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February 09, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-02-09

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A

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDbAY.0 9 FBRTTAR"V 1Ir ...StSbt*Q"

c v jL;O O" % X, 0 r jr,""V IXL I I V IDO

li

Horvat Details Nation 's Growth

PARALLEL PRIVILEGES FOR DORMS:

By MARK KILLINGSWORTH
Some element of democratic
planning in a capitalist system is
e isential to the maximization of
producer and consumer welfare,
Branko Horvatodirector of the
research division of Yugoslavias;
planning agency said Thursday
night at an economics society1
lecture.
Across
Canmpus,
TUESDAY, FEB. 9
4 p.m. - Albert E. Lehningerf
will speak on "Molecular Organi-
zation and Biological' Function -

Such planning will also remedy
the "social vacuum" of capitalism,.]
Horvat continued. a
The Great Depression showed;
that supply and demand operated)
in a "vacuum" in capitalism, he1
said. Yugoslavia evolved a newl
system of planning concerned withk
social ends which is "neither capi-'
talistic, nor centrally planned,
like Russia's, nor mixed, like'
Sweden's. United Nations econ-
omists, in fact, don't know how
to classify it."
He noted that the Yugoslav
government accounts for fifteen
per cent of the country's gross na-
tional product and controls about
thirty per cent of investment. The
figures for the United States gov
erment are sixteen per cent and
33 per cent, respectively, he e-
Sclared.

Mitochondrial S t r u c t u'r e and High Growth Rate
Function" in the third level am- "But whatever its classification,
phitheater of the Medical Science the Yugoslav economy has achiev-j
Bldg. ed one of the highest growth rates
8 p.m. - William T. Patrick, in the world-10 per cent annual-
assistant general attorney for ly." he continued.
Michigan Bell Telephone, will dis- The most unusual aspect of the1
cuss "The Negro and Politics" in Yugoslav economy, the PhD. grad-
Rm. 3RS in the inon. uate of the London School of1
8 p.m.-J. C. Catford, director Economics maintained, "is its'
of the English language Institute, system of autonomous enterprises
will speak on "Palaeophony: Re- -the workers' councils."
construction of Pronunciation" in Under this system, introduced
Rackham Amphitheatre. after what Horvat called "exces-
8:30 p.m. - The music school 1 sive centralization that was keep-1
will present a faculty recital, fea- ing our growth too low," a plant's1
turing Professors Jerome Jelinek workers elect a governing council.
and Marilyn Mason-, of the music With the aid of managerial
school in Rackham Aud. specialists it hires, the council
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10 determines output, prices, invest-
4 p.m.-J. David Robertson will ment, wages and even employ-
speak on "Molecular Organiza- ment for the plant..
tion and Biological Function-The "It is legally impossible for any-
Organization of Cellular Mem- one to interfere in this process.
branes" in the third level amphi- Government agencies certainly
theater of the Medical Science have the "power of suggestion,"
Bldg. but if a council feels it has been
7:30 p.m. - Brice Carnahan of abused, it can go into the courts.
the engineering coHege will give This happens, and frequently the"
a Ford Computer Lecture in Nat- council wins its case," he said.
Ural Science Aud. Cucl motn
8:30 p.m. - The Professional Councils Important d
This arrangement. Horvat de-
Theatre Program will present "An ared, is "the most important
Evening's Frost" in the Mendels- siGledgrowthefacti or eca-
sohn Theatre.sgle growth factor in our econ-
8:30 p.m. -Muriel Williamson omy, I feel, though some of myl
will lecture on "Burmese Classical colleagues would disagree."
Music" in Aud A He noted that productivity hadt
8:30uc i A The ho increased two and one-half times
will present a French Horn recital after the worker's councils werej

Answering a question from Prof.
Daniel R. Fusfeld of the economics
department concerning the reason
for the interest charges, he de-
dared, "Marx talked about zapi-
talism and revolution, and only a
little about socialism. We've gone
through the first two. Now we
concern ourselves with socialism "
He said that United States aid
and establishment of a "most-
favored-nation" trade clause had
helped Yugoslavia considerably in
economic and political terms.
We previously had almost two-
thirds of our trade with the Soviet
bioc."
Uppier-Level,
(Continued from Page 1)
would be weighed in favor of in-
reasing undergraduate enrollment
because the pressure to grow is!
greatest in this area. However,
the literary college committee
report specifically stipulates that
future expansion must focuson
the junior, senior and graduate
levels.
Focus on Graduates
Haber and Associate Dean Wil-
liam Hay of the literary college
pointed out that adequate facili-
ties for freshman-sophomore edu-
cation will be increasingly avail-
able with the expansion of the
smaller state institutions and the
growth of junior and community
colleges.
"While the University, as it
should, will always remain a large
undergraduate institution," Haber
commented, "there is much to be
said for giving a special focus to
upper class and graduate educa-
tion. In these areas, the Univer-
sity has unique facilities and
staff."
"Furthermore he added, "it
must be ensured that the fac-
ulty at the new institutions is
such thaththey will beuoffering
high-quality programs. Here, the
literary college can play a spe-

.t
Junior Women Get Apartment Pers
(Continued from Page 11 Ann Arbor apartment market to out of the residences
and the residence hail system, out absorb the additional students. However, with parental permis-
of which students will be checking. According to Cutler, the OSA has sion as a stipulation, Cutler esti-
reasonable assurance from Ann mates this number will drop to be-
The Off-Campus Housing Bu- Arbor realtors that they can man- low one-half of the junior women
reau will compile a list of approv- age the increased apartment de- -an approximate 400 women.
ed housing to be made available mandCte fuhrrmakd ht
to the students. However, anyma . Cutler further remarked that
tod ten stues HeUver ay The Women's Conference Com- he thinks the University has the
ty rental agreement can be con- mittee, which worked with Cut- rent base in hand. They have re-
sidead endorsed. According to ler and the OSA via a series of ceived oral commitments from ma-
Cutler, about two-thirds of Ann recommendations on women's reg- jor builders preserving the present
Arbor apartments use the Univer- ulations, recently polled the pros- rent range.
sity rental agreements. pective juniors in residence halls The possibility of changing the
on their intentions for the fall.
One issue involved in the pres- About two-thirds of the women mont on tu eo Cuer
ent decision was the ability of the declared their intention to move motheis issus rtly zero, Cutler
nancial agreements underlying
Graduate Study E phaszed the development of these housing
I~rrduae Stdy mphaize units. A house operator is requir-
ed by the bonding agency to guar-
antee a certain income level per,
dividual research in a specialized with additional reading material year from that unit.
field. or recorded or televised lectures, Long Leases
This plan, of course, will have and With an eight month lease rents
no effect for some time. The' -Eliminating the general c- ;would have to be higher to meet
immediate "crisis." the report re- quirement that credits !)riven for th!eurmns ftefnne
quests that admissions to the lit- courses correspond to the number m
agency. Cutler said that Ann Ar-
erary college be held at the 1965 of hours spent in class oer week, ageny.Ct estimated that an
rate, at least until 1968. This with expanded counseling hours borht- nth leasewoudraise t
corresponds to a proposal made replacing many class periods, rent range from 10 to 25 per
by Prof. William LeVeque of the Immediate Study cent.
mathematics department at a In addition to suggestions on While junior apartment permis-
meeting of the faculty last Dec. instruction, the report proposes sion will free spaces in the nowj
7. that an immediate study be un- crowded residence halls, Cutler
The report emphasizes that dertaken to find ways to allev- does not expect it to alleviate
even if the planned admissions late problems caused by the u1- dhescrotdngpems. v
figure for 1965 is not increased creasingly complex structure of the crowding problems.
the colege.In regard to an extension of
in subsequent years, the literary e coege. liberalization to sophomore wom-
college will have expanded from The report lists reorganization en, Cutler said that the OSA will
its current enrollment of 9300 to of the college along divisional remain closed in this area for a
11.800 in 1968. lines as a possibility, pointing I
Other Reasons out that, with 29 departments and while to gather the needed ex-
almost 1000 faculty members, com- perience from the present change.
porthfor masinaiin a conetretmunications between the rank-
port for maintaining a constant and-file faculty and the adminis- :
'growth rate include: trative staff often breaks down. D eath Claim s
-The possibility that the prps- Moreover, to free faculty mem-
ent rate of growth may be suffi- bers from time-consuming admin- ' JI lb
cient to reach the University's istrative chores and simultaneous-
share of the total state enrollm!nt ly provide administrators more fa-
by 1975; miliar with management tech- Two members of the University
-The difficulty of rapidly ob- niques, the document suggests community died in accidents this
taining new faculty members of that the business operation of the weekend.

____________- -I
In Coiieiorat oz Of Its
75th Anniversar)y. The Le Mme
will .sptonsor a
Spring Fashion
Show
Leir//dry 18 If onen's Lea gie

l
-...

THE FINAL FIFTH
Saturday, February 13th
"CUPID'S COTILLION" 8 P.M.
Dancing to New Colony Six
Game Booth Midway at the IM Building
and
"Night at Vahalla"
9 P.M.
j Fashion Show
Sleigh Ride-Ice Skating
50c Skate Rental
WINES FIELD
TICKETS:
Fishbowl-
Tues.-Fri.
Diag-
Tues.
9 a.m.-4 p.m.
$1 before Saturday
$1.25 at the Door
DON'T MYTH IT!
- - ~- .~, -

.4
f
1

',

high quality in numbers that college might best be taken over
would be necessitated by more by 'non-academic personnel. Also,j
rapid growth, and this could eliminate the need to
_Thc rhr tha caidri m intannm redira t nha whn

i

cialized and vitally important role
in an overaP* plan for state edu-
cation by instituting a professional
;>rogyram to train teachers for these

in Hill Aud.
3rd Week
. .. . ,
WALT DISNEY
ACH IEVEM EN

introduced while the growth rate 'll-uit
of the country more than doubled. schools.
The Yugoslavian rate is now grow- Specialization
ing at about 10 per cent yearly. "This program," Haber explain-
The state banking system also ed, "would most likely be an in-
plays an important role in the tensified MA program in the-"sub-
economy, Horvat said. Though it ject matter of the student's spe-
charges interest for loans and cialty, supplemented by some
*.,. sells them in the market place- training in teaching methods. It
'a capitalist activity which Marx would have little resemblance to
J bitterly attacked"-Horvat declar- the traditional MA program in
* ed that this was "vital for ration- education designed for secondary-
. al resourse allocation," adding school teachers."
* that the state bank was not profit- He added that, since communi-
T! oriented, serving more like a na- ty and junior colleges are not
tional bank such as the Federal generally research centers, it is not
Reserve System to help the gov- necessary for their teachers to
ernment guide the economy ac- have PhD's, which, essentially, are
cording to its plan. awarded for proficiency in in-
DALYOFICA B

JULIE ' DICK
ANDREWS -VAN DYKE
EHNICOOV
Shows at
1:00-3:30-6:25-9:10
Prices This Show Only
Eves &Sunday $1.50
*Week Day Motinees $1 .25
DIAL 662-6264
Shows at 1 -3-5-7 & 9

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3654 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Per-
sonnel Techniques Seminar N James
Healey, president, Management and
3usiness Services, Columbus, Ohio, "Mo-
tivational Concepts, Tools and Tech-

I niques": Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Biological Sciences and I.S.T. Lecture
-Albert L. Lehninger, "Molecular Or-
ganization and Biological Function-
Mitochondrial Structure and Function":
Third Level Ampitheatre, Medical Sci-
ence Bidg., 4 p.m.
'Dept. of Linguistics Lecture-J. C.
Catford, director, English Langue In-
stitute, "Palaeophony: Reconstruction
of Pronunciation": Rackham Amphi-
theatre, 8 p.m.
School of Music Faculty Recital-Jer-
ome Jelinek, cello; Marilyn Mason,
aarpsichord: Rackham Lecture Hall, 8:30
p.m.
Doctoral Examination for Martin Ed-
ward Dulgarian, Geography; thesis:
"Ankara as a Planned National Capi-
tal," Tues., Feb. 9, 210 Angell HMall,
r Continued on Page 81

-n hencance Ma at zatew ie uuau
planning will be a reality by 1968, have be
and that future expansion plans dispensa
can thus be made in accordance Howev
with the college's "special role in that th
meeting the state's needs.' main th
Furthermore, the report aliti- sion-mak
cipates little help from ,he tri- teis.
mester before 1968. It poin-s out -
that full implementation of te -- -
year-round program will require
about 238 additional full-time fac-
ulty with corresponding increases
in classroom, office, and research
facilities-.-an impossible goal for
the next two or three years.
Weak Summer Term
While recognizing the poten-
tial of the trimester in long-
range growth plans, it notes a
prediction by Dean Stephen 'purr
of the graduate school that en-
roilment in the summer term will
never exceed two-thirds that of
the fall term and suggests that
alternative systems, such as the
quarter system, may have to be
studied by the faculty.
Although according to the re-
port the residential college may
be able to absorb enrollment in-
creases in the literary college for
a four-year period, this new unit
will not be open before 1967.
The document went on to point
out that, since 36 per cent of the
credit hours taught by literary coi-
lege faculty are devoted to in-
struction of students in other
schools at the University, con-
siderable expansion on the part of
these units could create serious
problems for the literary college.
While conceding that the col-
lege has an obligation to do such
"service teaching," especially on
the graduate level, the report
states that the literary college's
capacity to provide this service
should be a primary consideration
in the expansion of other Univer-
ity divisions.
Internal Changes
The committee document goes
on to give considerable attention
to changes within the college it-
self that might facilitate Pxpan-j
sion, improve thehquality of :n-
struction, or both. The i epoirt
suggests the following possibili-
ties for further discussion:
-Eliminating, as far as possi- j
ble, large lecture classes above the
sophomore level: --
-Gradually raising admissions
standards, in view of the increas- -
ing number of highly qualified ap-
plicants expected in the future
andethe lower percentage of the
student body that will be com-
posed of undergraduates:
-Replacing the lecture system

nmeuo e e acners wn I
come administratively in-
ble.
'er, the report empha3lzes
t the faculty must re-
e guiding force in deci-I
king on educational mat-!

David A. Brady, 25, a graduate
student in the medical school, was
found dead Sunday in a small
creek near his home six miles
southwest of here.
Mrs. Virginia H. William, 48, co-
ordinator of the University's
School of Public Health Program
died Sunday night from injuries
received in a car accident Jan-
uary 29.

L

PREMIERE WEDNESDAY

I

'4
1
r

Ends Wednesday Dial
Shows atH8-641 6
7 & 9 P.M
"HOLDS THE VIE E fRAHLS
AND LEAVES HIM LIMP! Bosey Crowther
N.Y. Times
"See just how exciting and compelling a motion
picture can be."-Hugh Holland, Mich. Daily
KIM STANLEY and
RICHARD ATTEN BOROUGH

A Dramatic Portml
F of the Poet
*MOD E RN DA NCINGbyoadHa
with A DISTINGUISHED CAST
Frug Jerk Monkey FEB.10-14.MENDELSSOHN THEATRE.ANN ARBOR
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ESTEATL10a.m. - 5p.m.
20% DISCOUNT-GROUPS OF 20 OR MORE
ad aiid Use laily (:IUsitit'(-I S Read The Daily Classifieds
-I -

"THE PERFECT
PSYCHOLOGICAL
SUSPENSE THRILLER
. A FLAWLESS
FILM!"
--N.Y. Herald Tribune

SEANICE
010 A WET
A&FTERNOGON

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