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May 28, 1966 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1966-05-28

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THE MICHIGAN' DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 28, 1966

... .. . .x ... , ..r ......

eT'S ALL JOIN IN:
Vietnamese Demonlstrations Can Be Fun

SAIGON RP)-What's it like out
the streets with the mobs that
e plaguing the Vietnamese gov-
iment?
If it weren't for the deadly
ious issues involved, it might be
med fun and games, Saigon
nle.
It usually goes like this: A small
>wd collects outside the main
te to the Vien Hoa Dao, the
ain Buddhist institute about two
les from downtown Saigon.
There is a handful of young
iddhist monks, wearing robes
gray, brown, yellow or orange.
There are the youthful hard-
re demonstrators, boys and girls,
rrying the Vietnamese and
tddhist flags and the banners
nouncing the military govern-
ent and actions of the United
ates.
From the front of the institute'
ey start a march.
There may be fewer than 100
the procession at the beginning,
it along the way they pick up
ilowers. Many of these are boys
ily 7 or 8 years old, barefoot and
aring ragged shirts and shorts.
hey obviously have no under-
anding of any political issues in-
lved. They are just along for
e excitement.
These children could just as
sily be taking part in a pro-

government parade or a picnic,
except that they are urchins of
the street and they enjoy seeing
authority flouted.
Also joining in along the way
are scores of teen-age girls, gig-
gling and holding hands as they
run through the littered streets,
mingling vwith boys of their own
age.
There are a few old women,
their teeth and gums stained red
from the chewing of betel nut.
They often are among the most
shrilly vocal.
And then there are the agitators,
some of them with the familiar
faces seen at almost every dem-
onstration. Some undoubtedly are
Viet' Cong or their sympathizers,
out to take advantage of any un-
rest. How many of them there are
or how important they are in
keeping tension high is impossible
to determine.
Authority Acts
What happens when the dem-
onstrators race through the streets
depends on the reaction of the
day fdom the authorities. At times
they crack down swiftly, almost
before the marchers move. At
other times they let them roam
back and forth within a restricted

The demonstrators venture near
an imp'ortant intersection or a
thoroughfare leading to the down-
town area, or the U.S. Embassy
or some other sensitive spot.
There is the sudden snap of
tear gas grenades. The choking,
blinding white clouds fill the air
and the demonstrators break and
run.
Experience
With experience, the veterans of
the street are becoming wiser and
more adept in dealing with the
ordinary barrages of tear gas,
especially when tossed by hand by
the national police. A counter-
barrage of rocks normally follows
the first outburst of gas, and at
times some of the more daring
youths dart forward, pick up a
steaming cannister and hurl it
back toward the lines of police.
Youngsters also fashion pro-
tective helmets of plastic bags,
making them look like Halloween
figures. Monks and their scouts,
and sometimes volunteer bystand-
ers, move quickly among the flee-
ing crowd, handing out sliced bits
of lime to rub on smarting eyes.
When the mob gets bolder and
more serious reaction is required,
the tough airborne troops and
marines assigned to riot duty in
the capital move in. Firing their
rifles and light machine guns into

area.
But sooner or later
is halted.

the parade

the air, they press forward, with
the crowd retreating.
But Saigon is a big, sprawling
city and the demonstrators can
fade away into the winding streets
and alleys to form again in small
groups, breaking out in several
spots simultaneously to keep the
police and troops off balance.
The authorities have shown.
they can crack down hard. At one
point this week they sealed off
the Buddhist institute completely
with walls of barbed wire and
heavily armed troops. Nothing
moved.
So far there have been no mas-
sive efforts on. the part of those
opposed to the government, noth-
ing that could not be handled with
relative efficiency by police and
troops when the order was given
to get tough.
It might appear inconceivable
that the noisy little bands run-
ning through the streets, so many
of them children, could threaten
a government. But the nagging
tactics of the street protestors
become wearing and the turmoil
is always there.
Shortly before last midnight
troops had taken over again. The
fun and games, Saigon style, were
over for another night.
In the background over the
quiet streets, yellow flares hung
in the sky. Apparently some one
was still out there fighting the
Viet Cong.
I
ft

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
i
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, MAY 28
Day Calendar
Conference on the Initial Management
of the Acutely Ill or Injured Patient-
Rackham Bldg.. 8:30 a.m.
Cinema Gulld-"Sabrina": Architec-
ture Aud., 7 and 9 p.m.
Events Sunday
No Events Scheduled.
General Notices
The Library of Congress is establish-
ing a Center for the Coordination of
Foreign Manuscript Copying which will
have the following functions: to lo-
cate (1) foreign manuscript collections
which have been copied and are in this
country; (2) collections which are being
considered for copying; (3) collections'
abroad available for copying. would all

faculty members who have engaged in
or are planning to engage in this kind
of activity please send a list of manu-
scripts they have copied or would like
to copy to the Office of Academic
Relations, Graduate School, 1014 Rack-
ham)' Bldg., for forwarding to Washing-
ton,
Doctoral Examination for Robert
Paul Kopp, Mathematics; thesis: "A
Class of Banach Spaces of Analytic
Functions on the Unit Disk," Tues.,
May 31, 3231 Angell Hall, at 4 p.m.
Chairman, A. L~. Shields.
S Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:.
Peace Corps Assignments to the Trust
Territory of Micronesia Pacific Islands:
Special abbreviated application form
and no placement test make you avail-
able for this special program. Fill out.
shorter forms available at the Bureau
and be notified within 15 days, by
phone, of your acceptance. College
grads in any field, especially liberal
arts, for Elementary ed., Public Health
and Public works projects.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Grove, Division of Bristdi-Myers, St.
Louis, Mo. - Immediate opening for
statistician, preferably with a Mas-
ter's or PhD. In research and devel-
opment division going into new ex-
pansion.
J. N. Fauver Co., Inc., Detroit, Mich.
--Seek assistant to Controller. Bus. Ad.
grad with strong accounting bkgd, To
fill immediately.
Mario's Food Products Co., Detroit,
Mch-New grad with management po-
tential desired for Management Trainee.
Previous exper. not considered essen-
tial, general business or marketing edu-
cational background.
Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Mich. -
Urgent, immediate opening to be filled,
as Staff Auditor. Acetg. degree, some

exper. desirable, not necessary. Some
travel. Mechanical, Electrical, and:
Chemical Engineers needed also. Grads
with appropriate BS degrees, zero to
five years exper.
City of Port Huron, Mich.-Planning
Coordinator, degree in planning or rel.
field. Newly reorganized department
requires new zoning, renewal master
plan, programs. Dept.handles UCiti-
zen's Advisory Committee, and Urban
Renewal Programs.
The Fraser News, Fraser, Mich.-The
Fraser News, weekly paper, desires writ-
er and editor, B9 in Journ. preferable,
some publications exper., knowl. of
cameras helpful, layout experience use-
ful.
Management Consultants, New York
Area-Nuclear Safety Manager. Advanc-
ed degree in Phys., Bio-Phys., or, both,
recognized authority on nuclear safe-
ty. Responsible for safety and radiolog-
ical matters in design and operation
of nuclear power generation plants.
Management Consultants, New York
Area-Assistant Plant Manager to di-
rect factory level, insure efficiency.
Grad ME with Indus. Engrg. compe-
tence. 5-10 yrs. exper. in manufacturing
and assembling components.
Wisconsin Civil Service-Openings at
S. Wis. Colony and Training School,
Union Grove, and N. Wis. Colony and
Training School, Chippewa Falls, Wis.
Grad in soc. sci.. and two years pro-
fessional exper., one must involve con-
ducting adult training classes. Develop
and coordinate training programs for
colony employes. Application should be
received by June 2.
Management Consultants, New York

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Juddhist Leaders ftebuff Ky's
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For further information please call
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Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Announcement: Summer Placement
Service at 212. SAB is open year around
Students interested in jobs after the
first summer session should come in
and look things over. Camps, resorts
business and industry are still looking
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(Continued from Page 1)
There was an air of insecurity
even among Buddhists in Hue,
where students sacked and burned
the U.S. Information Agency i-
brary Thursday and threatened to
follow up by sacking the consu-
late. U.S. Consul Thomas Cor-
coran directed the partial evacu-
ation of civilians.
About 125 monks and nuns sat
down in front of the consulate and
announced they were starting a
48-hour hunger strike. But they
left quickly, after a monk told
them it would be unsafe to remain
there overnight.
Ky, after flying to Da Nang,
avoided questions about any visit
to Hue, 40 miles to the northwest.
He said the city was part of South
Viet Nam and implied he would
go there in due time. He refrained
from saying when.
Driving in Da Nang
The premier drove through Da
Nang streets in a motorcade, made
a speech at City Hall and promis-
ed an airlift of rice and vegetables
to the still disrupted city.
At Da Nang, a former mayor,
Nguyen Van Man, who disputed
Ky and wound up in a Saigon jail,
will be punished. Ky charged that
Man had diverted large sums of
government money for political
purposes.
Ky also told the populace he
wants total victory, adding "Peace
can't be achieved through nego-
tiations with the Communists."
Off to Thi
Then Ky boarded a jet for the
Marine base at Chu Lai and his
talk with Thi.
Before March 10, the two had
been uneasy associates in the
junta, with Ky supreme in the
air force and Thi supreme in the
1st Corps area, where he main-
tained close contact with the
Buddhists.
At least twice in the last 11
weeks Thi had spurned U.S. ef-
forts to get some kind of peace
meeting arranged. He changed his
zind unexpectedly Thursday.
Authoritative sources could shed
no light on the substance of the
conference. It lasted some time
and it obviously concerned their
differences, which are complicat-
ed by intense personal rivalry.
No American Reps
Other members of Ky's govern-
ment sat in, but U.S. officials said
no American was present.
The street fighting in Saigon
followed a rally of about 10,000
persons at the Buddhist Institute,
where speakers again denounced
Ky's government. The marines, in
full combat gear, broke it up with
tear gas and warning shots.
Tracer bullets fired by marines
over the heads of the crowd blazed
trails in the night sky. Some
Ph. 483-4680
NOW SHOWING
V..C.L.T .s
A. T *TIJRESI
(ilw msr m c~as) <:

youths were seized. At least two
were seen being struck with rifle
butts.
Crowd Flees
The crowd fled intosthe narrow
alleyways and streets surrounding
the Buddhist Institute as the ma-
rines advanced.
No Americans were seen on the
streets except for a U.S. Army
Military Police Jeep with the
Vietnamese authorities.
In the crowd there were occa-
sional shouts of "American go
home!" but no attempts were
made to move toward American
facilities in the area of the march.
Parades of Demonstrators
Demonstrators carried effigies
of Ky and Chief of State Nguyen
Van Thieu. These had been parad-
ed through the streets along with
banners, Vietnamese and Buddhist
flags until the procession stopped
at a traffic circle and burned
them.
The war came back into the
spotlight yesterday with a series
of brisk engagements to the Me-
kong rear delta. A spokesman said
troops and planes killed about 94
Viet Cong in the canal-laced re-
gion on Thursday. Fifty of the
enemy were reported captured.
Whatever their ideas about stag-
ing another monsoon offensive,
the Viet Cong took the initiative
in one of these actions.
They threw about 600 men
against a 350-man Vietnamese
battalion based on the Inh Hoi
canal, 56 miles southwest of Sai-
gon, and two nearby outposts. The
spokesman said an air-supported
counterattack repulsed the Viet
Cong and they left behind 20 dead,
but government losses were heavy.
Light Encounters
Contact of allied forces with the
Communists elsewhere was de-
scribed as light and scattered as
the U.S. Command told of these
developments:
-U.S. air cavalrymen in Oper-
ation Crazy Horse have wiped out
the Communist battalion that
jumped a company of Americans
May 16 in the central highlands
near An Khe. While suffering
"above average" losses themselves,
they killed 311 of the enemy and
captured 29 in 11 days of fighting.
-U.S. Marine artillery lossed
barrages on two bands of Viet
Cong, estimated to total 125 to
150 men, sighted in the open in
the Chu Lai area 340 miles north-
east of Saigon. There was no im-
mediate assessment of the toll
taken by the shells.

-Several battalions of the U.S.
1st Infantry Division were dis-
closed to have been engaged for
10 days in a sweep, called Opera-
tion Lexington, near the outskirts
of Saigon. Among results: 29 Viet
Cong killed and 10 captured. Large
caches of food and ammunition
were seized.
Planes Active
American pilots flew 382 sorties
and South Vietnamese 257 in sup-
port of ground operations during
a 24-hour period up to dawn. U.S.
B52 planes from Guam bombed a
suspected enemy troop concentra-
tion in the hills 35 miles north-
west of Quang Ngai.
Monsoon storms over North
Viet Nam again limited air opera-
tions above the 17th Parallel
which in good weather have rang-
ed about 100 missions. Approach
roads to the Mu Gia Pass were
targets of two Air Force missions_
Carrier-based Navy planes flew 19
missions along the coast. A spokes-
man said they destroyed or dam-
aged nine barges, two junks, three
buildings and three bridges.
Cite 'War Crimes'
Coinciding with the relative lull
was a broadcast report from
Radio Hanoi that the North Viet-
namese Red Cross protested to the
International Red Cross in a let-
ter May 23 against what it called
barbarous crimes of the U.S.
forces. Among other things the
letter accused the Americans of
"intensifying their air raids on
North Viet Nam."
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF T418S COLUMN FOR AN-:
NOUNCEMFN'j'S is available to official.
ly recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
Newman Student Organization, Pic-
nic, May 29, 1:30 p.m., 331 Thompson.
* * *
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Sab-
bath service, John Planer, cantor, Fri.,
May 27, 7:15 p.m., William Present
Chapel.
S **
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Lec-
ture-discussion (informal), Tues., May
31, 7:30 p.m., 3rd fl., Union.

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