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June 10, 1966 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1966-06-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1966

PAGE TWO TIlL MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, JUNE 10, 1966

HOW MANY USERS?

Marijuana, LSD Hip for College In-Group

FILMS
Two French Rival Boys Gangs
Clash in 'War of the Buttons'

(Continued from Page 1)
their bodies oozing into the en-
vironment and conclude they are
going out of their heads. The ef-
fect of a minimal dose lasts 10
to 14 hours. It is nonaddicting.
'The other hallucinogens are
mescaline, which is nade from a
cactus plant, and psilocybin, which
comes from the sacred mushroom.
They are milder than LSD but
more potent than marijuana.
Campul pill-taking can be a
group activity among a certain
element, but to a large degree it
is a solitary undertaking. A stu-
dent may take amphetamines-
pep pills which are commonly
called bennies, dexies or uppies-
before a big test or in order to
stay awake and do some crash
studying.
Goof Balls Habit Forming
If pep pills can make one jit-
tery and high, the goof balls or
barbiturates can bring them down.
These are depressants. Like pep
pills, they are swallowed. They
are nonaddicting, but habit form-
ing and some experts say the
heavy user who is shut off from
his supply may experience a with-
drawal syndrome similar to that
of a heroin addict.
Whatever the drug of choice, it
is rare-according to most sources
-to find the class narcotic addict
on campus. The hero-in Junkie-
just isn't to be found. Collegians
consider such drug use very, veryj
square and unhip.
"Narcotics turn you of f," says
a University of Chicago student.
"That's the scene for social drop-
outs, the kids who can't really
make it in the world. I turn on
with pot because it opens me up.
Hey, you know that da-da-da-
duumm in Beethoven's Fifth Sym-
phony? You should hear that
duumm when you are high on
pot. It hangs there forever, right
in the air somewhere."
'Didl It for Thrills'
A young lady from a Western
college who left school to become
an airlines stewardess says, "The
girls in my sorority who smoked
marijuana did it because of their
dates, but once in a very great
while we'd do it in the sorority
house. It would start as a joke,
but I guess we really wanted to do
it. I guess we did it for thrills."
Students in the creative arts
express keen interest in LSD on
*1

the notion that it may turn some
key that will let them flower.
Says a poet-student: "The evi-
dence is that LSD opens you to
depths of perception and aware-
ness you are never conscious of
in an ordinary state. Why should
I deny myself the opportunity of
using a safe drug to expand my
awareness and feeling?"
Special Language
Students at different colleges
have developed an "in" language
that is more than just being hip.
There are modes of communica-
tion so that the in group on any
particular campus will almost al-
ways know whether there is a
supply of marijuana or acid, as
LSD is called on some campuses.
Or, the word goes out rapidly if
there is danger from campus po-
lice, federal agents, municipal
police or faculty.
How does a student manage to
get LSD, marijuana or any other
drug?
LSD has been banned but sup-
plies are reliably believed to be
coming from Italy, as well as a few
other countries. It requires only
1-10,000th of a gram to produce
an effect lasting 10 to 14 hours.
An ounce would provide nearly
300,000 doses. It is most commonly
sold absorbed into a sugar cube,
at from $3 to $5 a cube. Quite of-
ten, the student who has some may
pass it along to others without
charge. It reportedly can be made
easily from its two components,
lysergic acid and diethylamide,
and supposedly almost any high
school chemistry student could
accomplish the feat.
Marijuana Readily Available
Despite decades of prohibitive
laws on marijuana, quantities ap-
parently move freely throughout
the country. The plant can be
grown in a window box. The best
quality marijuana comes from
Mexico. Engough to roil 10 joints
may cost $5.
In Texas, peyote is legal and ob-
taining peyote buttons, which are
chewed, is not difficult. A supply
of several pounds, for example,
was mailed to some students at
an Eastern university not too long
ago.
The amphetamines-"speed" is
the current hippie term-and bar-
biturates, which are called goof
balls, or downies, exist in such
abundance that the source could
be just about any friendly medi-
cine cabinet.
Three Groups of Users
Students who may turn to drugs
are generally put into one of three
groups-the casually curious, who
take a taste and quit; the thrill-
seekers, who will try anything that
the in group makes important, and
the in group or committed, an
element that might not simply
take LSD but has to surround it
with a mystical quality that would
include knowledge of the Tibetan
Book of the Dead.
What is the harm, if any, to
the user of psychedelics?
FOLLETT'S
Wishes luck to
al Indians in
the UAC
CANOE RACE

"LSD apparently interferes with
reality testing and perceptual]
functions," says Dr. Ernest Wolff,
chief psychiatrist for student1
health services at Northwestern;
University. "This accounts for the1
quasi-hallucinatory effects and a
psychological regression to the
state where one does not clearly
differentiate between himself and
his environment. LSD users com-
monly describe seeing themselves
from afar or of feeling that the
things around them are an exten-
sion of themselves. This is what
happens in the infant world."
Nightmare World
Says Dr. Dana L. Farnsworth,
head of Harvard's psychiatric
services, "In our files is the re-
port of a student who took one
of the drugs and spent a whole
day living the nightmare that he
was only 6 inches tall.
In our own experience, several
students have had to be hospital-
ized for long periods following
ingestion of small amounts of
drugs."
A professor at Fairleigh-Dick-
inson in New Jersey says "despite
all the alleged benefits of the psy-
chedelics, students who use them
begin to deteriorate as far as
classroom work goes. Frankly, I
know of only a few cases of such
drug use here. I think abuse of
the amphetamines and barbitur-
ates is much more extensive. I've
had them come to class on Mon-
day morning with their pupils so
dilated they looked like sun-
glasses."
The innocence attributed to
marijuana use, according to Dr.
Becker, is best illustrated by the
fact that so many students are so
easily caught at it-actually only
small fractions of the student
populations have been involved in
such arrests.
Ideological Defiancej
"For them to hide or to take
elaborte precautions about its use
would be degrading, hypocritical,"
says Dr. Becker. "They do not
even take the standard pot head
precautions against detection and
arrest. It is a kind of ideological
defiance. It is all of a piece with
the growing tendency of deviant
groups to stand up and say, "Leave
us alone."
At a Berkeley apartment shared
by several students, the walls
seemed permeated with the some-
what acrid odor of marijuana
smoke. They were turning on with
pot, and one-a youth with blond1
wavy hair, neatly dressed in a
striped shirt and brown unpleated
trousers-said he had first smoked
marijuana in high school.
"I'm from Marin County and I
hardly know anyone who went to
high school who didn't least try
pot," he said. "I turn on more
here than I used to in high school,
but maybe that's because more
of It is available."
Hippies Are A Students
How have such drug users per-
formed in classrooms? What sort
of grades do they maintain?
"I'd say the hippies in my class

are the A students," says a San
Francisco State instructor.
"Do they get such good grades
because they are heads?" he was'
asked. "No. They get the grades
because they are smarter. They are
intellectually superior and highly
moral."
Dr. Harvey Powelson, a psy-
chiatrist with the student health
services at Berkeley, says he has
no count of known users, but on
examining his caseload he found
that some four out of six students
had experience with LSD or mari-
juana.
"The ones who come to the psy-
chiatric clinic have a B average,
which I might point out is quite
good," says Dr. Powelson, "because
the University of California at-
tracts the top 15 per cent of the
students in the state. Half of the
Woodrow Wilson fellowships in the
United States come here. They
are the cream of the intellectual
community.
Instant Fantasy
"As to their motives for using
LSD or marijuana, we must un-
derstand that we are dealing with
the first generation raised on TV
and everything is instant. It is
a generation that expects instant
gratification. You don't have to
read about the war in Viet Nam,
you can see it. You can leave a
hotel in San Francisco and go to
New York and register in almost
the same hotel, in a matter of
hours. It is going someplace and
still being the same place. Now,
with the LSD pill, you can pre-
sumably obtain instant fantasy."
The urban-centered schools are
confronted with the largest inci-
dence because the channels of
supply are so close. At Columbia
College in New York City, Dean
David B. Truman candidly states
that he would not be totally as-
tonished if the number of students
experimenting with drugs was as
high as one-third of the school.
There are 2,700 students in the
college.
Various student leaders and stu-
dent groups at New York Univer-
sity's downtown campus, located in
Greenwich Village, figure that as
many as one out of five students
have experimented with marijuana
or LSD. Last year, three student
organizations were suspended for
sponsoring an enormous pot bash.
Not Avoiding Facts
Reaching figures is not easy
by any means, and sometimes im-
possible. Even so, some school ad-
ministrators are not trying to
sweep things under the rug.
"It's there, we have the pat-
tern," says Staton R. Curtis, dean
of students at Boston University.
Why should the campus be con-
fronted with such a problem?
For one thing, much of the
early research on LSD in the U.S.
was conducted through university-
connected facilities. When tests
moved out of the area of the
laboratory-hospitals, institution,
and prisons were largely first used
in experiments-to the somewhat
more amiable atmosphere of the

campus, there were reports of
pleasant or exciting experiences.
The student populations of most
sophisticated schools were aware
of LSD and mescaline and psilo-
cybin long before the rest of the'
population caught up.
What's Awful About It?
"I don't honestly see what is so
awful about it," says a University
of Chicago student. "I haven't per-
sonally tried LSD and I don't

f,

By ANDREW LUGG
When film theorists talk of
translating novels into films, they
usually make one stipulation,
namely, that the novel be cine-
matic. By and large this means
that it must have a great deal of
action.
However, this is not the whole

I .. . 0 T ..1 ..L T i .

know i Iwill but I nave smoked problem. Consider two examples-
pot a few times. I've been curious Peter Brook's "The Lord of the
about it, but I've also been curious Flies" and Yves Robert's "The.
about unidentified flying objects, War of the Buttons," which is
the God-is-dead controversy, auto- showing through Saturday at the
mobile safety and French and Campus Theatre.
American wives. If I can't try to B
find out about things here, when Both these films are adaptations
and where am I going to do it?" from novels, and both deal with
There has been some agitation children and the way they inter-
on campuses against laws making athe adult world-school, home, etc.
a 'sWhereas Brooks film is stiff
Regarding this, Harvard's Dr. and committed to an "adult"'idea,
Farnsworth says: namely, that we are not far from
"Support for this promotion is being savages, "The War of the
being to develop in college facul- Buttons" is freewheeling and un-
ties, in the ranks of the ministry pretentious. There is no moraliz-
and even among physicians. It is ing here (except in the very last
no wonder that numbers of our scene, which I refer to later). Yves
young people are beginning to pay Robert seems to have a feel for
attention to the siren song of his subject; Brook does not.
consciousness expansion'." I am suggesting that it is the
Middle-Class Users director's approach that is all im-
The families whose children be- portant, not the script. After all,
come involved seem in many in- a script by its very nature is un-
stances-on the basis of students' cinematic whether it is an adapta-
own descriptions-to be. middle-
and upper middle- and upper-
class, financially, culturally and DA ILY 0 FFIC
socially. i I O F C
A Princeton student says "it
isn't unusual that most of us The Daily Official Bulletin is an
come from what are called suc- official publication of the Univer-
cessful families. It costs money sity of Michigan for which The
to go to any decent school, no Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
matter how small, so you'd expect tal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
that a reasonable percentage of Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
the parents have made it. My fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
father is a corporation counsel fub aturday andbySundy. General
and my mother is active in civic Notices may be published a maxi-
and social things. mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
"We really don't know much Studentrorganization notices are not
about marijuana or LSD from our accepted for publication.
family life. We know about drink- FRIDAY, JUNE 10
ing because I've always seen
people drinking in a social situa-
tion and I had my first drink in ORG AINIZA ION
my own home. I think I know NOTICES
more agout the dangers of drink-
ing because of what I've seen or
know about happening in my own USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
hometown." NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
Is this dabbling with drugs a ganizations only. Forms are available In
tell-tale sign that the college gen- Room 1011 SAB.
eration is going to be lost to B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Sab-
reality? How does one assess the bath service, "Prof. Mordecai M. Kap-
generation? lan: An Appraisal," Fri., June 10, 7:15
genert~on p.m., Present Chapel, 1429 Bill St.
"I do not despair for this college . C 2
generation," says Northwestern's Baha'i Student Group, Race unity
Dr. Wolff. "They are more intel- day picnic, Sun., June 12, 1 p.m., Is-
morealet, hiningland Park. N cost-please call 668-9085
ligent, more alert, thinking more, between 6 and 8 p.m.
doing more, and are probably * * *
physically healthier than any Folk Dance Ciub (WAA),tFolk dance
physicaly twith instruction, open to everyone,
other generation in our history." Fri., June 10, 8-11 p.m.. Barbour Gym.

tion from a novel or an original
film-script.
"The War of the Buttons" is a
tale of two rival gangs of young
boys from neighboring villages,
Velrans and Longevernes. The
confrontation between the gangs
begins with name-calling, the
groups resolving themselves into
the "soggy balls" and the "ass
scratchers."
Lebrac, the self-styled leader of
the Longevernes, soon initiates the
war of the buttons, in which cap-
tives are stripped of all the but-
tons on their clothes-"to take a
man's honor" says Lebrac. The
action becomes wilder-nude raids
and so on.
Two fine characters emerge in
the film - Tigibus, the youngest
comedian yet who has the wildest
and dirtiest ideas of all, and a
benign schoolteacher who vacil-
lates between the boys' world and
that of the parents.
The film ends with both Lebrac
and the leader of the Velrans in
a childrens' home. The moral,
hammered out during the film,
is unnecesarily given again. We
didn't need this.
The humor is extraordinary.
And note, French kids really do
act like this. (Perhaps this was
one of Brook's problems-having
IAL BULLETIN
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild-"Sherlock Jr."' and
"The Pilgrim": Architecture Aud., 7
and 9 p.m.
Dept. of Political Science Lecture -
Quincy Wright, "The Study of War
Revisited": west Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg., 4 p.m.
General Notices
French and German Objective Test:
The Objective Test in French and Ger-
man administered by the Graduate,
School for doctoral candidates is sched-
uled for Thurs. afternoon, July 7,
from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Natural Sci-
ence Aud. ALL students planning to
take the objective test must register
by July 6 at the Reception Desk of
the Graduate School Office in the
Rackham Bldg.
(Continued on Page 5)
The DISC SHOP
Wishes luck to
Tribesmen in
UAC's Friday
DANCE CONTEST

to deal with stuffy English "pub-
lic" school boys.) Lebrac's speech
on "fraternite, egalite, et liberte"
and the scene in which the delin-
quent parents of the two villages
fight are, to say the least, high-
lights in any cinema.
That "War of the Buttons"
should win the "Jean Vigo Prize"
is a great tribute to the film.
Vigo was the finest director of
children in anarchy. Since "War
of the Buttons" derives much from
Vigo's "Zero for Conduct," the
tribute works both ways.
Uac SUMMER UPRISING
CANOE RACE
Registration 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Tues., Wed. & Thurs.
DIAG

''

PH. 483-4680
Enraam"Ow CARPENTER RMA
NOW SHOWING
Shown at 10:30 Only
- ALSO -
RUSS TAMBLYN
KIERON MOORE

I-tJ11
Shown at 8:25 & 12:05
PLUS
"SOUND OF SPEED"
IN COLOR-SEE and THRILL TO
2 COLOR CARTOONS

..._

Read
Daily
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-- - -------

I -

DIAL
2-6264
THEY STUNNED THE WORLD WITH THEIR INCREDIBLE VICTORY!
Ku DOUGLAS
SENTA BRGE
Guest appearances; Frank Sinatra, Yu! Bruner, John Wayne

_ i

I

...

'dom

DIAL 8-6416
TONIGHT AT 7 & 9 P.M.

PEOPLE WHO LAUGH...
(at people cutting
buttons off people...)
WON'T BLUSH!...
(at"words that are
still startling!...
and fun it is!"
-NY Times)

I

1

I

M- G

DIAL 5-6290

41

SUNDAY: "EYE OF THE NEEDLE"
wawramww:m wwmmaswwmminin wiwmmanm mma Um mmammaasw = m=iw=rnm
TONIGHT
I r
FOCUS-=THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR ;
r /
BUSTER KEATON
( 1924) /
SHERL CK JR.
" r
Sand
I/
CH ARLIECA PLIN
THE PILGRIM
/ r

I

DETROIT FREE PRESS
says
"One of the
best movies
you'll be seeing
this year!"
(June 8, 1966)

One of the greatestworks in tie dramatic literature ofwestern civilization,THE ORESTEIA
gave tragedy its vocabulary of values. A chilling trilogy of plays of mounting hor-
ror and fascination, it introduces the theatre's greatest tragic heroine-Clytemnestra.
JUDITH ANDERSON
IN AESCHYLUS'
THE ORESTEIA
TRANSLATED BY RICHMOND LATTIMORE

Aristophanes' timeless comic masterpiece is a delightful, satiric romp through man-
nered Athens. THE BIRDS' extravagant plot and circumstance, outrageous clowning,
and spectacular fantasy make contemporary comment to side-splitting style.

BERT LAHR
IN ARISTOPHANES'
THE BIRDS
TRANSLATED BY WILLIAM ARROWSMITH

ALEXIS SOLOMOS ArtisticDirector RICHARD KIRSCHNER Executive Director

It's on all FUN show!

]

Also Starring
DONALD DAVIS

JACQUELINE BROOKES JOHN MICHAEL KING JACK FLETCHER

I

.

You must sit in from the begin'

and it's
the
wildest

LLOYD HARRIS FREDERIC WARRINER DINA PAISNER KAREN LUDWIG RUTH VOLNER
RUBY DEE
Scenery and Festival Stage Designed by ELDON ELDER Lighting by GILBERT V. HEMSLEY, JR. costumes for The Oresteia by MR. SOLOMOS
Costumes for The Birds by MR. ELDER Choreography for The Oresteia by HELEN MCGEHEE Choreography for The Birds by GEMZE DE LAPPE
Music for The Oresteia by IANNIS XENAKIS Music for The Birds by HERMAN CHESSID
Entire Production Conceived and Directed by ALEXIS SOLOMOS

1

HENRY FONDAy
JOANNE WOODWARD 'r
InfN PRORARnflY

I I

I

%Eml I

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