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January 23, 1965 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-01-23

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PAGE T VC'O

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, 23 JANUARY 1965

IAG q O HEIC IG N D IL1STURAY 21JAUAY 91

.L "

ECONOMIST'S VIEW:
Benoit Examines Arms Race

Across Campus

ANSWERS CRITICS:
Dorr Explains Part-Time Fee Structure

By MICHAEL BADAMO
Ending the arms race would not
involve a total disarmament of the
two major world powers but only
a freezing of existing war stock-
piles, Prof. Emile Benoit of Co-
lumbia University said yesterday.
Benoit, who is an economic con-
sultant for various government
and private organizations and
author of numerous books includ-
ing "Europe at Six and Seven,"
spoke in a journalism department
lecture. He described the avenues
open to the governments of the
United States and the Soviet Un-
ion in implementing an end to the
arms race.
Four-Point Program
A four-point program designed
to fix the U.S.'s deterrent capacity
is now under consideration by the
Defense Department. This plan
consists of:
-Freezing of all existing weap-
ons at their present levels;
--Complete stoppage of- all nu-
clear fuel production, thus pre-
venting any more nuclear weapons
from being produced;
--Cessation of all research into
new weapons systems either of-
fensive or defensive, including
such programs as increased em-
phasis on, Civil Defense;
--Placement of a fixed ceiling
on defense spending.
Partially
Many of these programs, Benoit
said, have already been at least
partially put into effect. The U.S.
and Russia over the past few years
have been operating under a tacit
agreement to halt increased
spending and the continued rise
in war stockpiles.
Benoit advocated a proposed
plan calling for the mutual de-
struction of bombers on a one-to-
one basis. This plan has not been

Prof. Robert Iglehart, chairman son Trio in Hill Aud.
Benoit asserted the economic of the art department, has been 8:30 p.m.-The Newman Stu-
ramifications of reduced defense appointed consultant to the Chi- dent Association will present the
spending in this country would re- cago Public Schools in connection first program in its Modern Music
sult in some basic problems con- with their proposed new arts pro- Series, "Music for Piano, Voice
cerning overall economic stability. gram. He will speak March 9 at and Flute," at the Newman Center,
Because the defense industry I the Sir George Williams Univer- 331 Thompson St.
employs more scientists and tech- sity in Montreal in connection SUNDAY, JAN. 24
nicians than any other industry it with the recent recommendations 4:15 p.m.-Prof. Ralph Herbert
would be economically impractical of the Royal Commission on Edu- of the music school will sing 14

(Continued from Page 1)
Another question raised byj

these deans refers
a student taking
credit pays as
taking 17.

to the fact thatI
eight hours of
much as one

use the actual teaching costs as a
barometer, as it would be too dif-
ficult to ascertain the facility
costs per student or per activity,
he added.
"The classroom and teaching,
costs may not be the most valid
instrument to use in the reduc-
tion of fees, but it is the easiest
to evaluate," Dorr said.
While a part-time student may

Before 1962, students taking
nine credits or less were consider-
ed part-time. Now anyone electing
eight hours or more a semester
pays full semester fees.
"Perhaps the time has come for
the University to revise the fee
schedule and evaluate the nature
and cost of the facilities offered,"
Dorr said, reflecting on the as-
sumptions of the Fee Committee.

to attempt to place displaced de- cation.I

lieder by Franz S
recital in Rackham

fense employes in peace time in-

* * -

dustry. SATURDAY, JAN. 23
Under the same circumstances 8 a.m. - Speech Dept. Cham-
the Soviet Union and European 1 pionship Debate Tournament in Establish
countries would not face the same Trueblood Aud.
problems as the U.S., Benoit said. 3 p.m.-Thomas A. McClain, a Gijf. t
Because the Soviet economy is teacher of Christian Science from\
controlled by the government an Chicago will lecture on "Riding
employe can be assimilated from Easy in the Harness" at the First Establishment of
one portion of the economy to Church of Christ, Scientist, 1833 Gift Receiving Off
another without serious conflict. Washtenaw Ave. announced by W.

Schubert in a !
Lecture Hall.
New
Offie
a University
fice has been
K. Pierpont,

f
t
3
I
1

PROF. EMILE BENOIT

put into effect yet; however it is
expected to be implemented, at
least in the destruction of some
obsolete bombers. If the plan
proves itself workable it would be
expanded to include both this
country's and Russia's super-
sonic bombers.

Unemployed
Benoit proposed that unem-
ployed defense workers utilize the
research facilities of the Defense
Department, studying the many
basic scientific research problems
which exist but wither from lack
of funds. He pointed to expanded
marine biology and oceanography
research as an example. Benoit
contended money being spent on
destruction will soon be spent on
construction.

I4:30 p.m.-The Wolverines play
Purdue in basketball at Yost Field
House.
7:00 p.m.-B. K. Nehru, Indian
ambassador to the U.S., will de-!
liver the Indo-American Sports
Association Lecture in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild will present D W. Griffith's
"Intolerance" in the Architecture
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-IQC will present Ella
Fitzgerald and the Oscar Peter-

vice-president for business and
finance.
The office has been set up be-
cause of the increasing fund rais-
ing activity of many University
units and because of the need to
provide an appropriate acknowl-
edgement by the University for
all gifts received, Pierpont ex-
plained.
The functions of the office will
be to receive, acknowledge, ac-
count for and report all gifts
presented to the University.

X;
t
t
1

Part-Time
Students taking a part-time
schedule seem to be paying more I
per credit-hour, but it is wrong
to judge campus participation by
this criterion alone, Dorr said. Be-
sides classroom use and the use
of educational facilities such as
libraries and laboratories, the
part-time student participates in
the activities of the Michigan Un-
ion or the Women's League as
well as the special lectures, col-
loquia and exhibits the University
offers, he continued.
"What the student does during
the semester is relatively unim-
portant. What matters is the fact
that the University makes many
facilities available to him," Dorr
said.
To charge tuition on a per-
credit-hour basis would call for
a complete revision of policy, he
added. Pricing on the semester
hours system is characteristic of
non - residential municipal col-
leges because at these institutions
a great percentage of both the
full- and part-time students live
at home, Dorr explained.
More Facilities
At a residential university, the
institution makes many more fa-
cilities available to the student,
thus taking the tuition off a per-
credit hour basis, he continued.
"The fee is a flat one based on
the use of facilities, not the teach-
ing and classroom expenses," he
said.
Commenting on the existence of
the part-time fee problem, Dorr
said that lighter academic sched-
ules are permitted because stu-
dents can have legitimate claims,
such as illness or financial dis-
tress, to warrant a smaller pro-
gram. The graduated fees, how-
ever, for part-time study, come
from lesser classroom and teach-
ng costs, not from lessened fa-
cility use, Dorr explained.
Teaching Costs
The easiest way to reduce tui-
tion for part-time students is to

use the total University facility
less, he may use certain parts of R d
it more. he continued. He cited Jazz Ban
the example of a graduate student
doing research who would need
extensive library and/or labora- # ej '
tory facilities but would use other
facilities less. The University Jazz Band leaves
After the 1962 fee change, a today for a 13-week tour of Latin
general tuition hike, which affect- America as part of the Cultural
ed the part-time tuition most, Presentation Program of the State
deans of the various colleges have Department
been questioning the full-time use The 19-member student group
of campus facilities by the stu-
dents a prxmtdb h e will give performances in Gluate;-
committees approximated by the fee mala, British Honduras, Nicara-
gua, Panama, Ecuador, Bolivia,
1962 Schedule Paraguay, Brazil, Surinam, British
Following is a table of the 1962 Guiana, Trinidad, Venezuela, Haiti
schedule: and Jamaica.
Credits In-State Out-of-State Originator and director of the
2 $ 45 $115 band is Bruce Fisher, '658M.
3 55 135 Richard A. Crawford of the music
4 80 205 school will accompany the group
5 85 225 as the faculty representative.
6 90 250 Originated in 1961, the jazz
7 110 270 band has won several national
8 115 290 contests. It varies from other col-
lege jazz bands in that it is con-
In addition, students pay $6 ducted by a student rather than
Union dues or $7.50 League fees. a faculty member.

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DAILYOFFICAL BULE.I
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Read
Daily
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3654 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 23
Day Calendar
Basketball-U-M vs. Purdue: Yost
Field House, 4:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-D. W. Griffith's "In-
tolerance": Architecture Aud. 7 and 9
p.m.
Indo-American Sports Association Lec-
ture-D. K. Nehru, Indian ambassador
to the U.S.: Rackham Lecture Hall,
7:30 p.m.
Speech Dept. Championship Debate
Tournament-.-Trueblood Aud., 8 a.m.
History Make-up Examinations will be
held Saturday, January 23, 10-12 a.m.
in Room 2429'Mason Hall. Please con-
sult your instructor and then sign
the list in the History Office, 3601 Ha-
ven Hall.

Michigan Marching Band: Members of The Mary Louise Hinsdale Scholar- Ushers: Ushers are very urgently
the Marching Band who will be per- ship, amounting to approximately $180 needed for the Ella Fitzgerald Concert
forming at the Basketball game this (interest on the endowment fund) is tonight, Sat., Jan. 23, and any persons
Sat., Jan. 23, are NOT to wear uniforms. available to undergraduate single wom- who are interested in ushering for this
Dress will be exactly as it was at the en who are wholly or partially self- event will please report to the east
last game. Enter the North end of the supporting and who do not live in door of Hill Aud. no later than 7:30
Field House through the door closest to University residence halls or sorority p.m. this evening, Jan. 23. See Mr.
State Street to obtain admission ticket, houses. Girls with better than aver- Warner.
age scholarship and need will be
considered. n

4-1 1 A~T ."

UI- AW Abnn Wk'nz XIt

"FREE SPEECH MOVEMENT"
Documentary LP Record
University of California
STUDENT SIT-INS, RALLIES,
POLICE ACTION, SPEECH
HIGHLIGHTS, ETC.
Made from on-the-scene tapes
Order from Dept. M, Station KPFA,
2207 Shattuck, Berkeley 4, Calif.
$3.25
Pre-paid Orders Only

G eneral otces I The Laurel Harper Seeley Scholarship I
is open to both graduate and under- 1t
graduate women. The award is made ANNOUNCEMENTS:-
ro Students Who Expect to Earn on basis of scholarship, contribution
Graduate Degrees at the end of the to University life and financial need, Attention: Recent Grads & Seniors - e
Fall and Winter Terms: Graduates may the stipend is variable. State of Calif. announces competitiveh
elect to receive the large diploma (size The Lucy E. Elliott Fellowship is exam for Aquatic Biologists. Positions I
13 x 17 ) without additional ctt open to women graduates of any cover biol. research, mgmt., & water
the Diploma Clerk no later than 60 accredited collegeruniversity. It may ipject stappl Dctienadlin ean. .BuDe-
days before the closing date of the graduated by a UniversityofuMichigan ta.
term in which the degree is earned, ut graduate at any college or university
but a graduate of any other univer- jt
sity will be required to study on the POSITION OPENINGS:
Lectureships Still Available under Ful- Michigan campus. Academic achieve- State of Michigan-Institution Social
bright-Hays Act: A list of lectureships ment, creativity and leadership will be Worker. BA, bkgd. in soc. sciences.
abroad in the period ending July, considered in granting the award. Tne Aug. grads eligible. Application dead-
1966, may be consulted in the Gradu- stipend is s1,100. line Feb. 8. Located throughout Mich.
ate Fellowship Office, 110 Rackham The Alice Crocker Lloyd Fellowship i Allstate Insurance, Detroit - Office
Bldg. open to women graduates of any ac- Supv. Trainee, grad 23-28. Also Cas-
crediter college or university. It may ualty Underwriter. Married man with
Students Interested in Harvard Divin- i be used by a University of Michigan 3-5 yrs, exper. in general underwrit-
ity School: The Rev. Eugene Patter-bin .
son will be available for consultation graduateaatany college or university ngy
on Mon., Jan. 25. from 12 noon tQ 5 but a graduate of any other school will Production Machinery Corp., Mentor,
p~m. 352 SB. all764744 fo anbe required to study on the Michi- Ohio-Project or Sales Application En-
pp32 SAB. gCnlca64m7442foraanne campus. Academic achievement, gineer for mfr. of heavy machinery for
personality and leadership will be con- p
sidered in granting the award. The in industry. Also June grads.
For the benefit of those who cannot stipend is $1,100. *orfuterInomaio,*las cl
find a seat in the UGLI, or wouldFr trn a ,p s l
rather study elsewhere, a study hall is College of Lit., Science and Arts, and 1764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
Moedayethrough Friday in 25 Ane m Schools of Business Admin., Education, pointments,3200 SAB.
Music, Natural Resources, Nursing and1
tHall, nee d arises.in321 A monitor ispresent,Public Health: Students who received { ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-'
and smoking is not permitted. marks of I, X, or No Report at the end VIEWS-Seniors & grad students, please
of their last semester or suminer ses- sign schedule posted at 128-H W. Engrg.1
sion of attendance will receive a grade for appointments with the following
Dept. of Linguistics: Doctoral prelim- of "E" in the course or courses unless A.2-8
inary examinations will be given Fri. their work is made up. In the College JAllis-Chalmers Mfg. Co.-BS, MS &
and Sat., March 5 and 6. Students in- ofLtrtrSineadheAsadPo.:EI& ME. BCMS MS:&
tending to take one or more exams the Schools of Music, Business Adminis- E Math, E Physics & Eci Engrg. MS:
must notify the Departmental Office of tration and Nursing this date is Feb. Nuclear. R. & D., Des., Prod. & Sales.
their intention to do so on or before, 1, 1965, In the Schools. of Education, Eastman Kodak Co.-BS-MS: ChE,
Tues., Feb. 9. Natural Resources and Public Health Em.(Ken, Org. & Physical).
1 this date is by Feb. 4, 1965. Stu- I :E Phem.c (Genl. M:Isrm
Dept. of Linguistics: French and Ger- dents wishing an extension of time ys&iwoms . MNatsm struav
enan language examinations will be beyond these dates should file a peti- permanent residence visa. R. & D., Des.,
given Mon, and Tues., March 8 and 9. tion with the appropriate official of Prod
Students intending to take the exam- their school. In the School of Nursing JAN. 27-
ination must notify the Departmental the above information refers to non- Brunswick Corp.-BS-MS: EE & ME.
Office of their intention to do so on Nursing courses only. R. & D.. Des.
or before Tues., March 2. General Telephone & Electronics Labs
Inc., Bayside. L.I., N.Y.-MS-PhD: ChE,
The Martha Cook Bldg. is receiving O RGA IZA ION EE & Met. Men & women. R. & D.
applications for Fall, 1965. Present 1)Johnson & Johnson, Chicago, Ill.-
Freshmen and Sophomore women may BS-MS: CE, EM, IE & ME. BS: ChE.
apply. Please telephone NO 2-3225 for NOTICES Can consider non-citizens if becom-
an appointment. ing U.S. citizen. Dev., Des. & Prod.
Peoples Gas, Light & Coke Co., Chi-
Applications for General Undergrad- cago-BS: ChE, CE, EE, IE & ME. Des.,
uate Scholarships will beavailable at Use of This Column for Announce -P Sa.en.
the Scholarship Office, 2011 SAB, be- ments is available to officially recog- BS-MS: IE & ME.
gnni be onple ed bMahAlications nized and registered student organiza- Whitehead & Kales Co., River Rouge,
mustbae cmstdend by Mac Un- tions only. Organizations who are plan-' Mich.-BS-MS: CE & ME. Dev. & Des.
plergrduae ostudentl eses whohae tom ning to be active for the winter term __________
an overall average of 3.0 or better must be registered by Jan, 29, 1965.
are eligible to compete. Financial aid Forms are available in Room 1011 SAB.
is a factor in making these awards. flEDE NflSR 1
iu~nernw. LUUCiIL n+ honLUD P N i BL E

DIXIELAND
OLD HEIDELBERG
TON IGHT

i

I.

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-m"

DIAL 5-6290
+#.* * * * * * * . - +* + . * *4*
WALT DISNEY'S
ACH I EVEM ENT!

DOUBTING THOMAS?
HOPEFUL AGNOSTIC?.
Christianity has more to offer than hope, it has positive
proof in the form of a MIRACLE which was foretold,
described and is intensely personal Ask the Religious
Leaders or send me a card marked ESP-17. My reply is
free, non-Denominational, Christian. Martyn W. Hart,
Box 53, Glen Ridge, N. J. 07028 (USA).

r I
! s
INTOLERANCE
! !
a3
! The second of D. W. Griffith's two greatest mos- '
terpieces, INTOLERANCE has been called one of :
I
the boldest technical and creative experiments in i
screen history, It is both the forerunner of the Cecil
* B. De Mille panoramic spectacular, and the docu- v
mentary in the Soviet cinema.
f I
! The plot is structured on four parallel stories of intolerance w
* in the history of man, which in Griffith's words, "begin like
! fourcurrents looked at from a hilltop. At first the four cur-
! rents wilt flow apart slowly and quietly. But as they flow, !
! they grow nearer and nearer together, and faster and faster,
until in the end, in the last act, they mingle in one mighty
river of expressed emotion." 3
! !
Tonight and Tomorrow at 7 and 9
! !
1 !
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I I
r H I.41 M I
* IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
- ~
r I
rrr--rrrrsrrrrrrrm rmiierrrrsrrrrrrinmtm s - Wmininmm w -Wwb.

I

Fi

Concert of Contemporary Music
Music for Voice, Piano, Flute
CATHERINE HINDSON, soprano
UDO KASEMETS, composer pianist
ANN AITCHISON, flute
Sat., Jan. 23... 8:30 p.m.

JULIE .: % DICK
ANDREWS -VAN DYKE
TECHNICOLOR®
SATURDAY SHOWS ONLY
11 a.m.-1:30-4:00
6:30-9:15

Applications for the Following Schol-
arships are available in office of
alumnae secretary. Alumni Memorial
Hall; they must be returned by Feb. 12,
1965; recipients will be announced at
League Recognition Night, March 1,
1965.
The Lucile B. Conger Scholarship is
offered to in-state, undergraduate wom-
en on the basis of academic perform-
ance, contribution to University life
and financial need; the stipend is
variable.
The Margaret L. Waterman Scholar-
ship is offered to undergraduate wom-
en on the basis of academic perform-
ance, contribution to University life.
and financial need; the stipend is var-
iable.

Lutheran Student Chiapel (National
Lutheran Council), Sunday Worship
Services, Jan. 24, 9:30 a.m. and 11
a.m. (Holy Communion at 11); Sunday
evening program, 7 p.m., "The Church's
Interpretation of Sex, Dating, Pre-
marital Sex Relations, Planned Parent-
hood" with Pastor Henry Yoder, lead-
er, Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St.
and South Forest.
Unitarian Student Group, Discussion,
Jan. 24, 7 p.m., Unitarian Church.
Transportation at Markley and Union,
6:45 p.m.
Newman Student Association, Con-
cert, music for voice, piano and flute,
Jan. 23, 8:30 p.m., Newman Center, 331
Thompson St.
* * *

IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.
NEW CAR DEALER
Triumph-Volvo-
Fiat-Checker
HERB ESTES
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319 W. Huron
665-3688

Matinees $1.25
Eves. & Sunday $1.50
Children 75c

J I
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DIAL 662-6264

SHOWS START AT 1:00
2:50-4:55-7:00 & 9:05
Weekday Matinees-$1.00
Evenings & Sunday-$1.25

Ir

- M - mo

Admission $1.00

Newman Center

331 Thompson

ill.

7I _ __._..__ _ .

The Luan Peckinpaugh Scholarship is Council of Student Religious Organi-k
offered to out-of-state undergraduate zations, Conference on student religious
women who have successfully completed organizations, officers and representa- I
their freshman year and have a dem- tives from student religious organiza-
onstrated financial need, the stipend tions urged to attend, Jan. 24, 2-4
is variable. p.m., 3511 SAB.

You are invited to hear

RIDING EASY IN THE HARNESS
by
Thomas A. McClain, C.S.
Member of the Board of Lectureship of The
Mother Church, The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts
Saturday, January 23, 1965
3:00 P.M.

1

1000 TO 2000 WORDS A MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION AND RETENTION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to read DOWN the page comprehending at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words
a minute. And retention is excellent. This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read
every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual material
as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will allow you to accomplish-in your
required reading and also in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED
READING method. In this way the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external
equipment in reading.
A class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught on Tuesday evenings at the

DIAL 8-6416
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ACADEMY AWARD
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"BRILLIANTLY
DONE!"
-8osiey crowther, N Y. Tmes
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INGMAR BERGMAN'S
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