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May 10, 1966 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1966-05-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MAY,10, 1966

75TH ANNIVERSARY:
Journalists Gather for Event

Announce Porter To Succeed
71 aurer as Journalism Chief

STUDENT BOOK SGRVICG
Books, Supplies, and
Tremendous Posters

(Continued from Page 1)
honest servive as "the ability to
do one's work well despite all
limitations of audience, ignorance
and inertia, difficulties of com-
munications, and abounding crass-
ness."
"The quality of the best practice
in journalism .is as high if not
higher than in any of the profes-
sional pursuits represented on this
campus," Maurer emphasized.
He attributed this quality to a
mentality of "incorrigible curios-
ity, incorrigible independence and
a passion to study."
Maurer pointed to the relation
of journalism to universities by
citing the "educational rooting
through which the profession may
draw recruits of commitment to
the public weal and by determina-
tion to sharpen the tools to im-
prove the service."
The war in Viet Nam was much
on the minds of some panelists
during discussions on the role of
journalism as a profession, the
meaning of information and the
challenge of change.
"The U.S. press has become ex-
cessively responsible-a spokesman
and partner of the government
rather than a censor," Alan Barth,
editorial writer for the Washing-
ton Post argued.
He attributed unquestioning
newspaper support of government
policies in "foreign adventures"
to patriotism. But "criticism, con-
structive and sound, is often a
higher form of love for country
than mere flag waving," he said.
"'My country right or wrong'
when espoused by newspapers con-
stitutes a total abdication of re-
sponsibility," he said.
"In international affairs more
than any other area, a newspaper
must prove and challenge, asking
whether national policies serve all
of mankind as well.
"Constant, carping criticism
may irritate officials but it oper-
ates to keep them up to the mark,
raises the caliber and quality of
government," Barth said.
In Viet Nam, "we are in a situa-
tion we should have faced and
foreseen before we got into it,"
he commented.

The responsibility of the press
is to look critically at all the gov-
ernment does abroad as well as at
home, he empahsized.
"We should remember what it
is we must be vigilant about-the
power of our own government-
the sometimes reckless, dangerous,
oppressive power of ourselves,"
Barth concluded.
Lester Markel, associate editor
of the New York Times, decried
the inadequacies of most news-
papers in covering foreign news.
"We cannot have understand-
ing among the peoples of the
world unless they know each other
better and discard false concepts
of one another," he said.
"American public opinion is the
most important public opinion in
the world because of the power of
the U.S., but the 'great debate' on
Viet Nam has been too charged
with emotion and based too little
on fact," Market contended.
He called for more news inter-
pretation and increased space for
informational content rather than
entertainment in newspapers.
"Newspapers must be an in-
spiration as well as an institution
and a business," he said,
Markel called on editors to try
to educate readers to a higher level
of interest in news and to fulfill
their two major assignments-
objective, interpretive coverage of
international and national news,
all of which has inevitable local
impact and ramifications.
Arthur Gallagher, editor of the
Ann Arbor News asked the mass
media to find ways of "spoon-
feeding more information to the
public which is mentally lazy and
content to let decisions be made
by a small group of experts." He
pointed to credibility as one of
the major problems of the press.
"We must give more serious
thought to the manner in which
we present information or we will
all be overwhelmed by information
itself," Frank Angelo, managing
editor of the Detroit Free Press
warned.
"One of our main problems is
putting information into perspec-
tive for readers, and getting our

audience to read the information
we provide," he said.
Another panelist, Frank Hop-
kins, director of U.S. Programs
and Services in the State Depart-
ment, insisted "we can't look at
the world situation solely from our
own perspectives. We must take
into account other, foreign view-
points and understand them."
He cited the role of the press in
furthering such understanding as
crucial.
Ingrid Jewel, Washington cor-
respondent for the Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette, pointed to increased
tempo and development rather
than outright change as the key
to differences between the 1920's
and the current period.
Speed rather than enlighten-
ment has been characteristic of
the period," she said.
"It is the 'why' that makes re-
porting difficult today, since it is
so often elusive," she adde.
A report on the journalism de-
partment's post-graduate intern-
ship was also released at yester-
day's meetings.
Two-year training programs on
newspapers, advertising agencies
and broadcasting stations across
the nation have resulted from the
intensive efforts in this field.
Forty-four such training pro-
grams have resulted for post-
graduate University students in
journalism. The undergraduate
program has contributed 40 post-
A.N. one-year internships, primar-
ily on Michigan community news-
papers. Another 40 students from
overseas have been given a year's
academic instruction on the cam-
pus.
Since the program was nation-
ally announced in 1952, more than
175 internships have been awarded.
Full salaries are paid to students
who participate in the program.
They continue their enrollment in
the University at a reduced fee
while training on the cooperating
medium and they submit monthly
reports to the journalism depart-
ment on studies of community
problems. Supervising e d i t o r s
maintain careful observation of
the intern's professional develop-
ment.

(Continued from Page 1)
Foundation project which studied
the impact of the development of
mass communication on society
and education.
At Iowa State University, Porter
was a special assistant to the pres-
ident and served on numerous
boards and committees.
The dinner honoring Maurer al-
so featured an address by John
Pemberton, executive secretary of
the American Civil Liberties Union
Pemberton cited the importance
of journalism in the development
of attitudes vital to a free society.
"We do not have a free society
today; rather, it is an 'open socie-
ty,' a term which includes a use-
ful connotation of relativity,"
Pemberton said.
The accumulated tensions re-
sulting from rapid social change
create immense tensions which
pose threats to an increase in so-
ciety's openness, he said.
He foresaw the role of the press
in an open society as that of a
communicator among the people
not only to the people.
He pointed out the limitations
on press freedom which are im-
plied in the First Amendment. In
case of a "clear and present dan-
ger of substantive evil as a result
of the exercise of free speech and
a free press," there are restric-
tions on that freedom.
During Porter's four years in
the journalism department, he has
taught courses in history of the
American press, national and
United Nations reporting, press

law and the role of mass media in
society. He has also been raculty
counselor in journalism.
He sees the future of the de-
partment as bright, with prospects
for expansion favorable.
Journalism education has come
in for severe criticism from aca-
demicians in recent years, notably
in a magazine article last year by
the late David Boroff. He con-

tended that journalism depart-
ments lacked creativity and ex-
citement and concentrated on
technical routine at the expense
of a broad liberal education.
The University's department,
Porter notes, has always been
oriented toward a non-technical
approach with stress on historical
and analytical analyses of the
press in society.

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(Continued from Page 1) has incorporated in New Jersey as
Volume for the day was 9.3 mil- a step toward possibly moving all
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siderably less than Friday's 13.1 state, Keith Funston, exchange
million shares, the third largest in president, announced yesterday,
the history of the New York Stock The exchange has raised the
Exchange. possibility of leaving New York
GM was down $2.38 at $85. Ford because of a proposed 50 per cent
lost $1 at $47.25 and Chrysler $1.50 increase by the city in the stock-
at $43.50. transfer tax.
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much biggerlosses s proposed amendment to New Jer-
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Northwest Airlines $13 to $187; state stock transfer tax "obvious-
Northw1toirnes$1;and Tex$as7;ly will be an important factor for
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The Associated Press average of Board of 'Governors as it continues
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4

By JEFFREY K.CHASE
The Saturday May Festival con-
certs in Hill Aud. evidenced the
talent of the two Philadelphia
Orchestra conductors in the direc-
tion of their group.
In the afternoon assistant con-
ductor William Smith gave a read-
ing of the Tchaikowsky Symphony
No. 5 which was breath taking to
the audience and gave the musi-
cians the feeling that something
special was in the air. Drama,
pacing, tension, rhythmic drive,
sense of line, and form were all
present in that proper proportion
necessary to create the memorable
performance which turned an old
warhorse into a seemingly fresh
and vital composition.
The remainder of the concert
included readings of Prokofiev's
"Lieutenant Kije" Suite and the
Handel-Casadesus viola concerto
in B minor, with Joseph de Pas-
quale as soloist.
In the evening Eugene Ormandy
mounted the podium for the
Beethoven Fifth Symphony, theI
Brahms Second Symphony, and
his own transcription of the Bach
Toccata and Fugue in D minor.
Each was played well; with the
kind of excitement one expects
from the Philadelphia group. This
is' how an "average" concert by
this orchestra should sound. It
has so much talent and we arej
always excited to hear what itI
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The evening concert represented
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chestra and, following a few short
sentences, Ormandy and the or-
chestra played a transcription of
a Bach chorale with a certain
tenderness and sensitivity which
ended the special evening.
Sunday's performance concluded
the May Festival. That afternoon
in Hill Aud. Thor Johnson direct-
ed the Philadelphia Orchestra in
performances of Leonard Bern-
stein's "Chichester Psalms," Del
lius' "Requiem," and Serge Pro-
kofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3.
The highlights of this event
were hearing the Bernstein music
live for the first time; listening
to the boy alto, John Bogart, who
sang the solo in the "Chichester
Psalms" so well; watching and
listening to Gary Graffman spark
the performance of Prokofiev's
concerto with his dazzling tech-
nique and his sensitive musical in-
sight.
In the evening Ormandy direct-
ed the orchestra on an exciting
journey through Aaron Coplan's
"Music for a Great City."

Then, after intermission, what
began as just another performance
of the Beethoven Ninth Symphony
bloomed into a most stimulating
and inspiring reading, especially
in the slow, lyrical third move-
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The fact that the Choral Union
Chorus contained so much po-
tential came as a great surprise.
They sang out, sang accurately,
and sang with feeling. Expressiv-
ity, a quality too often missing in
their work, shown forth and seem-
ed to mushroom through the
chorus to inspire it to even greater
achievements.
Bravo!
ENDS WEDNESDAY
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST!"
-N.Y. Past
%i N ROUGI UNf
SIDNEY,,SHELLEY
SFUI [HER \WINTERS
ELIZABETH
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