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May 07, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-05-07

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 7, 1966

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MAY 7, 1988
#12 12 1

T

FILMS
'Great Race' Loses;
Only Lemmon Wins

California Group Hits
'Red Activity' at Berkeley,

MUSIC
Orchestra Offers Unfamiliar Works

By JAMES SCHUTZE

gets, cute devices, some good land-

"The Great Race" is not another scape, some exercrable jokes, and
common and inane movie. The a girl who runs around in her

producers of this show have gone
to great lengths, unheard of ex-

underwear all day.
Jack Lemmon keeps the theatre

pense and incredible creative toil, I from emptying immediately after

to invent a thoroughly new andi
excitingly unique variety of mali-
cious stupidity.
Of course, many little people
will object angrily that, "well, they
intended this movie to be stupid,
because they wanted it to enter-
tain us."
One does not ask that every
movie be a fresh triumph for
drama, photography, poetry, and
mankind. One seeks humbly to
avoid indigestion One avoids
movies like "The Great Race."
Tony Curtis is the hero. He
wears white and speaks with the
accent of an Italian fruitvender
who has seen too many Cary
Grant movies. He is opposed by
Jack Lemmon, a villain. The rest
of- the cast consists of funny gad-

the movie's first line with the
hilarious portrayal of one Profes-
sor Fate, a scoundrel. Later in the
show, he plays a prince whose
ability to become King is limited
by his talent for staying drunk
most of the time.
And then there is the rest of
the show. Tony Curtis, Natalie
Wood, Peter Falk, and Jack Lem-
mon are stranded on a drifting
iceberg along with two turn-of-
the-century race cars. Natalie and
Tony are sitting in one of the
cars where Natalie is preparing
dinner for the group. Natalie
shouts, "come and get it." Peter
winks slyly to Jack. "Maybe she
doesn't mean us."
One slaps the knee.

(Continued from Page 1)
Francisco bay area but said that
it is a mistake to consider the
campus "a center for sexual de-
viation."
The committee reported that
campus dances with lewd themes
and blatant promiscuity and the
presentation of "disgusting, debas-
ed spectacles," were taking place.
Educational Leader
Heyns, a former University vice-
president, commenting on the
charges at Kerr, said, "President
Kerr is a recognized educational
leader. I came here to work with
him and I have faith in his lead-
ership and commitment to the
state and the nation. If there. is
serious doubt among the respon-
sible leaders of this state about
his leadership or mine I suggest
that they quickly resolve it. Mean-
while, we here at the Berkeley
campus intend to go about our
business of building an even great-
er university."
Charges that Kerr was "hos-
tile" to the committee and their
aims were made. The members
added that Kerr did not 'help in
seeking out Communist activities
on campus "but actually took steps
that tended to prevent this from
occurring."

Student opinion of the report
was reflected in the statement
made by Jerry Goldstein, presi-
dent of the student body. "As a
student at Berkeley I was most
disturbed to learn that the Burns
Committee has chosen to issue a
second biased report. Our campus
has begun to gain its composure
in dealing with its problems. It is
time that the state gain its com-
posure in living with the univer-
sity. Cal is not a haven for Com-
munism. Her students are hard
working, dedicated, intelligent and
patriotic. At the same time they
question hypocrisy and critically
analyze and modify such radical
views as Communism and Fascism
-the extremes of our world."
Free University
Kerr, in stating his aims for ad-
ministering Berkeley, said, "a uni-
versity, by its nature, is dedicated
to freedom in a free society. It can
become consequently an arena for
dissent. It is also a great source
of progress. The freedom and the
progress go hand in hand. We
support both. We also support the
principle of fair play."

By JEFFREY K. CHASE
Program
Kodaly-Concerto for Orchestra
Kodaly-Te Deum
Bartok-Concerto No. 1 for
Piano and Orchestra
What the two best known
twentieth century Hungarian com-
posers have been doing musically
was the theme of last evening's
May Festival concert in Hill Aud.
Chances are that all three of
these works were unfamiliar to
many in the audience-and this is
good. An audience can get tired
of hearing the same music again
and again, and appreciates an op-
portunity to expand its repertoire
of familiar themes and rhythms.
Kodaly's "Concerto for Orches-
tra," unlike the much more pro-
found and searching same-named
work by Bartok, has foot-tapping
rhythms in the three allegro por-
tions and sensuous tone coloring
in the two intervening slower sec-
tions. The Philadelphia Orchestra,
conducted by Thor Johnson, gave
a spirited reading which captured
the essence of the thing.

The vocal offering, Kodaly's
"Te Deum," featuring the Univer-
sity Choral Union Chorus and di-
rected by Mr. Johnson, carried a
certain power and sense of lined
which fulfilled its opening phrase:
"We praise Thee, O God, We
acknowledge Thee to be the Lord."!
Soloists Jennifer Vyvyan, Lili
Chookasian, Waldie Anderson, and
Sherrill Milnes sang their parts
with ease and conviction.
Gyorgy Sandor,.professor in the
School of Music, played the Bar-
tok Concerto with authority; and
why not? Being a pupil and friend
of both Kodaly and Bartok, he's
I

in the "in crowd" when it comes
to music of these composers.
And Sandor's digital devterity
leaves one wondering how he
played the first movement so
cleanly long after he has begun
the second.
Eugene Ormandy conducted tle
orchestral complement and, to-
gether with Mr. Sandor, kept the
rhythmic drive, the percussive
attacks and the harmonic disson-
ances lively to the end.
Unrelating applause greeted Mr.
Sandor's bows until he again sat
at the piano and Ormandy mount-

ed the conductor's podium. They
repeated the final movement of
the Bartok concerto with a certain
taut excitement which was not
present before. The audience thus
experienced how it can affect a
performer to do his best.
Somehow when a performer
senses that he is expected to be
great he gets an extra burst of
energy to be just that. Mr. San-
dor's Ann Arbor neighbors were
with him all the way,
It seems that the orchestra has
adapted once again to Ann Arbor's
climate for their Ann Arbor mus-
ical offering.

..,., ..... ......................................................................>
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-,
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, MAY 7
Day Calendar
No Events Scheduled.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Jerome
James Donnelly, English Language &

Literature; thesis: "The Concept of
Night: Its Use and Metamorphosis in
the Poetry of the Eighteenth Century,"
Sat., May 7, 1600 Haven Hall, at 2 p.m.
Chairman, N. E. Nelson.
Voice-Students for a Democratic So-
ciety: Mon., May 9, 8 p.m., Room 30
Michigan Union, summer school, Twen-
tieth Century Revolutions; Michael
Zweig will be discussing the Chinese
revolution.
Voice-Students for a Democratic So-
ciety: Tues., May 10, 8 p.m., Room 3G
Michigan Union, general membership
meeting, election of officers, discussion
of summer plans.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Attention June and August Graduates:
Seniors and graduates with minimum of
12-15 semester hourstat U. of Michn
are eligible to register for placement

services. Come In and browse through
current positions in variety of fields
directories of schools, employers, gov-
ernment opportunities and company
literature. Hours: 8:30-12 and 1:30-4:30.
U.S. Civil Service Commission: An-
nounces exam for Anthropologist GS-11-
15 with the Smithsonian Institution
and other agencies throughout the U.S.,
of particular interest to recent PhD
graduates and currently enrolled PhD
candidates. Complete infirmation avail-
able at the Bureau
Department of State--Aid for Inter-
national Development: Announces op-
portunities for graduates in the Jun-
ior Officer Training Program. Prefer
people with advanced degrees for ca-
reers in the Foreign Service. Exten-
sive 2-yr. trng. program leading to{
overseas assignment in a variety ofI
fields. 6 mos. trng, in Wash., D.C. and
8 mos. on-the-Job trng. overseas. In-
terested students or graduates should f
submit applications (SF-57) available
at Bureau.
(Continued on Page 7)_

SUNDAY s
p MAY 8
P MICHIGAN UNION
MAIN DINING ROOM
a Breakfast 8-10 A.M.
Dinner 12:30-2:00 P.M.
5':45-7:30 P.M.
Phone 662-4431 for reservations

4 ,

Academy Award Winner
Best Supporting Actress
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Amerion
SHELLEY
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TAKE PART IN YOUR UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES

BE A B.M.O.C.

sarng
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Please Note Schedule

Tony Curtis-JackLeunuon
Natalie Wood
TAEhye Great aC*"
ED E syARDS' y oatm
The greatest comedy of all time!.

AN EXPLOSIVE STORY OF TODAY!

I~VJ )lI~III ~ 'TECHICOLOR' PANAVIStIOH' FROM WARN4ER BS#OL

4 Shows Daily at
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Short: "Lucky Star"
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