribes to the view-
point that the popularity of folk
music is a recent phenomenon.
"The youth have taken hold of it,
people associate themselves with
it," Nick said.
They have just finished a new
album, as yet untitled, which .will
appear in April. Currently they are
working under the Decca label to
"put some new blood' in an old
company."
Nick, who sings and plays conga
drums, was born in Coronado, but.
as the son of a Navy career offi-
cer, he traveled widely and picked
up new songs each times the
family moved. Each time his
father returned from periodic sea
duty, he taught his children the
songs of the lands he visited.

Collegiate Press Service
ITHACA, N.Y.-For the second
time in less than two years, an
investigation of the use of mari-
juana by Cornell University stu-
dents has been undertaken.
No arrests have been made yet,
but James A. Perkins. Cornell
president, said that "several" stu-
dents were using marijuana and
that the university viewed with
"utmost concern" its availability
and use by "even a few students."
Cornell began the investigation
wh'en they were notified that a
student at Connecticut College
for Women in New London had
allegedly obtained marijuana from
a Cornell campus source. The Con-
necticut student became ill and a
preliminary investigation by her
college traced the drug to Cor-
nell.
Looking for Offenders
In discussing the probe, Perkins'
said: "Cornell hopes the investiga-
tion will lead to the real offenders'
in this vicious business, the or-

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ganized network of producers and!
agents who prey upon young
people and persuade them to ex-
periment with habit-forming nar-'
cotics."
"Cornell intends to do all within
its power to remove the oppor-
tunity for life-long harm that
grows out of the availability of
narcotics here," he said.
In 1963, on the same day that
Perkins was inaugurated as presi-
dent, an earlier maijuana scandal'
swept the Cornell campus. That'
invest gation, however, resulted in
no convictions and cases against
two students were dropped because
of insufficient evidence.
13 Arrested
During the past two years, 13;
young people, including students
at Cornell and Ithaca College,
have been arrested in a continuing'

Robert J. House, research asso- 7:15 p.m.-The Sierra Cluo will Phyllis Wright (Second Ward),
ciate at the Bureau of Industrial present two films, the "Wilder- Prof. Joseph Kallenbach (Third
Relations in the business adminis- ness Alps of Stehekin and "The Ward), Jay Stielstra (Fourth
tration school, has been named Gooney Birds" in Rackham Am- Ward) and Robert Carr (Fifth
executive director of the McKin- phitheater. Ward).
zie Foundation for Management 8 p.m.-Erskine Caldwell, ;roted - -
Research, Inc., in New York. author, will speak on "Out of the
House joined the U-M staff in Caldwell Workshop" in the Liichi-
1963, after three years as assist- gan ballroom.
ant professor at Iowa State Uni- 8:30 p.m. - Joseph Knitzer,
versity. violznist and Arthur Losser,
M pianist, will give a recital in Rack-
Prof. Leland Stowe, Pulitzer- ham Lecture Hall.
Prize-winning veteran foreign cor- 8:30 P.m.-All Five Democratic
respondent, was honored by the Council candidates and Mayoralty
Assembly of Captive European Na- candidate Eunice Burns will speak
tions in New York City recently. at the Young Democrats Candi-
He was awarded the Assembly's dates Night, in Rm. 3C of the
Tenth Anniversary Commemora- Union. Those appearing will in-
tive Medal and scroll for his "ob- lude: H. C. Curry (First Ward),
jective writings and his book on. -.-
East Central Europe." The award
is for his articles in the Reader's
Digest and other magazines and Full Time & Evening Employment
for his book."nnirbyTlmf

1

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-Daiy-aWiebke voss
THE KINGSTON TRIO (from left to right) Bob, John, and
Nick-a "commercial folk" group-appeared here in concert
to a sellout audience last Saturday night. The songs they sing
come from a variety of sources-notably, other folk singers.

,I'VI 1 16Ciur+ hes Lyerror:
investigation of marijuana traffic The Story of Satellite Europe."
in the college community. * * *

Revgents Set New Faculty Appointments
Approvie Promotions, Further Cha'nges

The Regents approved the fol- been on the faculty of the Uni-'
lowing appointments, promotions versity of South Florida, Tampa.
and other changes in faculty. Botanist
Hiroshi Iquma as assistant pro-
APPOINTMENTS fessor in botany effective July 1
John H. D'Arms as assistant 1965. He has been on the faculty
professor of Latin effective' Sep- at University of Pennsylvania.
tember 1965. He is completing David W. Kramer as lecturer in
PhD requirements at Harvard botany, Flint College, effective
University where he also has Aug. 23, 1965. He now is complet-
served as a teaching fellow. . ing his PhD requirements at Rut-
Victor DeAraujo as" lecturer in gers University where he also is
English, Flint College, effective' an instructor.
Aug. 23, 1965. He has been acting Khalil H. Mancy as assistant
instructor,hUniversity of Wash- professor of environmental chem-
ington, where he is. completing rently he is a research fellow at
PhD requirements. , istry effective Aug. 1, 1965. Cur-
Heini Halberstam as 'visiting' Harvard University.
professor of mathematics effec- Joseph J. Martin as associate
tive September 1965. He is a pro- director of the Institute of Science
fessor of mathematics at the Un- and Technology, effective Jan. 4,
versity .of Nottingham, England. 1965. He continues as professor of
Robert W. Heywood asassoci'ate. chemical and metallurgical engi-
neering.'

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processor of history, Li"nt C o ege,
effective Aug. 23, 1965. He has

"The American public" is composedt
entirely of men of genius"
-GBS
well, at least those who attend''
THE DEVIL'S DISCIPLE
by GBS
**Presented by the EMU Players

for reservations:

HU 2-3453
Quirk Theatre $1.25

March 3-7

8:00 P.M.

Anthropologist
Mervyn J. Meggitt as professor
of anthropology effective Septem-
ber 1965. Currently he is on the
faculty of the University of Man-
chester, England, and served as
visiting professor here in the 1964,
winter term.
Mitchess S. Novitt as assistant
.professor of industrial relations
effective August 1965. He has been
a teaching fellow in the Graduate
School of Business Administration
here and is completing PhD re-
quirernents.t
Robert i.Peaty' as acting'direc-
tor, Institute of Public Adminis-
tration, Dec. 21, 1964 to July 31,
1965. He has been associate di-
rector of the institute. The ap-
poihtment is during the absence-t
on-leave of Prof. Ferrel Heady.
Bezalel Peleg as visiting assist-
ant professor of mathematics ef-t
fective for the fall term 1965. Het
is a' senior assistant at the Hebrew
University.
Director
T. David Prinsas director of
the University's Speech Improve-
ment Camp, Northport, Mich. He
has served as assistant director
since 1961, and also is an assistant
professor of speech. The camp
has been under the direction of
John N. Clancy, scheduled to re-
tire this June..
John B. Schroeder as lecturer in
political science, Flint College, ef-
fective Aug. 23, 1965. He now is
completing PhD requirements at
the University.
Richard B. Stuart as assistant
professor of social work effective
August 1965. He is on the faculty
at Rutgers University.
Samuel J. Taylor as visiting
professor of mathematics effective
September 1965. He is on the fac-
ulty of Westfield College, Univer-
sity of London.
University Scholarships - Rog-
er M. Jones of the English depart-
ment, Jan. 7 to June 30, to fill
the unexpired term of Prof. Rich-
ard J. Ross on sabbatical leave.
Executive Committee, University
Extension Service - Associate
Dial 662-6264
3RD BIG WEEK'
Shows at1 357:05&9:15
JAMES BOND IS
BACK IN ACTION!

Deans James H. Robertson of the
literary college and Charles F.
Lehmann of the education school,
Jan. 1, 1965, to Dec. 31, 1967, and
Assistant Dean Herbert W. Jones
of the architecture and design
college, Jan. 1, to Dec. 31, 1965.
PROMOTIONS
Hadley P. Schaeger, from assist-
ant professor of accounting to as-
sociate professor, Dearborn Cam-
pus, effective Feb. 15, 1965.
RESIGNATIONS
Kelly M. Berkley, M.D., assist-
ant professor of surgery, effective
Dec. 31, 1964. He has accepted a
position at the Hahnemann Medi-
cal College, Philadelphia.
Harold J. Blumenthal, associate
professor of microbiology, effective
May 23, 1965, to accept the chair-
manship of the microbiology de-
partment of the Stritch School of
Medicine, Loyola University, Chi-
cago.
RETIREMENTS
A memoir on the retirement of
Prof. A. D. Moore of the electrical
See APPROVE, Page 8
Center Offers
Paolitical Jobs
Qualified students may earn up
to, $80 a week this spring and
summer as staff members of po-
litical parties or interest groups.
The Michigan Center for Edu-
cation in Politics will offer ten
summer internships, from eight to
ten weeks each, to college juniors,
seniors and recent graduates.
Application blanks may be ob-
tained from Prof. Jack L. Walker
of the political science depart-
ment. The deadline is April 10.
COME LAUGH AND ENJOY
THIS GREAT CLASSIC BY
George Bernard Shaw
CANDIDA
A MASTERPIECE
OF HIGH COMEDY
ANN ARBOR CIVIC
THEATER
8 P.M., March 4, 5, 6
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
Box Office open 10 A.M.-5 P.M.
Mail orders to P.O. Box 1993
Thursday, $1.50
Friday & Saturday, $1.75

College spokesmen declined fur-
ther comment until the district
attorney reported findings from
his investigation.
Elsewhere, three men were con-
victed recently on charges of ped-
dling narcotics in the neighbor-
hood of Harvard Square in Cam-
bridge, Mass.
Judge Edward Pecce, who im-
posed suspended fines and jail
sentences on the three men, said:
"The situation is alarming . . . the
use of drugs among students is
depressing."
Harvard Students Too
Although none of the three men
was associated with Harvard Uni-
versity, the New York Times re-
ports that the university admin-
istration is known to be aware
that some students are customers
of drug peddlers.
Officials at Harvard have pri-
vately expressed moral and civic
concern about student use of mari-
juana, but they are understood to
believe that the use of the drug
is more a matter of youthful ex-
perimentation than of addiction.
Harvard students estimate that
from one-fifth to one-half of the
12,500 students studying at the
university have tried marijuana.
d

igned

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TUESDAY. MAR. 2
8:30 a.m.--Registration for the
Community College Counselor-
Student Conference will begin in
the Rackham Bldg.
4 p.m.-C. B. Anfinsen of the
National Institutes of Health, will
lecture on "Molecular Structure!
and the Function of Proteins" in
the third level amphitheater of
the Medical Science Bldg.
..4:15 p.m.-Louis Slobodkin, an
author and illustrator of children's
literature, will speak on "Creating
Children's Books" in the Multi-
purpose Rm. of the UGLI.
8 p.m.-Dore Ashton, art critic,
will lecture on "American Draw-
ing. in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-Raymond D. Gastil, of
the Hudson Institute, will lecture
on "Arms and Defense" in Rm.
1057, Mental Health Research In-
stitute.
WEDNESDAY. MAR. 3
4 p.m .-Merle Lawrence of tihe
Kresge Hearing Research Insti-
tute, will lecture on "The Paradox
of the Middle Ear Muscles," in
Rm. 2501 E. Medical Bldg.
7:15 p.m.-The Physical Thear-
apy Club will meet in the Con-
ference Rm. of the University
Hospital.

for student privacy

UflIVERSIJY TOWERS
" Now renting for Aug. '65
S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOREST AVE. PHONE: 761-2680

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THE ROMANOFFS
GERMAN-AMERICAN CUISINE
Welcomes Ann Arbor Students
BREAKFAST-LUNCH-DINNER
TODAY'S SPECIAL
FRIED CHICKEN
German Fried Potatoes
Cole Slow ....................... 95c
NEW YORK STRIP STEAK 8 oz.
Homemade Rolls and Butter
French Fries, Tossed Salad ........ $1.55
300 S. Thayer 665-4967
O PEN 7 to 7F
EF ECUNTAIM

21-35
If you are free from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. four evenings each week and
occasionally on Saturday. you cpn maintain your studies and still enjoy
o nrrf-time fob doing special interview work that will bring an average
weekly income of $64.
If you are neat appearing and a hard worker call Mr. Jones at 761-
1488 from 10 a.m. to 12 a.m. Monday-Friday. No other times.
We are also interested in full-time employment,

L

If

Could Corning
be the company
you're looking for?,
Why not
take 1% hour
and find out?
Corning has challenging careers available for
many types of Technical, Business and Liberal
Arts graduates. Check with your placement
office for specific opportunities in your field.
You still have
time to register
for your interview.
We'll be on campus March 4. See you then?
An equal opportunity employer

I

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T - -Wwm - m '
IN CONCERT

DIAL 8-64

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akc- ",

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at T,3,5, 7, 9P.M.

FL 1N G.S

The film makers
who brought you
A TASTE OF HONEY and
TOM JONES now take
pride in presenting...

Every
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SATURDAYMARCH13mr1965kesd

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mark registered.
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