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June 09, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-06-09

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JUNE 9,1966

?AGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. ITINE 9. 1QA~

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BRITAIN, CANADA, JAPAN EXCEPTIONS:
Compulsory Military Service Common
Source of Student Irritation Worldwide

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By The Associated Press
Compulsory military service in
one form of another is common-
place around the world. Britain,
Canada and Japan are among the
few nations that do not have it.
The questions of who is drafted,
who is deferred and who is exempt
are major issues in U.S. debate.
These also are issues in many
other countries. An Associated
Press survey shows these high-
lights:
InItaly, which has a long,
complex list of grounds for exemp-
tion and deferment, the son or
brother of someone killed in a,
war cannot be drafted. The oldest
or only grandson of someone with
no unmarried children also is
draft exempt, as is the oldest son
in a family of seven or more
children.
In France
France grants an exemption if a
member of the potential draftee's
family was killed in the service of
the nation.
Exemption or deferment be-
cause of service by other members
of a man's family is allowed in
several countries. In the Nether-
lands, if two sons have been draft-
ed, all others in a family are
exempt.
In Italy, if two brothers are
called up, one may ask for a delay
in his induction until the brother
has completed his service.
Only Child
A Syrian can avoid conscription1
if he is an only child.
One of the toughest draft laws
is in Iraq, which has been waging
a costly antiguerrilla war against
Kurdish tribesmen in its northern
provinces for several years. Iraq's
emergency regulations, passed in
March, require service of anyone
18-50 who has not been in the
armed forces before, including stu-

dents. Deferments are granted
only to persons sent abroad on
government missions.
Disability Only
Switzerland has no exemptions
except physical or mental disabil-
ity. Moral or religious grounds do
not bring deferment. Every male
Swiss is ordered to begin service
at 20, but in practice a man can
apply for service as early as 18 or
as late as 24.
South' Africa's government,
which maintains a policy of strict
racial segregation, drafts only
white males. Nonwhites are
exempt.
After nine months of active duty
and brief summer stints for three
years, the South African has no
further training, but he remains
in the reserves until he is 65.
Students Not Deferred
Mexico is one of the rare coun-
tries that does not defer students.
Draftees train only on Sunday,
when students are not in class.
Exemptions are granted only for
physical disabilities.
. Peru's draft applies only to
youths 20 years old.
The Soviet Union drafts youths
17-18 who have finished high
school and those 19 regardless of
whether they have finished.
College students receive military
training during the school year
and also spend periods in training
after their second and fourth
years.
After they graduate from col-
lege, most enroll in the Officers'
Reserve and are subject to call in
national emergencies. But some
college graduates are called into
service immediately, usually those
with engineering or other techni-
cal specialities.
China's Regulations
Alli men in Communist China
are subject to the draft at 18.

Tijose who enter the army serve
three years. The term of service
in the air force is four years and
in the navy five years..
Most West Germans fulfill their
military commitment after they
finish high school and before they

start college. There are few 18-
year-olds in German universities
-that is when they become elig-
ible for callup.
Among countries without any
draft law are Uruguay, Lebanon,
Saudi Arabia and Jordan.

Classes: Large Lectures
Or Small Sections Best?

What is the ideal yardstick for
determining class size?
"Teachers and students prefer
small classes but 'preference' alone
may not be the best standard,"
says Stanford C. Ericksen, direc-
tor of the Center for Research in
Learning and Teaching.
For most teachers the question
of class size usually means: how
many students can I teach in one
class and still retain some degree
of interchange and recognize each
student as an individual person?
"In the past ten years," mount-
ing criticism has maintained that
class size is not the most impor-
tant factor in teaching effective-
ness in higher education. Teaching
procedures may be more impor-
tant, Ericksen says in "Memo to
the Faculty," published by the
center.
"We should ask such things as:
what is the appropriate use of dis-
cussion or dialogue opportunities;
do different methods and fre-
quency of testing have an effect?
These questions are often over-
looked by asking only questions
about class size, Ericksen reminds.
Quality of teaching must not be
overlooked. "A student in a small
class may develop greater interest
in the subject than if he were a
member of an auditorium-size lec-
ture course.

ed to acquire discussion skills or
laboratory techniques. It is also
important when the student is
expected to take an active part in
the course, such as providing
examples, distilling principles from
discussions, giving reports, ex-
pressing value judgments, and
drawing implications from the
subject matter.
"Large classes are just as effec-
tive as small classes for teaching
well defined factual information.
Class size should be governed by
the lecturing skill of the teacher,
costs in time and money, and by
the constraints imposed by the
physical plant.
World News
Roundup
MOSCOW - The Soviet Union
has launched another earth sat-
ellite in a very low orbit, the
kind that American scientists have
suggested are used for Soviet "spy
in the sky" reconnaissance.
A Tass official news agency
announcement yesterday said No.
120 in the unmanned Cosmos se-
ries of Sputniks was launched
Tuesday. The delay in the an-
nounement was not exptlained.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
THURSDAY, JUNE 9
Day Calendar
Student Laboratory Theatre -- The
University of Michigan offers as its
15th Student Laboratory Theatre pro-
duction of the 1965-66 season two
plays: Harold Pinter's "The Collection"
and Michel de Ghelderode's "Pantag-
leize-A Farce To Make You Sad." The
plays will be presented admission-free,
Thurs., June 9, 4:10 p.m. in the Arena
Theatre, Frieze Bldg.
General Notices
French and German Objective Test:
The Objective Test in French and Ger-
man administered by the Graduate
School for doctoral candidates is sched-
uled for Thurs. afternoon, July 7,
from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Natural Sci-
ence Aud. ALL students planning to
take the objective test must register
by July 6 at the Reception Desk of
the Graduate School Office in the
Rackham Bldg.
For further information call the Re-
ception Desk, Office of the Graduate
School, 764-4402,
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Barber-Colman Co., Rockford, Ill.-
Managerial candidate, BS in Engineer-
ing, MBA, and 2-5 yrs. exper. in in-
dustry. Bkgd. in statistics, math, com-

puter application, inventory control,
budget and marketing and sales. Top
managerial potential.
Commonwealth of Kentucky-Actuar-
ies in both casualty and life fields
for work in State Department of In-
surance in Kentucky. Trng, actuarial
sd, and trngK in math and insurance.
Recent grads and alumni.
Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago,
III.-In controller's division: Senior
cost acct., grad plus industry exper. pre-
fer. Junior cost acct., degree, no ex-
per. Liaison rep., degree, MBA prefer.,
no exper. Asst. liaison rep., degree, no
exper. In management services division.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
Christian Science Organization, Tes-
timony meeting, Thurs., June 9, 7:30
p.m., 3545 SAB.
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance
with instruction, open to everyone,
Fri., June 10, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.
Newman Student Association, Com-
munity mass and supper, Fri., June 10,
5 p.m., 331 Thompson.
/ Uac SUMMER UISING2

r U

FRIDAY and SATURDAY
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR
BUSTER KEATON
(1924)
I In
I, SHERLOCK, JR.!
CHARLIE CHAPLI N
* (1923)
THE PILGRIM
The Two Greatest Directors of
Comedy in Cinema History!
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
* ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
Iw r r w w ~ w r w w w w r ww w rIwrr w~ w .s

' '

Systems analyst, degree necessary. Sys-
tems services supervisors, degree de-
sirable. Programmers, degree not man-
datory.
Bethlehem Steel Corp., Bethlehem,
Pa.-Experienced Attorney interested
in labor relations work. Grad with
some courses in labor law. 1-4 years ex-
per, in labor relations or interest plus
1-4 years in litigation in some area of
law.
Local Ad Agency, Ann Arbor, Mich.
-Six person agency wants woman as
administrative assistant, variety of du-
ties depending on experience and qual-
ifications, typing, filing, copy writing,
library research, billing, etc. Prefer de-

gree, and some ad agency exper., but
not required.
Computer Applications, Inc., Los An-
geles Area near Westwood, Calif.-Two
openings for Senior aMthematicians.
Masters, prefer PhD, plus 2 yrs. exper.
in programming, Primary interest
should be in numerical analysis, some
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SummerRegistration-Male and fe-
male registration asins to assist
with summer registration, June 27 and
28. $1.25 per hour. Contact Office of
Registration, 3007 Administration Bldg.

-i

CANOE RACE
Registration 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Tues., Wed. & Thurs.
DIAG

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Conference Studies
Motivations of Poor

responsible to a class of 200 stu- BRUSSELS -- French Foreign
dents will likely prepare his ma- Minister Maurice Couve de Mur-
terial quite carefully and be more ville has accepted an invitation
concerned about the quality of to visit Washingtin in September
his presentation than when "lec- for talks on the international sit-
turing" a class of less than 20 uation, U.S. sources reported last
students, he notes. night.
Again, an instructor might be The invitation was extended by
primarily interested in presenting Secretary of State Dean Rusk at
factual material. "Research evi- the North Atlantic Treaty Orga-
dence indicates that where infor- nization foreign ministers con-
mation is transmitted in one di- ference.
rection-that is from teacher to

SUMMER WEEKEND
JUNE 10-11
"SUMMER UPRISING
FRIDAY
"Under The Yum Yum Tree"
FREE OUTDOOR MOVIE
Dance Concert
Snake Dance to Movie
SATURDAY
Canoe Race Tennis Tournament
Picnic Watermelon Raffle
Car Rally Dance with the Marksmen

Welfare recipients differ from
most middleclass Americans in
their values and orientations to-
ward public support, a University
authority explained recently at1
the 93rd annual forum of the
National Conference on Social
Welfare.
Edwin J. Thomas, professor of
social work and of psychology, cit-
ed eight proposals which, pending
further inquiry by researchers, in-
dicate some small correlation be-
tween psychological dependency
and economic deprivation:
-Chronic welfare recipients do
display somewhat more psycho-
logical dependency than non-
chronic cases.
Chronic welfare recipients, in a
comparison study with middle-
class Americans, tended more to
subject themselves to, or live in
harmony with, nature, tended to
focus on being rather than doing,
and tended to be oriented toward
the present rather than the fu-
ture, Professor Thomas explained.
-Welfare recipients differ from
most middle-class Americans in
their values and orientations to-
ward public support.
Accept Dependence
Research results, Thomas said,
can "be interpreted as revealing
that. welfare recipients are gen-
erally accepting of their public
dependence, dependent psycho-
logically, and mainly lacking in
the value orientations character-
istic of middle-class Americans."
But, he added, there is "signifi-
cant diversity" within welfare re-
cipients as a group, and one study
indicated that only a minority of
recipients is content to receive aid
without questioning it.
-As a group welfare recipients
are very diverse psychologically,
with perhaps fewer possessing a
stereotyped syndrome of psycho-
logical dependency than those who
distinctly do not.
-The assumed adverse effects
of prolonged unemployment are
greatest for higher status un-
employed and lease for their lower
status counterparts.
Deprivation and Gratification
-The effects of economic de-
privation are in part a matter of
relative deprivation and gratifi-

cation. Those having downward
mobility when unemployed exper-
lence relative deprivation, consid-
ering their prior level of well
being, and those, having little
downward mobility when unem-
ployed experience relative gratifi-
,%ation, compared with their earlier
level of well being.
-Need to achieve accounts for
a small increment in economic
rewards for those with low in-
comes, but it is unrelated to
whether or not work is taken.
--Incentives and expectations of
gain account more for level of
earnings of low income groups
than does the need to achieve.
Impersonal and Social
-Impersonal and social factors
account for most of economic de-
privation, and psychological fac-
tors, including those of psycho-
logical dependency, are minor de-
terminants.
It is possible that social scien-
tists have over emphasized the
significance of psychological de-
pendency, and "our conceptions
now merit reconsideration," Pro-
fessor Thomas concluded.
Over 5,000 persons from all
parts of the nation attended the
National Conference on Social
Welfare. Theme of the world's
largest forum on social welfare
was "Social Welfare's Role in
Economic Growth.

students, class size is probably not
a critical factor as long as all
students can hear the speaker and
read the blackboard or the screen.
Ericksen states, "Class size de-
cision must be predicated on in-
structional objectives - what
should the student know and be
able to do as a result of taking
the course. Small classes are de-
sirable when the student is expect-'

WHAT'S AN
ADLER J-4?
Keep watching
for answer

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DIAL
8-64 16

dom

ENDS
SATURDAY

"RAILROAD MAN"
* @ STARTS THURSDAY 0@

PEOPLE WHO LAUGH
(at people cutting*
buttons off people...
WON'T BLUSH!....
(at"words that are
still startling!...
and fun it is/i
-NY Times)

. ..

WY

DIAL 5-6290
ENDS TONIGHT
Tom
and
IRfk

sLE s: "typical of
A iimaginative
i, poarts
which d. ~I"gt

toIm Wsmiys
"GO SEE IT!"

W-NEXT *
"EYE OF THE NEEDLE"

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EVERYIIERE THEYLIVEI AND FOUlGhlT-

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One of the greatest works in the dramatic literature of western civilization,THE ORESTEIA
gave tragedy its vocabulary of values. A chilling trilogy of plays of mounting hor-
ror and fascination, it introduces the theatre's greatest tragic heroine-Clytemnestra.
JUDITH ANDERSON
IN AESCHYLUS'
THE ORESTEIA
TRANSLATED BY RICHMOND LATTIMORE
ALEXIS SOLOMOS Artistic Director R

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rs re side by side!
MIRISCH COMPANY ACADEMY
EDWARD LALPERSONA
MNORBEST
PICTURE
SWW - (1964)
MaetaNE. TONY
BILLY WILDER'S RICHARDSON'S

Aristophanes' timeless comic masterpiece is a delightful, satiric romp through man-
nered Athens.THE BIRDS' extravagant plot and circumstance, outrageous clowning,
and spectacular fantasy make contemporary comment in side-splitting style.
BERT LAHR
IN ARISTOPHANES'
THE BIRDS
TRANSLATED BY WILLIAM ARROWSMITH
ICHARD KIRSCHNER Executive Director
S JOHN MICHAEL KING JACK FLETCHER

Also Starring s
DONALD DAVIS

JACQUELINE BROOKES

LLOYD HARRIS FREDERIC WARRINER DINA PAISNER KAREN LUDWIG RUTH VOLNER
RUBY DEE
Scenery and Festival Stage Designed by ELDON ELDER Lighting by GILBERT V. HEMSLEY, JR. costumes for The Oresteia by MR. SOLOMOS
Costumes for The Birds by MR. ELDER Choreography for The Oresteia by HELEN MCGEHEE Choreography for The Birds by GEMZE DE LAPPE
Music for The Oresteia by IANNIS XENAKIS Music for The Birds by HERMAN CHESSID
Entire Production Conceived and Directed by ALEXIS SOLOMOS

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CAST A GiAN

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