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June 03, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1966-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

7th.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY,

FRID A'P..FTTV '. ''t _ 1099

'0 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

11.Tt' .Y, U ' TTTII' S, 1 n JbbUL,~LJ~~d~A~U

6

Ub.11
~tay
By The Associated Press
ublic school teachers se
underline labor contract
.ds failed to report to<
ns yesterday and para
t schools and four subs

isSchool Teachers'
out in Detroit, Flint

eking
t de-
class-
.lyzed
urban

roit systems.
)ne teachers' union official de-
[bed the situation as a strike,1
lough such are prohibited byj
lic employes in Michigan. But
law was amended in 1965 to
e them the right to organize;
I bargain collectively.
ismissal, loss of seniority and
er automatic penalties under!
previous law were withdrawn.
Romney To Meet
xov. George Romney said he
lid meet with the State Labor'
diation Board "to get a full
ure of what's happening ...
1 to determine what steps, if
';are to be taken."
You can't have law and order!
ublic employes can strike with
unity," Romney told a news
ference Wednesday.
icket lines manned by mem-
s of the AFL-CIO Michigan
eration of Teachers were up
38, schools in the Detroit area,
Lading schools in Taylor Town-
, Melvindale and North Dear-
n Heights, with a total en-
ment of about 24,500.
dembers of the independent
chigan Education Association
ceted an estimated 55 schools
Flint and forced the closing
il secondary schools-four high

schools and eight junior high
schools.
Tom Hill, an official of the
AFL-CIO union estimated 400
members failed to report and an-
other 100 called in sick in Taylor
Township; 125 out of a total of
220 failed to report in Melvindale
and' 55 out of 113 failed to show
up in North Dearborn Heights.
Union officials said at least one
high school and one junior high
school were closed in Melvindale
and two high schools and three
junior high schools were closed in
Taylor Township.
"The strikers are tremendously
successful, with the results ex-
ceeding our own prediction," said
Hill. "A majority of the schools
involved are educationally closed,
with the remainder crippled."
"There is no real education tak-
ing place in any of the three
school districts," Hill added.
In Flint, Associate Superinten-
dent Maurice Frost estimated only
150 of 800 secondary school teach-
ers showed up for classes while
about half the students stayed
away.
Elementary Schools Open
Frost said all 43 Flint elementary
schools were in operation, adding
that some of the reporting sec-
ondary teachers probably would be
shifted to the elementary schools
in an effort to keep them open.
There was no immediate indica-
tion how long the walkouts would
last,

"Our pos tion is the same as
before the strike," said Hill. "We
are willing to sit down and bar-
gain."
Petition Denied
Four Genesee County circuit
judges had denied a petition by
the Flint school board to stop the
planned "day of protest" walkout
today by Flint area teachers.
The Michigan Association of
School Boards has urged local
boards to impose penalties against
strikers. These could include dis-
missal, demotion and loss of ten-
ure.
But Hill declared that teachers
would not be intimidated by the
threats.
Describing the school board
group's statement as an unsophis-
ticated approach to collective bar-
gaining, Hill said:
"I think it will give teachers a
good deal more determination. To
talk about blacklisting teachers is
one of the most odious things I
ever heard."
At least one school board has
come out in opposition to the
Michigan Association of School
Board's statement.
Protest Due
The Ann Arbor Board of Educa-
tion Wednesday night said it
would lodge a protest in the form
of a letter to the Michigan School
Board Association Journal.
Ann Arbor board president
Lloyd T. Williams Jr. was spe-

cifically critical of a provision
calling for the names of striking
teachers to be placed on a list
which would be made available to
any future employer.
A $444,800 pay raise was nego-
tiated with Ann Arbor teachers
this year.
The school board in Dexter, a
small community about 10 miles
west of Ann Arbor, has unani-
mously adopted the MASB reso-
lution.
All the suburban Detroit AFL-
CIO groups are asking a base'
salary of $5,700 to $6,000 for
bachelor of arts degrees and a
maximum in eight to 10 steps' of
$9,400 to $9,700.
Under federation proposals,
teachers with masters degrees
would start at $6,000 to $6,400,
with a miximum of $10,000 to
$10,500.

FIL
'Bring Up 13
Off Dead Hui
By BETSY COHN
Unless the idea of humor has
been drastically renovated since
1938, there is little comedy ob-
vious in Howard Hawk's "Bring-
ing Up Baby." Watching Cary
Grant and Katherine Hepburn
romp about in this farcical pro-
duction, is like an endless tum-
ble through an unending mass of
scotch tape with nothing sub-
stantial on which to cling.
What cohesion there is, is a
messy array of slap-stick, a gooey
assortment of pat lines whose
conclusions are easily predictable
and a transparent plot that be-
comes more annoying as its story-
line becomes further entangled.
Cary Grant plays an unconvinc-
ing zoologist who spends his life
piecing together fragments of
dinosaurs. He works with his se-
vere, sticklfigure-fiance, Nancy,
who is the conventional staunch
lady hero.
She vows that nothing domestic
will interfere with their careers
and appoints a 400-boned double-

IUUY IF UL4
mor Cliches
mastodon as their "baby."
Grant plays an emotionless role
as he- watches his double jointed
mastodon and single dimensioned
life being laid out before him.
Keeping within the cardboard
framework of the character he
has been portraying, Grant pro-
ceeds in his usual jaw-hanging
manner to become totally en-
gulfed in the chaotic cosmos of
lively double-jointed, Katherine
Hepburn. She portrays a wealthy
woman who has nothing better
to do than devise schemes and
snares in order to keep Grant
close by her side.
Hepburn takes him through a
distorted maize of mock hilarity:
the situaions are pointless and
humorless and the amusement
tries in vain to borrow from ab-
surdity, flippant-back-and-forth
dialogue and exaggerated situa-
tions.
"Bringing Up Baby" is somewhat
of an overactive movie: too much
physical action, though nothing
strenuously mental.

* JAZZ

in the Sun
SUNDAY, June 5, 5:00 P.M.
FREE - West Park Band Shell - FREE
* RON BROOKS QUINTET, VOCALIST
* DETROIT CONTEMPORARY 4
-Less than a mile from U of M campus between Huron & Miller

MS

UAC
presents

J

*

m

gi

DID

DID!
YOU?

4

SLX WeEKS LATER:
Detroit's Northern High Still
'Bears Marks of Rebellion

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

DETROIT (R) - Nobody paid
much attention when a handful
of dissatisfied students organized
a boycott of classes six weeks ago
at Detroit's predominantly Negro
Northern High School,
But within days, the handful
had been joined by most of the
school's 2,300 students in a four-
day walkout, had won support
from adult civil rights groups, set
up a freedom school and won the
apparent removal of their prin-
cipal.
Northern still bears the marks
of the bloodless rebellion and stu-I
dents, teachers and parents are
attempting to resolve grievances
in a move that could alter the

Student leaders deny faculty
members have been threatened or
mistreated and counter with a
charge that some teachers have
been changing grades in reprisal'
against the students.
A 19-member committee com-
posed of students, faculty and
parents, is looking into grading
standards, faculty qualifications,
the physical plant, extra-curricular
activities and other conditions at
Northern.
The president of the Detroit
Board of Education, Dr. Remus G.
Robinson, has asked the panel for+
a preliminary report by June 14,
ten days before the last day of
school.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent. in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
FRIDAY, JUNE 3I
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"How to Plan, Install, Conduct,
and Measure Management Training":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Cinema Guild-"Bringing Up Baby":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Dept. of Speech University Players
Production - George Bernard Shaw's
"Misalliance": Lydia Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, 8 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Candidates who expect to
receive degrees in August, 1966, must
have at least three bound copies (the
original in a "spring binder") of their
dissertation in the office of the Grad-
uate School by Mon., June 20. The re-
port of the doctoral committee on the
final oral examination must be filed
with the Recorder of the Graduate
School together with two copies of the
thesis, which is ready in all respects
for publication, not later than Mon.;
July 18.
Doctoral Examination for Robert'
Harold Rasche, Economics; thesis:
"Bond Prices, Interest Rate Structure,
and Debt Management Policy," Fri.,
June 3, 105 Economics Bldg., at 2 p.m.
Chairman, R. L. Teigen.
Doctoral Examination for Charles
Daniel Johnson, English Language &
Literature; thesis: "A Pedagogical
Study in Contrastive Cultural Analy-
sis Illustrated by Steinbeck's 'Travels
with Charley in Search of America',"
Fri., June' 3, 2601 Haven Hall, at 4
p.m. Chairman, C. F. Wells.
Doctoral Examination for Dennis Pa-
pasian, History; thesis: "Nicholas Ivan-

ovich Kos tomarov: Russian Hlistorian. Assistant 'Investment and group staff
Ukranian Nationalist, Slavic Federal- attorneys, Assistant medical director.
ist," Fri., June 3, 3609 Haven Hall, All require appropriate degrees and no
at 3 p.m. Chairman, H. W. Dewey. or limited experience.
U.S. Army, Frankford Arsenal, Phila-
Doctoral Examination for Mark delphia, ParyEngineering positions to
Reader, Political Science; thesis: "The be filled by experienced engineers in
Political Criticism of George Orwell," Metallurgy, Chemical and Mechanical
Fri., June 3, 4609 Haven Hall, at 9:30 fields.
a.m. Chairman, Frank Grace. Wayne County Juvenile Court, De-
troit, Mich.-Several vacancies in June
Doctoral Examination for Rodolfo for Casework Aides. BA in Soc. Sci-
Gonzalez, Electrical Engineering; thes- ences or education with good academic
is: "Synthesis Problems in Linear record, no experience required.
Threshold Logic," Fri., June 3, 1028 E. Fidelity Mutual Life Insurance Co.,
Engrg. Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chairman, E. L. .hiladelpnia, Pa.-Desire to fill imme-
Lawler. diate vacancy in Law Dept. with young
man of high academic standing in a
Doctoral Examination for Charles top law school who has graduated
Reading MacCluer, Mathematics; thesis: within the last three or four years.
"On Exceptional Polynomials," Fri., Involves general corporate practice of
June 3, 3015 Angell Hall, at 2 p.m. an insurance co. counsel, areas of taxa-
Chairman, D. J. Lewis, tion, real estate, contracts, claims
work, mortgages, and direct placement
financing. Excellent opportunity for
Plac m entadvancement in dept., or firm manage-
ANNOUNCEMENTS:-et All members of law dept. are of-
ANNONCEMNTS:ficers of the company.
Federal Service Entrance Examina- fcr ftecmay
tion ue e ceEntrnu ba n Management Consultants, New York
tion-Due to the large number of po- Area-Auditor Mngmn for internal auditsYofk
sitions still open in Ill., Ind., Kentucky, cororatiosdivsioinand darie
Mich.,Ohio, and Wis. area the FSEE Grad with good record, major in ac-
will remain open for applications un- cuni g odprefecPA, .10yeiar -
til Aug. 31, 1966. Opportunities cover
wide range of fields. Use application perience, some with public accounting
- + - -.. . + firm ,

unless the school board tries to
return Carty.
Asked whether Carty would re-
main as principal, Dr. Charles J.
Wolfe, assistant superintendent for
school administration, said, "I
don't know of any plan to do
otherwise."
The freedom school, set up at
St. Joseph's Episcopal Church and
attended by an estimated 1,700
students during the boycott still
is in operation.
The boycott also led to a study
of inner city schools by a citizens
committee which reported finding
that in 47 of 56 elementary schools,
fourth grade students were read-
ing at least eight months below
grade average.
In the same schools, sixth grade
students in 51 schools were read-
ing at least a year below grade
average, the committee said.
Come to aI
CHILDREN'S
CONCERT
SAT., JUNE 4, 11 A.M. & 2 P.M.
Slauson Junior High Aud.
Children 50c Adults $1.00
FOLK SINGING & DANCING

f r
f f
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
FOCUS-THE AMERICAN FILM DIRECTOR: :
r f
r f
r r
f r
HOWARD HAWKS
af
r r
(1)938 )
f r
f
rM
a Starring
KAT HAR I NE H EPBURN, CARY GRANT,
CHARLES RUGGLES & BA RY FITZGERALD
SH ORT: "A LEXA NDE R CA LDE R:
FROM T HE CI RCUS TO T HE MOON"
L I
r It,3~
3 r
IN T HE A RCH ITE CTUR E AUD 1TOR IUM
fADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
r
f r
4irass*r srrrs Irsr~~ssss~r

',

city's entire educational setup. Questionnaires
'Wait and See' Some 250 students have been
The student attitude is perhaps sent questionnaires asking them;
best described by 17-year-old for their assessment of the situa-
Charles Colding's comment that tion at the school before and after
he is adopting a "wait and see the boycott.
attitude" pending a final settle- "We're getting back into good
ment of school problems. patterns of learning," said George
Carty, who officially still is W. Donaldson, assistant principal.
principal, has not been at the "Things are going quite smoothly."
school since April 26. School board Donaldson said absenteeism is
officials say he has not been re- running about 18 to 20 per cent,
moved, but is studying Northern's which he said is normal.
problems at the Schools Center A student-faculty council has
Building 25 blocks away. been set up and is drafting a con-
Discipline Breakdown? stitution for joint government.
Several teachers have charged Colding, whose editorial in a
that Carty's removal caused a student newspaper charging the
breakdown in discipline and eroded school provided inferior education
the student's respect for authority. touched off the controversy, said
Two instructors said their lives students will not accept a per-
had been threatened several times manent settlement that does not
by students. include replacing Carty.
"I'm so scared it isn't funny," However, he said he doubted
said Mrs. Dimitra LeBeau. there would be further boycotts
I i

t
t

i

L

I I

found at the Bureau of Appointments
or on back page of the FSEE an-
nouncement. Send it to U.S. Civil Serv-
ice Commission, Main Post Office Bldg.,
Chicago, Ill.. 60607. Test dates for all
cities in this area will be determined
after sufficient applications are re-
ceived. Applicants will be notified of
time and place of exams.
INTERVIEW: THURS., JUNE 9-
Tulane University, New Orleans, La.
-School of Business Administration.
Dr. S. A. Zeff will interview prospec-
tive students; especially interested in
Engineers Science and L.S.&A. grads
for work toward MBA and PhD degrees.
Make appointments at Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 764-7460.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Salt River Project, Phoenix, Ariz. -
Seek recent grads with up to 2 yrs,
exper. with electrical untility speciali-
zation in BSEE degree. This is an im-
mediate opening with possibilities for
other contacts for those interested in
electrical engineering in the Phoenix
region.
Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Co.,
St. Paul, Minn.-Seeking grads for'
openings in the following: Administra-
tive agency supervisor. Statement Ac-
counting. Group sales representatives,.
Actuarial trainees. Programmer trainees.

For further information call 764-
7460, General Div., Bureau of Appoint-
menits, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Harrah's Reno and Lake Tahoe, Nev.
-21 or over, few 18 year olds. Openings
in food department, bar department,
gaming and miscellaneous. Details at
Summer Placement Service, 212 SAB,
Lower Level,
For further information, Summer
Placement, 212 SAB, Lower Level.
Registration for
UAC Summer Weekend
TENNIS
TOURNAMENT
Fri. & Mon., 10 A.M.-2 P.M.
SDIAG
ALL INVITED

i

4-=

DIAL 8-6416
PLAYING THROUGH
SATURDAY

"AN EXCEPTIONALLY GOOD
MOVIE! GO SEE IT!"
-Gill, The New Yorktr
' if ter Rttdstrllnolprtsentt
ROBERT SHAW - MARY URE i
Sthe Luck of
Ginger Coffey
AND

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Friday, June 3

6:30 P.M.

DIAL 5-6290

tiN THE WATERFRONT
the dinner-film series
of the Ecumenical Campus Ministry
at
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1432 Washtenaw $1.25 (dinner & film)
Please make dinner reservations-662-3580

r

Now
Tom
and
:9ii~

CLAUDIA CARDINALE GEORGE OKAIRIS.
BEBOZS GIL

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DIAL 2-6264
NOW

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PH. 483-4680
64'gtxoc.Or CARPENTER ROAD

The area's newest Drive-In is
easy to locate . . . Just 2 miles
south of Washtenaw-on Car-
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BOX OFFICE OPEN 7:00

..are side by side!
MIRISC COMPNY,.*ACADEM
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MMON BEST
PICTURE
UN WA'hv_ , .y l , r(1964)

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