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July 22, 1966 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-07-22

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FRIDAY, JULY 22,1966

TNT MICHIGAN DAILY

i / v f+ M Win.'.

F~'RDAYJULY22, 966TE MI~hE~NDiLY

PAGE THREE

V.

_. - _ I

U.S. Piqued
With Ghandi*
Statement
Hits Communique
On Viet Nam for
Russian Language'
NEW DELHI, India (P - The
United States has conveyed to
India its displeasure with a recent
statement by Prime Minister In-
dira Gandhi on the Viet Nam
war, it was learned yesterday.
Indian officials said that while
this has created no serious prob-
lem for U.S.-India relations, U.S.
diplomats here and in Washington
expressed "irritation."
The statement in question was
the July 16 communique Mrs.
Gandhi signed in Moscow with
Soviet Premier Alexel N. Kosy-
gin after discussions on Viet Nam
U.S. officials, it was reliably re-
ported, took exception to two por-
tions of the communique:
-Mrs. Gandhi's agreement with
the Soviet demand that Ameri-
can bombing of North Viet Nam
"should be stopped immediately"
without a specific call on Hanoi
j to stop its military actions in
South Viet Nam and negotiate.
-Mrs. Gandhi's expression with
Kosygin of concern at the "de-
terioration of the international sit-
uation and mounting war dangers
which have occurred lately as a
result of the aggressive actions of
imperialist and other reactionary
forces."
This language was considered
by American diplomats to be Rus-
sian language aimed at blaming
the United States alone for the
Viet Nam war, and they are re-
ported to have expressed displeas-
u'e because Mrs. Gandhi put her
signature to it.
There have been two high-level
U.S. diplomatic contacts with In-
dia since the communique was
signed. Secretary of State Dean
Rusk talked with the Indian
charge d'affaires, S. U. Banerjee,
Sin Washington: and American
Ambassador Chester Bowles called
on Foreign Secretary T. N. Kaul
-n New Delhi.
President Johnson referred to
India and Viet Nam in his Wed-
nesday press conference in Wash-
ington.
Asked about the recurring de-
mands for the United States to
halt the bombing of North Viet;
Nam, Johnson said the United
States "had made clear to the
government of India and all other
governments" that anytime Hanoi
is willing to discuss peace, on a
few hours notice the United States
willido so.
He said he did not think "we
should spend all of our time ex-
amining what the government of
the United States might be willing
to do without any regard to what
the enemy might be willing to do."
This was the spirit of diplo-
matic contacts with India on the
communique, informants said. In-
dia's reply, they added, was that
Mrs. Gandhi's government has nota
accepted the Soviet line on Vieta
Nam or anything else but that her
government does feel U.S. bomb-
ing should be halted.
The feeling among Indian ex-1
perts, they went on, is that Hanoi
will not negotiate while air raids
continue and that it might be
worthwhile for the United States
to pause once again in the bomb-
ing to see if North Viet Nam reacts
differently than it has in the past.
Meanwhile, waves of U.S. jetsE
continued the air war, striking att
North Viet Nam again in the face<
of mounting Communist fire that
has felled seven U.S. planes so fart
this week.
President Johnson will pursue

the plans announced at Wednes-
day's press conference to ask the
International Red Cross Commit-
tee to arbitrate in the dispute over
captured U.S. airmen set to bel
tried by the North Vietnamese as
"war criminals.'.'
In what it described as a book-
keeping maneuver, the Pentagon
reclassified as captured 20 Navy
airmen previously listed as miss-
ing. This increased to 63 the num-
ber of Americans officially listed
Ias captured.

Wilson's New

EAST-WEST CONFRONTATION:
'Russia Avoiding Southecast Asia

GUARD',
National Guardsmen and Clevela
riot-wracke
CLOSE TO TARGI
IAstrontan
CAPE KENNEDY, Fla. (P) -
Gemini 10 astronauts John W.
Young and Michael Collins came
back to earth yesterday, para-
chuting to a watery landing in the
western Atlantic Ocean within
sight of the helicopter carrier
Guadalcanal.
Millions of persons watched on
national television as Gemini 10
floated down under a red and
white 83-foot parachute.
The first rough estimate was
that the astronauts splashed down
between four and five miles from
the carrier.
The landing about 550 miles eas-
southeast of Cape Kennedy cli-
maxed a three-day double ren-
dezvous and space walk mission.
Gemini 10 circled the globe 43
times and traveled nearly 1,200,000
miles at 17,500 miles an hour.
DAILY OFFICI

Wage Policy
Stirs Unions
'Spending Squeeze'
Successful, Rallies I
Value of Pound
LONDON (MP)-Prime Minister
Harold Wilson's tight spending
squeeze rallied the pound yester-
day but his projected wage freeze
stirred union leaders into open
revolt.
In the early hours of the morn-
ing Wilson dramatically staved off
a grave split in his Labor govern-
ment by persuading Deputy Prime
Minister George Brown to with-
draw his twice-offered resignation.
Brown thought more government
spending, not less, was the way out
of the economic crisis.
But it was clear that on two
-Associated Press crucial sectors Wilson faced a
make-or-break struggle to achieve
the objectives of the nearly $2-
and policemen (white helmets) teamed up in a jeep patrol of the billion cutback in Britain's spend-
d Hough area on Cleveland's east side last night.ing -On the world's money markets
the flight from the pound sterling
-T was reversed. But bankers and gov-
ernments have yet to display full
confidence in Britain's ability to
1)1 right its economy. An up-and-
t t, Parachute nack~ down day ended with the rate for
the pound at $2.79 1-16. This
represented a gain of 13-32 of a
Gemini 10 missed the point at i spacecraft sped into a communi- cent since Wilson's austerity meas-
which it was aiming by about 4.5 cations blackout lasting four or ures were announced Wednesday.
miles. five minutes. The blackout oc- The pound still has a sizeable
Within minutes helicopters were curred at an altitude of about 20 fraction to climb reaching official
over the bobbing capsule, and miles during the hottest part of parity at $2.80. In international
frogmen dropped into the water. re-entry when an electrified cur- monetary terms, involving dealings
A hovering helicopter reported tain enveloped the capsule. in millions of dollars, the jump
the capsule was floating very well Before the spacecraft entered was significant but not spectacu-
in two- to three-foot waves. the blackout, the astronauts re- lar.
The record for a landing was ported everything was fine on The late gain in the pound rate
made by Gemini 9 last June 6. board. Ground stations said the after several fluctuations was at-
It landed only 3.5 miles from its re-entry was progressing smoothly. tributed mainly to buying from
carrier and about half a mile from Gemini 10 rolled up a bundle New York. Dealers figured the
the aiming point. The pilots were of records valuable to the United erican authorities we pbuyers
Air Force Lt. Col. Thomas P. States' future exploration of space, viding support.
Stafford and Air Force Maj. Eu- including hopes of rocketing men viing support
gene A. Cernan. to the moon by 1969. On the workers front, leaders of
The swimme attached a o The most spectacular was Col- ting the pace, flared in protest
tation collar around the space- fins' feat as the first pilot to against Wilson's call for a six-
craft to prevent a possible sinking, venture outside his spaceship two month wage freeze to be followed
made contact with the astronauts tines. He spent nearly an houra gm estraintd
and reported they were safe. standing on his seat with all but Co
At one point in its descent, thehi gstukusdehietkg Chiefs of the Trades Union Con-
his legs stuck outside while taking gress intend to complain against
scientific photographs. The next the government deflation package
I day he left the ship completely, threatening the jobs of 500,000
A L BU LL ET IN using a space gun and lifeline workers.
The space walker became the Edward Heath's opposition Con-
first man to venture over to a servatives pressed on with plans to
Birthday Party"; Lydia Mendelssohn captured satellite and touch it. censure the Wilson government's
Theatre, 8 p.m. He retrived an experiment pack- handling of the economic crisis in
age that had collected vital in- a two-day Commons debate next
School of Music Degree Recital-Rob- formation on micrometeorites. week.
ert Chauls, pianist: Recital Hall, School
of Music, 8:30 p.m.

By The Associated Press
An observer, known to be close
to high Soviet figures, pictures
the Kremlin leaders as looking
unhappily forward to the time
when they may be forced to inter-
vene more vigorously in Southeast
Asia on behalf of the North Viet-
namese regime, despite the peril
of an extremely serious world cris-
is.
The correspondent speculates
that should captive United States
pilots be tried as war criminals, it
might provoke U.S. retaliation,
possibly in the form of a punitive
invasion. He implies that Moscow
now is saying it is up to the Unit-
ed States-alone-whether a ter-
ribly dangerous war crisis comes
to a head.
No Controls
The Soviet government tries to
push the idea that it cannot ad-
vise Hanoi what to do with respect
to the war crimes threat.
But Hanoi probably is aware of
the concern. It has an escape
hatch if it chooses to use it, and
can edge away from the threat.
For example, there have been
mass public rallies in Hanoi and
Haiphong in the past few days to
support the war effort.rAt none
'of these did speakers or slogans
mention the captive pilots or the
threatened trials. It would seem
logical that such rallies would be
used to lay propaganda ground-
work if such trials were in the
offing.
The war crimes issue, in fact,
seems directly related to a major
impasse blocking the path to peace
talks.
By making the threat, the Hanoi
government brings to the world's
attention the contention that U.S.
air raids on North Viet Nam
violate international law.
Publicly, Hanoi gives the /im-
pression in its propoganda that it
will not retreat from its all-or-
nothing stand that all Ameri-

cans must leave South Viet Nam
before there can be apy talk of
peace.
Switch in Emphasis
In private, there seems to be a
difference in emphasis. Hanoi has
told various peace-seeking' diplo-a
mats it will not consider an ap-
proach to a conference table un-
less the United States stops bomb-
ing North Viet Nam-uncondition-
ally, without any demand for con-
cessions from Hanoi.
A suggestion that this was a
primary source of deadlock ap-
peared in a statement by Cana-
dian Foreign Secretary Paul Mar-
tin, reporting on a peace mission
to Hanoi by special envoy Chester
Ronning.
Martin saw a relation between
the bombing issue and "whatever
moves it may be possible to make
toward an eventual settlement."
The U.S. position is that the bomb-
ing of North Viet Nam will stop if
Hanoi halts dispatch of its troops
and other direct aid to the Viet
Cong.
Somewhere, here, from all the
confusion and debate whirling
about the threat to try the U.S.
pilots, may be the beginning of a
new phase in the search for peace.
There have been indications all
along that Ho Chi Minh's regime
had been listening to various peace
missionaries.
Chinese Influence
Communist China remains a
brake on the peace machinery. It
persistently calls any move toward
talks a plot by Americans and
Russians. Its hammering, indeed,
has so affected Moscow, apparent-
ly, as to give Peking a measure of
influence over Soviet decisions.

On the surface, Hanoi, too, could
influence Moscow decisions. It
holds a potent weapon in the
threat of the war crimes trial.
Should North Viet Nam go through
with this, chances for peace ap-
proaches could be wrecked for a
long time, and a far more serious
world situation likely would devel-
op.
Hanoi's handling of the issue,
however, does have some marks of
an international propaganda show
to dramatize its position. Propa-
ganda already has pictured U.S.
captives as humbly penitent.
Statements attributed to the cap-
tive pilots are so full of Commu-
nist cliches that they suggest
authorship by the Communists
themselves.
If it chooses, Hanoi already has
the way opened for a planned re-
treat from the war crimes issue.
The captive pilots then would ap-
pear, in the long run, to have been
pawns in a campaign to draw
world attention to Hanoi's posi-
tion on peacee talks and perhaps
direct pressure on the United
States to make a conciliatory
move.
"We are the offspring of God."
--Act 17:29
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

Ecumenical Campus Ministry
presents
DINNER FILM SERIES
CITIZEN KANE
$1.25
Call 662-3580 for reservations
6:30, Friday 22nd
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenow

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
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publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, JULY 22
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-'FHow to Develop and Manage
an Effective wage and Salary Program"
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
National Band Conductors Conference
Concert - Frank Stachow, clarinetist,
Lebanon Valley College, Pennsylvania:
Recital Hail, School of Music, 9 and
11 a.m.

L

Dept. of Astronomy Visitors' Night-
Jerry R. Ehman, Dept. of Astronomy,
"Planetary Nebulae, or Smoke Rings in
the Sky," to observe the Moon: Aud.
D, Angell Hall, 9 p.m.
Events Saturday
Cinema Guild-"Key Largo": Archi-
tecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Dept, of Speech University Players
Performance - Harold Pinter's "The
Birthday Party": Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre, 8 p.m.
General Notices
Student Accounts: Your attention is
calledto the rollowing rules passed by
the Regents at their meeting on Feb
28, 1936: Students shall pay all accounts

~~77
t Ip *eI

tContinued on Page 4i
National Band Conductors Conference
Concert-University Summer Session
Band: Rehearsal Hall, School of Music, John Chpman of the

Em mmmmmmmm mmmmm.m mmmmm.mmmm.mm mmmmmmmmm
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR
f f
JOH N H USTON
f r
f I
T B
* f
f f
r ~Starring
* Ia
HUMPHREY BOGART, LAUREN BACALL,
I* EDWARD G. ROBINSON, CLAIRE TREVOR
(Academy Award), Lionel Barrymore, Thomas Gomez.
* SHORT:-;
"HELP! MY SNOWMAN'S BURNING DOWN!
(Color) Many Awards
f 1
f IT9I D
f f
S IaN TEa ARCHITECTUa AUDTORaUM
A DM ISS ION: F PIFTY C ENTS
* U
~mmmm. mm. m. mmmmmmmmmmm mmmmmmmmmm. mmmmmmmmmmm

Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-"India and Her Food Prob-
lem," "The Squeeze," and "Popula-
tion Econogy": Multipurpose Room, Un-
dergraduate Library, 1:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-"Key Largo": Archi-
tecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Performance - Harold Pinter's "The

"N.Y. Daily News" called
A THURBER
CARNIVAL
"A magnificently
lunatic festival !"

THE MIKSCH CODRRION s
SBLAKE EDWARDS WHATI YOU DO IN THE WAR, DADDY?"
COLORBYDELUXE DIAL

fJ1;Jwg;[c"j;L3

5-6290

v

....mm

i

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Dept. of Speech)
present

Lose Something?
Find it with a
Daily Classified
Phone 482-2056
O ene:00NwCARPETERROM
Open 7:00-Now Showing

(j~ n
Q, Irr
Zill Ir4

Moliere's
Delightful Farce
THE
RELUCTANT
DOCTOR

4k4.
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AToH DumbetDimwits In Par.s
R$sul' the Ha" 'ei't'i *History
r r j ARTIE1SHAW In a Dlizy Display of Dippim s...
11 ii A
XNoy0WO ROB
4j A DEPARTMENT STORE
A Pierre Grimblat Film
JEAN.CLAUDE BRIALY * MARIE LAFORET
SOPHIE DAUMIER * JEAN-PIERRE MARIELLE
Sem-sUfla MAA
""F X Now at the lIYO tbW
* George Wein Presents
~FESTIVAL ENCDRE*
Detroit's Greatest JAZZ Concert I
Sunday, Aug.7-Cobo Arena-8 p.m.
Sarah Vaughn 9 Dave Brubeck WrtI
SMiles-Davis Ont. *Horace Silver Ont.;

I

11

Presents

......

GRANT

JOHANNESEN

4:00 P.M. July 28th and 29th
TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM (U of M Frieze Bldg.)
Send Check and Order Form below to Children's
Theatre, Dept. of Speech, Univ. of Mich., Ann Arbor
THE RELUCTANT DOCTOR
I enclose $- for
Children's tickets (50c)
Adult tickets ($1.00)
Performance: ._ Thursday Friday

i

Renowned

Concert Pianist and Recording

Artist

Monday, July 25, 8:30
in RACKHAM AUDITORIUM
(appearing in Summer Concert Series)
PROGRAM:

I

I

f!

Sonata No. 3 in B-flat.

Hindemith

,

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