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June 30, 1966 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1966-06-30

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JUNE 30., 1966

PAGE TWO THi~ MICIHGAN DAILY THURSDAY, JUNE 30, 1966

TIGHTER MILITARY CONTROL:

Argentina's President Calls for
Economic, Poitical Revamping,

Poverty, Pessimism
Plague Indonesians

STUDENT BOOK ,SRVICC
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STUDENT BOOK SGRVICG

By The Associated Press
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -
Lt. Gen. Juan Carlos Ongania
was sworn in as president of Ar-
gentina's new revolutionary regime
yesterday amid indications he
plans long years of severe mili-
tary rule to lessen the influence
of Peronist forces.
Ongania, 52, was granted almost
absolute power by the three-man
military junta who chose him for
the post after ousting President
Arturo Illia in a bloodless coup
Tuesday.
Receiving the presidential sash
and baton from junta members in
ceremonies in Government House,
the cavalry general swore to up-
hold "the statute of the revolu-
tion and the constitution."
The statute of the revolution
gives the new president complete

legislative powers, allowing him
to make new laws or repeal old
ones at will. It also provides that
the constitution will be observed
as long as it does not conflict with
revolutionary aims.
Sources close to the government
said the military plan to rule for
possibly eight to 10 years, while
drastically reshaping Argentina's
economic and political structure.
The military complained that
Illia failed to act effectively
against the nation's many eco-
nomic problems, including infla-
tion.
The junta said it plans sweeping
economic, political and social re-
forms aimed at wooing Argentines
away from Peronism.
All Parties Out
The revolutionary regime al-
ready has dissolved all political

parties in an effort to curb the
growing power of followers of ex-
dictator Juan D. Peron, who was
overthrown and sent into exile by
the military in 1955.
Military grievance at Illia's
failure to reduce the strength of
the Peronists was a major cause of
the coup. The Peronists won con-
trol of three of the country's 22
provinces in recent elections and
probably would havewon Buenos
AireshProvince in elections next
March.
The fear of renewed power for
the forces Peron left behind is
rooted in memories of his nine-
year dictatorship and the hold
his movement still has on Argen-
tina's workers. The Peronists con-
trol around three million votes
in a voting population of 12 mil-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

lion, including most of the trade
unions.
The military would prefer no
Peronist candidate ever gets on
any ballot. But so long as that
ballot is in a remote and lightly
populated province-such as Neu-
quen, Chaco or Jujuy-the mili-
tary generally rolls with the
punch. The Peronists control those
three provinces.
But when the Peronists show
signs they can take Buenos Aires
Province, the military tightens
control. In provincial elections in
1965, it became evident that unless
President Arturo Illia's govern-
ment acquired more strength from
some place, the Peronists were
sure to take over the capital pro-
vince in the provincial elections
next March.
Buenos Aires Province not only
has one third of Argentina's popu-
lation. It has a great deal of the
industry-and a 25,000-man pro-
vincial police force with guns, tear
gas and trucks.
The military is much like the
heart-lung machine in open heart
surgery.
Military Control
As long as the machine isn't
turned on, the civilian legislative,
executive and judicial heart of
Argentina pumps along. Let the
military turn on the rebellion
machine, and the heart is bypass-
ed. The military takes over.
As long as the military has
the guns, its leaders say privately,1
Peronists never will have a chance
to take power again. But, since
Peronism's appeal comes from the
benefits he gave the descamisados,
Argentina's "shirtless ones," and
since there still are more backs
than shirts, the prospects is for
more clicks of the revolt trigger.
In Madrid, where Peron has
lived since 1960, a close associate
said it probably would take "a
lot of persuasion to get Peron to
go back to Argentina, even if the
door was wide open,

JAKARTA, Indonesia (/)-"In-
donesia may improve itself - by
the year 2000," the retired govern-
ment official said. Then his voice
trailed off and he stared moodily
at the wall.
His depression summed up the
widespread pessimism in Indone-
sia, a nation incredibly rich in
natural resources but still des-
perately poor.
Despite its poverty, and the an-
nual gloomy reports by Western
analysts that Indonesia is on the
brink of economic collapse, Indo-
nesia will keep going.
Contrasts
It is a nation of contrasts, a na-
tion where millions of its people
are without shoes and only rags
to wear, but a nation where oil
simply runs out of the ground. It
is a nation where rubber trees
sprout where seeds drop, where
rice fields swirl in emerald rivers
across the volcanic land.
But since Indonesia declared its
independence from Dutch colon-
ial rule in 1945, it has made little
headway in building a stable
economy. In cold figures, Indo-
nesia owes $2.4 billion in foreign
debts. The interest rate alone
comes to about $470 million each
year, equal to Indonesia's esti-
mated export earnings for this
year,
But the poverty of this rich
land can better be seen in the
people who struggle with it. In
Solo, a major city in central Java,
women work 15 hours a day sit-
ting on a dirt floor making batik,
the impregnated cloth for which
Indonesia is famous. They earn
seven rupiahs a day, the equiva-
lent of seven cents or less on open
market exchange rates.
Inflation a 'Leech'
Inflation is a constant leech.
The cost of living rose 600 per
cent in 1963 and still is going up.
HoW Indonesians survived the
increase, with no salary raise, re-
mains a mystery even to eco-
nomic experts here. The most ap-
parent answer, as one Indonesian
put it, was "we just ate less."
Failure in Indonesia's economy
lies within the complex and vague
plans periodically set forth by the
government. Overseeing it all, un-

til the most recent government
shakeup in March, was President
Sukarno.
No small part of the blame for
economic failures here must lie
with him,
Eight-Year Plan Failure
Indonesia is now in the final
two years of its eight-year plan,
which President Sukarno once
described as "rich in fantasy." Its
practicality, however, is difficult
to discern.
Failures in Indonesia's economy
can be traced to Dutch colonial
rule. In the 300 years the Dutch
ruled these islands, they did al-
most nothing to build a founda-
tion for an Indonesian-run econ-
omy, Yet Indonesia, directly or in-
directly, provided income for one
in every seven Dutchmen.
The Dutch installed a dual
economy, one for hard cash in
export-import dealings run by the
Dutch. The second was a village
level program that was geared to
the existence level only. Chinese
here were used as middlemen be-
tween the Dutch and the Indo-
nesians, to the profit of the Chi-
nese,
But despite this, the failures
over the past 20 years are diffi-
cult to explain away, even by In-
donesian government officials.
Much of the blame is laid simply
on the lack of practically fore-
sight.
One noted author on Indonesia
commented "Like the Russian gen-
eral who didn't like war because
it destroyed disciplines in the
army, Indonesian leadership has
tended to treat serious economic
reform as if its purpose were to
destroy the harmony of the peo-

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THURSDAY, JUNE 30
Day Calendar
Department of Speech University
Players Performance - William Shak-
espeare's A Winter's Tale: Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. 8 p.m.
For further Information, please cal
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
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Audio-Visual Education Center Film
Preview-1898: Multipurpose Room, Un-
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General Notices
Regents' Meeting: July 29. Communi-
cations for consideration at this meet-
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not later than Thursday, July 14.
Persons interested in ushering for the
summer Piano Concert Series, in Rack-
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who signed for this service during the
May Festival please call Mr. Warner,
NO 8-8597.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offi-
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organizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 Student Activities Build-
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B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, mixer,
Thursday, June 30, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
. . .
Christian Science Organization, tes-
timony meeting, Thursday, June 30.
7:30 p.m., 3545 SAB.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), folk dance
with instruction, open to everyone, Fri-
day, June 30, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.
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Doctoral Examination for: David
Stanley Lenfest, English Language &
Literature; thesis: "The Illustrations
of Gulliver's Travels, 1727-1838, Con-
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Friday, July 1, Room 2601 Haven Hall,
at 3 p.m. Chairman: A. W. Allison.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Detroit Public Schools, Detroit-Jr.
Admin. Ass't. BA, bkgd. in bus, ad.,
econ, test and measurements, statis-
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in recruiting, selecting and placing per-
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Photo Marketing Magazine, Jackson,
Mich.-Assoc. Editor for trade publica-
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Engl. or Journ. Some expr. desirable.1
Knowl. of layout.
Barber-Colman Co., Rockford, Ill.-
Elect. Engr. BSEE, 2-5 yrs. exper. Dev.
electronic circuits for indust. measure-
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instrument engr. Dev. electronic and
electro-mech. Indust. process control
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Milwaukee County Civil Service
Comm., Wis.-Landscape Arch. Degree
in Land. Arch., Des. or Mgmt. 1 yr.
exper. in land arch, desirable Plan
and des. land. ,dev. for recreational
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etc. Applic. deadline Aug. 4.
Devereux Foundation, Devon, Penn.-
Rehabilitation Counselors. Vocational
rehab. program for mentally retarded
and emotionally disabled young people.
MA in rehab. or rel. counseling. Exper.

helpful. Also traineeships-BA and some
exper. rel. to counseling.
William Austin Interior Design,
Grosse Pte., Mich.-Assistant for small
interior des. co. Immed. opening for
man with degree in Interior Des. Exper.
not req. with good trng. Under 30
yrs. old.
Fisher Body Craftsman's Guild, War-
ren, Mich.-Field Repres. to make pres-
entations to Jr. and Sr. High School
assemblies. Single men, degrees in Gen.
Lib. Arts or Bus. Ad. Employment be-
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further opportunity with Fisher Body
or G.M. in Publ. Rel. or other area.
American Can Co., Barrington, Ill.-
Indust. Designer BS Indust. Des. Up to
5 yrs, exper. in des, work on consumer
products. Dev new pkg. concepts, etc.
FMC Corp., Lansing, Mich.-Product
Engr. with mfr, or auto, service equip.
BSME with some exper. Layout and
dev. new mech. products, responsible1
for prod. specs.
Ayerst Labs, Inc., Rouses Point, N.Y.
-Various openings including 1. Chem-
1st, BS Pharm. 0-3 yrs. exper. 2. Jr.
Engr., BS Ch.E. or ME plus 2-3 yrs.
exper. 3. Chemist, BS Chem., exper. in
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Ass't. in Acctg., BBA acctg. major. 2-5
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science bkgd. or BS Chem. pharm. or
rel. and aptitude for or exper. in lib.1
work. 6. Technician, BS in science, 2
yrs. chem. req. 7. Field Repres.. BS
Science pref. Exper. in animal hus-
bandry desirable.
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For further info., please call 764-7460
General Div., Bureau of Appoints 3200
SAB.
PH, 483-4680
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STARTING TODAY
"Paradise Hawaiian
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PRESENTATIONS
'He TIhI1ird Annual
SUMMER CONCERT SERIES
Four Piano Recitals in tRackhaun Auditorium
ALFRED BRENDEL . . . . . . . July 6, 8:30
Duport Variations, K.573................... ...............M ozart
Sonata in A minor, K. 310..............................Mozart
Symphonic Studies, Op. 13.............................Schumann
Hungarian Rhapsody, No. 3..................................Liszt
Bagatelle without tonality ................... ............ ..Liszt
Pensees des Mortz............................,............Liszt
Toccata ..... . ....... ................................Busani
PETER SERKIN . ....... . July 14, 8:30
Sonata in E major, Ap. 14, No. 1.........................Beethoven
Sonata in G major, Op. 14, No. 2........ ..............Beethoven
Sonata in E major, Op. 100..........................Beethoven
Sinfonien (3-part Inventions)................................Bach
EVELYN CROCHET ... . . .. July 20, 8:30
'Fantasy and Fugue in A minor..............................Bach
Three Pieces, Op. 11.................................Schoenberg
Sonata in D mujor, K. 311................................Mozart
Three Pieces, Op. posthumous....... ... .............Schubert
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