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February 11, 1965 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. 11 FEBRIIAq- tI' q

i i.{ a.V L4 /7.L7t11 f Al ' Jr JL31L %_ tIV X 100a7

ARTS and LETTERS By Karen Margolis
'U' Piano Tuner Reminisces

IQC Leader Favors AHC
Committee, Merger Plans

END WATERMAN MAZE:
Woolley Plans Early Registration

"I don't play the piano and I
don't have perfect pitch," claims
B. J. Hildinger, who has been
tuning and repairing pianos for
the University Musical Society for
twenty years.
Some of his more notable clients
have been Arthur Rubinstein, Ru-
dolph Serkin, Van Cliburn, Myra
Hess and Vladimir Horowitz.
"I don't think they're tempera-
mental. They're just like any-
body else," he says of the artists.
"They are really nice people to
tune pianos for."
He finds the pianists particular
about the tone and action of a
piano and the uniform hardness
of hammers (which gives all notes
the same volume), but says no one
has ever complained about his
tuning.

Hildinger has attended every
Musical Society concert that con-
tains a piano; he is usually "on
call" backstage.
The tuner attended the Univtr-
sity School of Music for three
years and played the violin in
the University Symphony Orches-
tra and at Ann Arbor theatres.
World War I interrupted his edu-
cation. He learned to tune pianos
in the Marines, where he played
trombone in the band as well as
violin in the orchestra.
Hildinger tuned pianos for the
School of Music for 14 years while
it had its practice headquarters
on Maynard Street. He stopped
in 1957 because he had to keep
odd hours. "The building was too
busy and noisy to do tuning dur-

ing the day," he explains.
The veteran tuner claims that
perfect pitch is not a requisite
for anyone in his profession. "You
don't tune by pitch; you tune by
beats or vibrations," he contends.
He says a piano can be tuned
more perfectly than any other in-
strument because of these vibra-
tions.
He is a member of the Piano
Technician's Guild and charges'
according to its recommended,

Democrats Refuse To Meet,
In Closed Council Sessions
Democrats on the Ann Arbor crimination.
City Council recently declared In council meetings held before
they would meet in no more ses- Monday night, the "Republicans;
sions closed to the public, had managed to create the im-
pression that they had not yet.
They said that they had given worked out a response to the Hu-I
the idea of closed meetings a fair man Relations Commission's rec-
test, but "what was supposed to ommendation that coverage of our
have been a frank, open discus- present fair housing law be greatly
sion was used by a few Republi- extended.. . Then in the ensuing
cans as an occasion to mouse- formal meeting, they introduced1
trap the Democratic minority on their surprise proposal."
council." The meeting broke up with ac-
The statement was provoked by cusations from both Democrats
a split over the proposed "Hulcher and Republicans that the sessiont
amendment" to the fair housing was only being used for politicalt
ordinance. The amendment would advantage. The Democratic state-.
include Article 1, Section 2 of the ment concluded: 'Our earlier mis-I
state constitution in the legisla- givings about closed meetings were
tion. This article affirms that confirmed by the unhappy eventsf
state policy does not allow dis- of Monday night."F

By LESLEY FINKELMAN
John Eadie, '65, President of
Inter-Quadrangle Council, com-
mented favorably yesterday on the
proposed Assembly House Coun-
cil-IQC merger and the study
committee formed by AHC last
Monday.
Assembly voted unanimously for
the study committee proposed by
new president Georgia Berland,
'67. The committee's purpose is to
review the structures of both AHC
and IQC with respect to the way
their functions and purposes will
affect a merger.
The committee will consist of
the presidents of AHC and IQC,
two coed dorm presidents, two
house presidents (one male, one
female), an AHC representative,
and an IQC representative.
To Be Studied
Items to be considered and re-
ported in the study are:
-The most equitable means of
representation by population on
the merged council;
-The possibility of a merger
involving only the executive boards
of the two organizations, rather
than the councils as a whole:
-The creation of an associate
member program for IQC similar
to that of AHC in which an in-
dependent individual has a vote
in his former house;
-The relationship of AHC and
IQC to the new Off-Campus
Housing B o a r d. representing
apartment men and women; and
-The feasibility of the incor-
poration of a Judicial branch into
the merged organization.
Begin Soon
"I'd like to see this committee
formed and carry out its functions
as soon as possible so that we
can get down to writing the con-
stitution for the merged body,"
Eadie said.
"A merger of only the executive

boards would be insufficient and
unnecessary. What is important in
AHC is important to IQC, andI
the two organizations could be!
better merged if a coed dorm was
not sending one representative to
a male side and one to a female
side; communications would be
easier if this proposed body were
totally merged," Eadie said.
An associate member program
might be a helpful idea, for in
this way independent men and
women have a voice to express
their problems which relate to
those in a dorm, he added.
,I really think that executive
officers and voters of IQC and
AHC ought to live in residence
halls, and we shouldn't try to
represent off-campus people,"
Eadie said.
"IQC has been asking for a
merger for over a year, and I'm
glad to see that it may soon be
a reality. Both AHC and IQC
wou'd benefit from the merger for
at least these three reasons:
-There would be twice the base
from which to get people to carry
out functions. Staffing would be
simpler;
-Men and women working to-
gether makes more interest arid
spirit. a

By LAUREN SHEPARD
A new experimental registration
program which will incorporate
the preliminary and final regis-
tration processes will be put into
effect this spring, according to!
Douglas Wooley, director of regis-
tration.
"Students, faculty and staff

members have indicated a need to demic departments will not pro-
eliminate the mass registration vide faculty for the classification
maze at Waterman Gymnasium. of these students.
With the advent of the third term,
an excellent opportunity is afford- The continuing enrollment de-
ed to eliminate it with an early posit will be in effect for this term
registration program." as it is in the fall and winter'
A student enrollment of 6,000 terms. Students who register and
is expected for the spring-sum- then do not return to classes will
mer term. This will include a forfeit their $50 enrollment de-
cross section of the entire student posit.
body which now registers at Wa-
terman Gymnasium.
Allstudents, including gradu-
ates currently enrolled at the
University who are planning to
attend the third term starting
May 5, will be a part of this ex- -AE inter
perimental registration program. -o e e
p r for k
The period set aside for early eke
registration is Feb. 22 to April 16.
During this time, students will H ill Aud. Tomor
receive registration materials at
the counseling office, meet with For Inform
their counselors to have their
course elections approved, and 764-
then proceed to the registration
area at 1040 Natural ResoureCc

third term May 5.
New and readmitted students
who are signing up for the third
term are the only ones able to go
through the maze at Waterman.
Their registration, scheduled for
May 3-4, will be staffed by a very
few people. They will be assigned
classes by staff employed by the
IRegistrar'. Office sincp the c.

The spring-summer term is
made up of three separate terms.
The full spring-summer 16 week
term has been assigned the num-
ber III, the spring-half term
I,, -A, and the summer-half term
III-B.
Students may elect courses in
all three parts of the term, Wooley
said,
However, if they elect :courses
in the summer-half (III-B) only,
they cannot register early. They
will have to register at the gym
June 24-25.
"From an evaluation and study
of this experiment, we hope in the
near future to register students
early for the fall and winter
terms, also," Wooley commented.
!ntly N eeWde~d
nd Skit Night
row at 8:00 P.M.
nation Call:
2906

If

,,A

1

B. J. HILDINGER

u~ritA 1
-A common male and female j Building to be registered.
voice has more effect on the ad- At this point, the student will
ministration because they are be completely registered and will
more apt to act when a situation only need to receive his schedule
concerns both sexes. of classes before beginning the
Outline Aid Project for
TImi-over Ished Families

a unique event in motion picture history
two complete films on the same subject

i

prices: 15 dollars to tune any;
piano, and extra for repair work.
Hildinger likes good popular and
classical music and "I don't mind
the Beatles." He has onie son whoI
is a piano tuner and one who
writes music for movies, television
and radio. A third son strayed
from family tradition and became
a civil engineer.

...HIS
Here is my swor, ... everything
- even those things I would never
tell my wife. I hold nothing back.
Surely you will agree that I am right,..

HERS...
' Here is my slory ...everything
even those things I would never
tell my husband. I hold nothing back.
Surely you will agree that 1 am right...

ACROSS CAMPUS:
Kolars Participates in Florida 'Non-Western' Meeting

By JOSUA BARLEV
The pressing needs which neces-
sitate a prompt completion of De-t
troit's poverty program were out-
lined in a recent speech to the1
University chapter of the Ameri-
can Society for Public Administra-
tion by John Musial, program
director for the project.I
Detroit presently has more thanj
80 000 families earning less thane
$3000 a year. Only about 21,000t
are receiving some sort of publice
assistance and most of the aid isY
not channeled into education
where it is needed, Musial con-1
tended.a
He explained that "it is general-

Prof. John F. Kolars of the
geography department recently
participated in the Non-Western
Affairs Institute, in St. Peters-
burg, Fla. The institute is a proj-
ect of the Association of Mid-
Florida Colleges. Each of the five
associated colleges invites a "Resi-
dent Expert" as its contribution
to the discussion of the general
topic, "The United States and the
Middle East."
A faculty member and a student
recently represented the Univer-
sity on the program of the an-
nual conference of the American
Management Association.
Robert L. Kahn, program direc-
tor of the Survey Research Center
and professor of psychology, par-
ticipated in the session, "Putting
the Concepts of the Behavioral
Sciences into Practical Operation."
Roger B. Upson, Grad, took
part in a quiz titled "Tomorrow's
Managers Challenge Today's Busi-
ness Leaders."
Donald R. G. Cowan, professor
of marketing in the business ad-
ministration school, is in Taiwan
as one of a five-man team of U S.
experts. At the request of the
government of China (Taiwan) the
team is studying energy resources
and requirements.
A paperback book published by
the University Press in 1964 has
been cited for excellence by the
American Institute of Graphic
Arts.
The Institute of Continuing Le-
gal Education (ICLE) of the Uni-
versity Law School, Wayne State
University Law School and the
State Bar of Michigan will spon-
sor a symposium of more than
2000 lawyers Feb. 26-27. The 16th
annual Advocacy Institute will deal
with the theme of "Personal In-
Jury .Damages."
Eighteen of the nation's best
known trial lawyers and legal au-
thorities will take part in the two-
day event at Hill Aud. The pro-
gram will include lectures, trial
demonstrations and evaluations.
HIGHLIGHTS
from
PAGEANT
MAGAZINE
NATIONALISM:
BLESSING OR CURSE
The eminent historian, Prof. Henry
Steele Commager, discusses its effects
on the emerging nations
BOBBY DYLAN:
SINGING SPOKESMAN
A profile of America's youthful
poet-laureate of folk-singing
WHY D0 YOU WORK? I

"Catullus, The Complete Poetry,"
translated by Prof. Frank O. Cop-
ley of the classical languages de-
partment was selected for in-
clusion in the new catalog, "1964
Paperbacks U.S.A.," which marks
the institute's 50th anniversary
year. "Catullus" was also one of
30 U.S. paperbacks cited as a
"complete book," for excellence
both in cover design and text.
. . * .*
THURSDAY, FEB. 11
1 p.m.-Prof. Lee E. Danielson
of the business and administra-
tion school will speak on "Manag-
ing the Departmental Office" in
the Union.
2:30 and 8:30 p.m. - The Pro-
fessional Theatre Program will
present "An Evening's Frost" in
the Mendelssohn Theatre.
3:30 p.m.-Prof. A. Benjamin
Handler of the Architecture
School will lecture on "The Place
of the Social Sciences in. Archi-
tecture" in the Architecture Aud.
4 p.m.-Laurence Bogorad will
present a lecture on "Monecular
Organization and Biological Func-
tion-Organization of Plastids" in
the third level amphitheater of the
Medical Science Bldg.
4- p.m.-James M. Sprague, di-
rector- of Medicinal Chemistry of
Merck, Sharp and Dohne Research
Laboratories, will give a talk on
"Approaches to Drug Develop-
ment" in 1200 Chemistry Bldg.
4 p.m.-Dr. James M. Sprague,
director of medicinal chemistry in
Merck Sharp and Dohme Research
Laboratories will discuss "Ap-

proaches to Drug Development" 4 p.m.-Dr. James M. Sprague,
in Rm. 1200 Chemistry-Pharmacy director of medicinal chemistry in
Bldg. Merck Sharp and Dohme Research
7 p.m. - Daniel Howland of Laboratories will discuss "New
Ohio University will speak on Diuretics in the Phenoxyacetic
"The Measurement of Patient Acid Series" in Rm. 1200 Chemis-
Care: A Conceptual Framework', try-Pharmacy Bldg.
in Rm. 69 of the business and ad- 4:10 p.m.-Prof. Oleg Grabar of

ministration school- the history of art department and '.Uoct thatdto earn an
7'and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will the Kelsey Museum of Archaeol- adequate income in this society,v
present "Ivan the Terrible," Part ogy will lecture on "The Univer- education is necessary. One of thet
I in the Architecture Aud. I sity's Excavations in Syria-1964" problems involved is to convince
7:30 p.m. - Wendell Hulcher, in Aud. B. minority groups of this."
the Republican candidate for 4:15 p.m. - Kenneth Benne of Detroit's Youthi
mayor of Ann Arbor, will address the Human Relations Center in The Total Action against Pov-
the Young Republican Club on Boston will lecture in Aud. C. erty program is going to be direct-
"University - City Relations" in 5:10 p.m.-A Community Mass ed mainly at the youth of the city.a
Rm. 3B of the Union. All students, and Supper will be held at St. TAP will include a work-training,X
faculty and staff may attend. Mary's Student Chapel, work-study and "job corps" pro-
d p.m.-Jan Garrett, the former 7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will gram for males and females.be-r
editor of the "Young Socialist." present "Ivan the Terrible," Part tween the ages of 16 and 21.
will lecture on "Inside the Cuban I, in the Architecture Aud. Musial pointed out the impor-r
Revolution" in room 3511 of thed 7:30 p.m.--A Fireside Chat will tance of beginning with younger{
SAB. be held at St. Mary's Student I groups to solve the overall prob-f
8 p.m. - The Rev. James E. Chapel. Father Thomas G. Litka lem; he referred to the Civilp
Wadsworth, president of the De- will discuss "A Community of Rights struggle as an example. At
troit chapter of the NAACP, will Love." first, he said, the movement wase
speak on "The Future of the Var- I 8 p.m.-John Snow, nationally led primarily by white liberals-
ious Civil Rights Organizations" known folk dance teacher, will because 80 per cent of adult Ne-
in the third. floor conference lead a workshop of Balkan folk groes were from the South and
room of the Union. dances in Barbour Gym, lacked the education and drive
8:30 p.m. - The music school 8:00 p.m.-The Winter Weekend
will present a Baroque Trio Re- Skit Night will begin at Hill Aud.
cital, featuring Professors Keith Six 20-minute skits will be pre- INSTANT SI LENCE
Bryan, Florian Mueller, John 4 sented.
Flower and Clyde Thompson of 8:30 p.m.-Doctoral students in For information write:
the music school in Rackham Aud. piano performance will give a re- Academic Aids, Box 969
FRIDAY, FEB. 12 cital of "The Prokofiev Piano Berkeley, California
3:30-5:30 p.m.-Winter Week- the music scthe Recital Hal of 947
end will begin with dance in thetc
Michigan Union Ballroom. Prizes j
will be awarded to individual
couples in a dance contest,
F~kAAT *

needed to effectively lead the
struggle. Lately though, young Ne-
groes have become the leaders and
their intelligence and spirit has
gained tremendous progress in the
last few years. The same wouldE
apply to a program of the TAP
caliber.
If young people were trained to
lead useful lives and have skilled
jobs, a change would permeate the
entire structure of the society so
that over time it would lose the
elements that originally caused
he poverty, according to Musial.
He said that quite a few prob-
lems have to be faced by Detroit
and similar cities:
-Trying to convince people to
take advantage of the facilities,
which in the past have been badly
unused;
-Trying to place the retrained
and semiskilled in a labor market
narrowed, in the short run, by
automation: and
-Eliminating the "institution-
alized prejudice" that impedes
progress and prospe6ity.
"The advantages of the Eco-
nomic Opportunity Act of 1964,"
Musial concluded, "are enough to
make such a program worthwhile.
One of the main emphases, is to
provide people with the tools to
help themselves, to overcome en-
vironmental deficiencies such as
education and training."
WALT DISNEY'S
ACH I EVEM ENT!:

AMERICAN PREMIERE TODAY
MY NIGHTS MY DAYS
WITH FRANCOISE WITH JEAN-MARC

NOW
Dial 8-6416

m

One Show
Tonight
at 7:15

' I

662-6264

* ENDING TODAY "
"TWO ON A GUILLOTINE"
Shown at 1-3-5-7 & 9

STARTS FRIDAY

JAMES BOND IS SACK IN ACTION!

I
4

EVERYTHING HE TOUCHES TURNS TO EXCITEMENT!

II

I

4

a

International Contemporary Music
ONCE Festival 1965
1 1 Feb.-Spectacular Theatre Music
12 Feb.-Orchestra
13 Feb.-Electronic Music & Cybersonics
14 Feb.-Lukas Foss Ensemble

I

I I.* "VL UJ

SEAN CONNERY AS AGENT o
i IAN FLEMING'S
"GOLDFINGER"
TECHNICOLOR
G*ERT FROBE as GOLDFINGER HONOR BLACKMAN
Shown at 1-3-5-7:05 & 9:15-Mat. $1.00; Eves. & Sun. $1.25

JULIE " ! J DICK
ANDREWS -VAN DYKE
Shows at 1:00-3:40-6:30-9:05
Mat. $1.25-Eves. & Sun. $1.50
Children all times 75c

i

8:30 P.M.

VFW Hall

314 E. Liberty

rsYrsr=r* mininniinmni. miinmwmmmmmm unnmmmmmmmm *minmminin d
1 I
I 1
s I
PART I
I /
written and directed by Sergei Eisenstein U
musical score by Sergei Prokofiev
photography by Eduard Tisse
I
The first of this two-part epic-biography in film :
focuses on Ivan IV, one of the most colorful figures
I in Russian history. I
I 1
Eisenstein has asserted that nothing has been con-
cealed, nothing smoothed over in his dynamic his- y
I torical chronicle of the formidable tsar.
Lauded as a "fascinating screen tapestry" the film
' is rich in images, sounds and heroic characteriza-
I tions. I
I I
I I

i
r

MEET THE "NEW COLONY SIX"
NEW CHICAGO LAND BAND-WITH THEIR 1ST RECORD ALBUM
COMING OUT IN APRIL ON THE MERCURY LABEL.

I

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f I

FIFNW M 7 F fl9 ADmticPotri

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