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May 19, 1966 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1966-05-19

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,PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. MAY 19. 1969

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY T1flTR~nAY. 1WAV 1O Iflulil , . .~ .W4W

. .liiJ iVl.7il.l; ii 1 lAi 1 7 1VVV

Viet Nam Prediction Game-United States Loses

By The Associated Press
How accurate have United States
leaders been in assessing develop-
ments and prospects in embattled,
tumultuous South Viet Nam?
A recapitulation of some of their
less lucky statements about a frus-
trating war in a frustrating coun-
try suggests that a pattern has
geen repeating itself over and
over with deadly regularity.
Events mock the assessments,
the predictions and the sometimes
guarded optimism of harassed U.S.
administration leaders.
Signals, Omens
Absence of an ambassador from
his post in Saigon can be almost
a signal for some new and shock-
ing development. A U.S. strategy
conference in Honolulu can be
transformed into an omen of Sai-
gon turmoil to come.
Time after time Washington ex-
presses surprise at a sudden stor-
my development in Saigon's poli-
tics. Now, once again, Washing-

ton is surprised as it looks at a
new crisis, this one evoking echoes
of the 1963 turmoil which brought
down the regime of President Ngo
Dinh Diem.
The current upheaval came
while Ambassador Henry Cabot
Lodge was in Washington for con-
sultations. This pattern is familiar
too,
Summer, 1963
,In the summer of 1963, the fate-
ful Buddhist crisis built up during
the vacation of Ambassador Fred-
erick Nolting.
The crisis was at a high tem-
perature when he returned. Be-
fore his departure, with Lodge
about to succeed him, Nolting
Nolting made a prediction:
"Victory over the Viet Cong in
my judgment is well on its way
in Viet Nam, provided only that
unity of purpose and perseverance
in action are not weakened by in-
ternal dissension."

The~ internail dissepnsion was al- retortedp to TPes~it John F.'Ken- I

ready there and burning furiously.
Taylor's Year
In his one year as ambassador,
July 1964 to June 1965, Gen. Max-'
well D. Taylor ieft Saigon for
Washington four times. During
three of those absences there were
political upheavals in Saigon. Only
once did Taylor return to find
in office the same men who were
there when he left.
Administration figures such as
Defense Secretary Robert S. Mc-
Namara and Rusk have been fre-
quently unlucky with assessments
and predictions regarding the
Viet Nam war. U.S. military men.
too. frequently were confounded
by the frustrating way events de-
veloped in Viet Nam.
Perhaps the least lucky with
predictions and assessments has
been McNamara.
In September, 1963, McNamara
and Taylor visited Viet Nam. They

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nedy "their judgment that the
major part of the U.S. military
task can be completed by the end
of 1965" and that the need for
major U.S. involvment would end
then.
Military Coup
Two months later a military
coup brought down the Diem
regime.
Rusk and NcNamara wen to
Honolulu for a crisis conference
and total support was expressed
for the new top man, Naj. Gen.
Duong Van Minh.
At the end of 1963. McNamara
expressed optimism about pros-
pects for 1964, noting that the
rate of Communist attacks had
"declined dramatically." On Jan.
27, 1964, he noted that Minh's
government "has considerably
more popular support than its
predecessor and the military revo-
lutionary committee is beginning
to take action to intensify military
operations and improve civil ad-
ministration."
Three days later Minh was
evicted by a coup and Maj. Gen.
Nguyen Khanh was in. Minh had
been going downhill all along. And
the fact of 1964 was that Commu-
nist attacks, rather than declining,
increased in intensity.
Delighted
A few days later McNamara
said he and President Johnson
were delighted with Gen. Khanh's
plans to step up the war. On Feb.
18 he said "the United States will
pull out most troops by 1965. even
if the anti-Communist drive fal-
ters" in Viet Nam. Keeping all
American troops in South Viet
Nam, he said. "would be a waste
of our personnel."
What if the South Vietnamese
effort should cave in?
"I don't believe that pouring in
hundreds of thousands of troops
is the solution," said McNamara.
He said the administration had
no plans to do so.
Today there are 255,000 U.S.
troops in Viet Nam.
After a visit to Saigon in March.
1964, McNamara remarked: "I
think Gen. Khanh has got-it now.
I was most impressed with their
pacification program and now all

we have to do is help administer
it." The pacification program had
difficulty getting off the ground.
McNamara, who had made
many public demonstrations of
support for Khanh in South Viet
Nam, was back there again in May,
1964, with Taylor, and the two
reported "excellent progress."
In June, 1964, administration
representatives consulted in Hono-
lulu on the Viet Nam situation.
Lodge left Saigon to campaign in
presidential primaries and Tay-
lor took his place. And a storm
was brewing.
Suddenly Khanh, under heavy
political pressure. announced he
was stepping out as premier. A
civilan became premier, and Sai-
gon floundered for a while under
civilian rule sponsored by the
military.
This - August, 1964 - was the
month of "escalation." Commu-
nist gunboats attacked U.S. war-
ships in the Tonkin Gulf, and the
Americans retaliated with air
strikes against the gunboats' base
in North Viet Nam.
In July, 1965, McNamara was
back in South Viet Nam. now un-
der Ky's rule after a bewildering
series of coups and political man-
euvers. He noted a deterioration
in the situation since he had last
been there 14 months before. But
in November, 1965, ending yet an-
other visit, he said his most dra-
matic impression was that "We
have stopped losing the war."
Last week, McNamara conceded
that political turmoil in South
Viet Nam cut U.S. military effect-
iveness, but he predicted "that
will terminate shortly."
Then South Viet Nam blew up
again.
Early this year President John-
son traveled to Honolulu and gave
his personal endorsement to Ky
and the chief of state, Lt. Gen
Nguyen Van Thieu, as young lead-
ers determined that a social revo-
lution should not wait until the
guns went silent. He said "The
leaders of both governments are
determined that we shall move
forward."
There are some who say now
that the Honolulu meeting was a
mistake, indeed a political blun-

der. It foretokened new political
trouble in South Viet Nam.
Some commentators pointed out
that the display of U.S. patron-
age for Ky offended feelings of
national sovereignty and dignity in
South Viet Nam. And Ky appeared
to be emboldened by the meeting
to take a firm stand against a
military rival in the 1st Corps
area-the scene of the latest big
explosion.
Taylor. too, has had trouble
with prognostication. Four years
ago he said he was impressed with
what South Viet Nam was doing
under Diem and commented:
"They are on the right track." The
Diem regime was derailed a year
later.
In April, 1964, Taylor publicly
opposed the idea of using Ameri-
can troops "as the direct means of
suppressing the guerillas." They
are being used for that now.
In March, 1965, Taylor said he
had "a feeling things are turning
for the better" in Viet Nam. And
when he was leaving Saigon to be
succeeded by Lodge, Taylor re-
marked that "The future is cer-
tainly more hopeful than it was
a year ago." He would make no
predictions on how or when the
war would end, saying it would
take time.
"We are on the right track,"
said Taylor. i,
Ph. 483-4680
Enhancte on CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 7 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
Shown at
3:25 and 11:50

SUNDAY, MAY 22,8 P.M
Dancing-Hobnobbing-Refreshments

V

1429 Hill St.

Gilck Social Hall

Admission Free

A CHiLDREN'S CONCERT
of Folk Singing and Dancing
SATURDAY, JUNE 4-11 A.M. and 2 P.M.
SLAUSON JUNIOR H.S. AUDITORIUM
Children 50c Adults $1 .00
Order tickets by calling 665-9935 or 662-5996
or purchase them at Shipman's (both stores),
Kiddie Korner, and at the door.
SPONSORED BY THE CHILDREN'S COMMUNITY SCHOOL

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Dailyassumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mumof two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, MAY 19
Day Calendar
Programmed Learning for Business
Workshop-Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Nutrition in Nursing Education Work-
ship-Registration, Rackham Lobby, 9
a.m.
General Notices
French and German Objective Test:
The Objective Test in French and'
German administered by the Graduate
School for doctoral candidates is sched-
uled for Thurs. evening, May 26, from
7 to 9 p.m. in the Rackham Lecture
Hall. ALL students planning to take
the objective test must register by
May 25 at the Reception Desk of the
Graduate School Office in the Rack-
ham Bldg.
For further infirmation call the Re-
ception Desk, Office of the Graduate
School, 764-4402.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
U.S. Civil Service-Announces exams
for two positions as Recreation Spe-
cialist GS-5 and GS-7 levels. Open-
ingsat McGuire Air Force Base, N.J.
4 yr. degree with specialization in Arts
and Crafts, Dramatics, Social Activi-
ties, Sports, or combination of above.
Three years of experience in above
fields. File Form 57 and card form
5001-ABC, notification of necessity to
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
* .
India Student's Association, A film,
"Gumrah," May 21, 7 p.m., Aud. A,
Angell Hall,
Lutheran Student Chapel, Ascension
Day services, Thurs., May 19, 7:30 p.m.,
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Young Friends, Recreation & plan-
ning for the summer (bring a sack
supper), May 19, 5:30 p.m., Friends
Meeting House, 1420 Hill St.

take test received later. Further in-
formation at the Bureau~.
Jewish Educational Alliance, Savan-
nah, Ga.-Program aid position open
for grad with degree in field related
to social work. Some work exper. in
Jewish Comm. Center prog. or comp.
recreation, teaching, or camp setting.
An interest in Jewish life and an orien-
tation toward Jewish values.
Johnson and Johnson, Chicago, Ill.
-Production Supervisors, 10 trainee po-
sitions. Desire recent grads willing to
work any shift in a flexible schedule.
No specific major, or exper. necessary.
Latin American Teaching Fellowship
Program-Fellowships in S. American
universities. Two years of grad school
required for opportunity to do work
and further research. 6 mos. training,
Argentina, Brazil and Chile, Portuguese
or Spanish fluency required before de-
parture. Time commitment not to ex-
ceed 18 mos. Applications and brochure
available at Bureau of Appointments.
Management Consultants, N.Y. Area
-Marketing specialist for chemical cor-
poration. All phases of marketing an-
alysis, implementation, prices, fore-
cast, College degree in Chemistry pref-
erable with some grad work in Bus.
Ad. 5-10 yrs. exper. in marketing re-
search and product management in the
chemical industry.
Management Consultants, N.Y. Area
r ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER
Best Supporting Actor

-Senior Financial Analyst. Degree in
Bus. Ads, MBA desirable, exper, with
large firm necessary.
* * *
For further inform Ftion please call
764-7460,mGeneral Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-'
United Airlines, iPttsburgh, Pa. -
Looking for a girl who will be 20 by
July 27 and finished her sophomore
year. Learn to be a stewardess be-
ginning June 20. Your junior and sen-
ior year you will be their representa-
tive on campus. Details at Summer
Placement Service, 212 SAB, Lower Lev-
el.
J. Kazloff, Inc., Detroit-Accountant
or bookkeeper for fish market. You
can start immediately. Salary open. De-
tails at Summer Placement Service, 212
SAB.
Announcement: Summer Placement
Service at 212 SAB is open year around
Students interested in jobs after the
first summer session should come in
and look things over. Camps, resorts
business and industry are still looking
for people, especially camps. Typists
are needed all over the country. WE,
have the jobs if you will take them.
* * a
Details at Summer Placement, 212
SAB, Lower Level.

TO BE INCLUDED IN THE FIRST HUNT
ENTRIES ARE DUE BY FRIDAY, MAY 20
Picture yourself walking across the Diag . . , suddenly a giant bat (dis-
guised as a paper airplane) comes swooping down and lacerates your
jugular veins. Another kill, another point for the successful hunter. Or
would you believe a shark attacking you in the Fishbowl?
Yes, that exciting new campus game, "The Hunt", has arrived at Mi-
chigan. Patterned after the movie The Tenth Victim it gives the
players a chance to. release their emotions, meet interesting people,
and have a killing good time. The game will be played during the
Spring-term with a party for the players at the end. Participants will
be randomly matched through the use of I.BM cards.
GENERAL RULES (Details on- joining)

4."

1.
2.
3.
4.

Each hunt will last four days.
One point will be given for each successful kill.
Two points for a technically brilliant kill. (Coroner's decision).
If the hunter is killed by the victim he loses one point.

ALSO
Shown at 10:20 only
"SKY DIVERS" IN COLOR
2 COLOR CARTOONS

I

5. If the hunter kills an innocent bystander he loses two points.
6. The simulated kill must involve a physical touch by the instrument
of destruction. The Coroners will judge the merits of each kill.
7. The executor must document the kill by a brief description of the
kill signed by the victim (hunter or hunted).
8. Decision of the Coroners is final.
THE* UNT
HOW TO JOIN
1. Send $3.00 along with your name, address, age, major, height,
weight, and sex to 1412 CAMBRIDGE, ANN ARBOR.
2. Before each hunt you will either be sent the name and information
on your victim or you will be notified that you are a hunted.
3. You will receive a sophisticated card that identifies you as a mem-
ber of "THE HUNT", and incidently puts you in the same class
as Bond, or if you are really good perhaps Maxwell Smart. .. .
4. The first hunt will begin on May 23, 1966. Participants will be
sent detailed instructions prior to that time.
5. For information on how this game has worked on other campuses
read TIME, May 13, 1966, page 70.

'

"WILDLY
~; f1,<va . COMICI
YUSHOULD
CERTAINLY
((z SEE ITI"
HARPLL il .Y.TIN"e
HELD OVER
CAMPUS

I.

DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY

The stoFy of a woman curved like a weapon - a weapon out to avenge a wrong

MICHIGAN

ENDS TONIGHT
4 Shows Today at
0- 3:30 - 6:15 - 9:00 P.M.

The story of a woman curved like a weapon -a weapon out to avenge a wrong
beyond words, beyond imagining, even, perhaps, beyond avenging....
SOPnIA IREN
ji-oror

Jack Lemmon Naalie
"The Great Race"

TECHNICOLOR@

-I

COMING FRIDAY
ROSALIND RUSSELL HAYLEY MILLS
"THE TROUBLE WITH ANGELS"

I 1

Elektra Recording Artist
PHIL OCHS E
in, concert
HILL AUDITORIUM
Friday, May 20, 8:30 P.M.

I
t y
v
I
f
I

Al

Nona

a U
# Ii
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
I I
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR::
a I
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
U I
First Showing in Ann Arbor
r I
I
CHRLE Starring;
CHALIECHAPLI N &BUSTER KEATON
04 w w o* f p !-- - - -a w- w - r- t, wA

"Ochs

is angry, clever, perceptive"

-N. Y. Times
TICKETS: $3.00-2.50-2.00 on sale at

.:.

V U

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