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February 21, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-02-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Lumumba Associates

U.S. Supports eace P1

grhts Law
lows Sias
tzenry May Sue'
S. Public officials

To

End

Congolese

Stri

WASHINGTON OP) - The Su-
preme Court ruled yesterday that
public officials accused of using
their authority to violate the con-
stitutional rights of citizens may
be sued for damages in federal
courts under an 1871 civil rights
law.
The court unanimously reinstat-
ed a suit brought by a Chicago
Negro, his wife and six children
against 13 Chicago policemen.
But the court, with Justice Fe-
lix Frankfurter dissenting, held
that the city of Chicago cannot
be sued under the act for alleged-
ly unlawful acts of its police of-
!icers.
The Negro family lost its suit in
both the United States District
Court and the United States Court
of Appeals in Chicago. These
courts ruled that the family had
no remedy under the old civil
rights law, known as the Ku Klux
act.-
In its ruling yesterday, the high
court held that public officials who
nisuse their badge of authority
are subject to damage suits, but
that Congress in passing the law
dd not make municipalities liable
for damages.
In his complaint, James Mon-
roe claimed 13 policemen investi-
gating a murder case broke into
hiis apartment on Oct. 29, 1958,
and struck, kicked and shoved
members of his family.

-AP Wirephoto
REPORTED SLAIN-Pierre Elengesa, Maj. Fataki and Jean Finant, from left, were among six asso-
ciates of slain Congo leader Patrice Lumumba who have allegedly been killed. United Nations Secre-
tary-General Dag HammarskJold told the UN Seourity Council yesterday that the murders occurred
in secessionist Kasai provinces

'FOR PRESSING NEEDS'-
Kennedy Requests Boost
I Social Security Tax
WASHINGTON (P) - President John F. Kennedy proposed
another increase in social security taxes yesterday to meet "pressing
social needs" and give the economy a boost.
In a letter to Congressional leaders, Kennedy recommended a
series of changes to provide more liberal benefits in some cases and
to extend coverage to additional workers.
Secretary of Walfare Abraham Ribicoff estimated the expanded
benefits would total $1 billion in the first 12 months. Kennedy pro-

Asks Act*on
To Alleviate

'Recession

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Sposed a further increase of one-
quarter of one per cent in social
security taxes levied against both
employers and employes, effective
Jan. 1, 1963. s
Similar Increase
Last week, the President pro-
posed a similar increase in the
tax, also effective Jan. 1, 1963, to
finance his health insurance pro-
gram for the aged.

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If both increases are enacted,
the social security tax will go up
from a combined total of six per
cent at present to eight per cent
starting in 1963.
Employer and employe each pay
three per cent now. The law pro-
vides for an automatic increase
to three and one-half per cent
each, for a total of seven, per
cent, starting- in 1963. With the
two increases Kennedy has pro-
posed, this -would rise to four per
cent each.
Promptly Enacted

WASHINGTON (A) - President
John F. Kennedy sent Congress
yesterday his bill to perk up areas
now depressed by sick industries
and jobless men.
Millions would be spent and
loaned to bring new industries
to the areas and new skills to the
men.
Congress already knew the'
President wanted such a program.
Yesterday it learned the specific
details.
In ,a bill forwarded to House
Speaker Sam Rayburn (D-Tex),
Kennedy proposed:
1) A $300 million loan fund.
The government would loan the
money to communities to expand
their industries or attract new
ones. No more than $90 million
could be loaned before July 1,
1962.
2) Seventy-five million dollars
in grants to help communities
supply the roads, water, utilities,
and other public facilities need-
ed by the new or expanded indus-
tries. This total figure would be
fixed in the bill, but Congress
could appropriate more funds for
grants from time to time.
4) Ten million dollars a year to
unemployed workers so they can
maintain themselves while study-
ing and developing new skills re-
quired by the new industries in
their communities.
4) Four and one-half million
dollars a year to depressed areas
that need tho money to plan pro-x
grams to improve their econo-
mies.
Reds Behind
Nationalists

Asia.Africa
Block Offers
UN Proposal
New Deaths Stir
Action By Members
UNITER NATIONS WP) - The
United States-under the shocking
impact of new political assassina-
tions in the Congo-threw its sup-
port last night behind a Asian-
African plan for peace in that
strife-torn nation.
United States chief delegate
Adlai E. Stevenson urged the
Security Council to approve an
Asian-African resolution authoriz-
ing use of force by the United
Nations if needed as a last resort
to stop civil war in the Congo.
Stevenson's appeal came after
Secretary-General Dag Hammar-
skjold dramatically anounced the
executions in southern Kasai pro-
vince of six associates of the slain
Congo former premier Patrice
Lumumba.
The United States delegate said
the Asian-African proposal was
the only practical measure before
the council for effective action in
the Congo.
Makes Clear
But Stevenson made clear also
that while the proposal made no
mention of Hammarskjold "it is
obvious that any Security Council
resolution calling for United Na-
tions action must be carried out b
the Secretary-General."
The big question was whether
the Soviet Union would veto the
proposal. Such action could result
in demands for an immediate
session of the UN General As-
sembly.
Stevenson said also there was
merit in a suggestion from Liberia
that the council meet in the Con-
go, but only after action was taken
here for restoration of law and
order. He said such a move would
"put the United Nations in Africa
with dramatic impact," and the;
United States Air Force might
supply the transportation.
New Report
Meanwhile a new UN report
from the Congo quoted the South
Kasai minister of justice as say-
ing the six executed Lumumba
followers had been tried before a
tribunal made up of chiefs of the
Baluba, Apende, Bakate, Bauba
and Bashille tribes and sentenced
to death for crimes against the
Baluba people.
A later communication reported
South Kasai officials as saying
that the seventh man, Gregoire
Kamanga, hadbeenK entenced to
five years in prison. Kamanga was
former minister of health for
Lumumba.
Ceylon, the United Arab Repub-
lic and Liberia sponsored the Con-
go peace plan which had support
of a large segment of Asian-
African nations.
Three Nations1

ADLAI E. STEVENSON
practical measure
AIRLINES:
Prep aire.
L"yoffs
NEW YORK (P) - The nation's
biggest, busiest airlines began
closing down operations yesterday
in the face of a four-day wildcat
strike of flight engineers.
The greatest tieup in American
aviation history loomed, with 84,-
000 air and ground employes tick-
eted for layoffs,
The loss in revenues and salaries
approached the five million dot
lars a day mark as the White
House failed in efforts to end the
strike against six airlines-includ-
ing three of the country's four
'biggest. Only United Airlines, se,
cond in passenger miles flown,
was unhit in the walkout.
Some 3,500 flight engineers
stayed away from their cockpits in
what they described as' a fight
for their union-and their jobs.
The only planes that can safely
take off without engineers - or
supervisory substitutes-are twin-
engine craft, and few of this type
attempt more than short hops.
World News
Rounidup
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - National steel
production, an indicator of the
country's economic health, reached
an eight-month peak in the week
ended Feb. 18.
The American Iron and Steel
Institute said yesterday output
jumped 3.8 per cent over the pre-'
vious week to an estimated total
of 1.6 million tons-the highest
since the week ended June 25,
1960.
* * s
CARACAS - A disgruntled na
tional guard colonel and a few
henchmen revolted against the
government yesterday and were
squelched without bloodshed, a
communique announced.
Thecolonel was arrested.
WASHINGTON - The Senate
yesterday passed an administra-
tion-supported bill to authorize a
major effort to persuade more for-
eign tourists to visit the United
States.
The measure would set up a %op
level United States travel service
under an assistant secretary of
commerce.
+ s s

CAPE CANAVERAL VP) - An
advanced Titan intercontinental
range missile registered a second
straight successful 5,000-mile test
flight last night, striking a target
area in the South Pacific.
Officials reported the 98-foot,
bullet-shaped missile met all test
objectives on the 30-minute, 17,-
000-mile-an-hour flight.
The success buoyed Air Force

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missile fired last night was e
tially the final combat-read
sign.
A forked tail of orange
burst from the Titan's double
rel first stage as the 1l
giant blazed across a clear
last night.

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Second Successful Test

Feb. 22

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Kennedy said the changes he
proposed yesterday, if promptly
enacted, "will give our economic
recovery program needed impetus."
The proposed changes would in-
crease benefits to a retired or dis-
abled worker from $33 to $43 per
month and reduce the age at
which men are eligible for retire-
ment from the present 65 to 62
years old.,
Kennedy's program would also
increase the amount of payments
to widows; of deceased insured
workers from the present 75 per
cent to 85 per cent of the worker's
retirement fund benefits.
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SALISBURY (P) - Prime Min-
ister Sir Roy Welensky said yes-
terday that Communism is backing
African nationalism.
He warned the Western powers
to be fully aware. of "the bloody
chaos this combination can pro-
duce."
The white government chief of
the Central African Federation
told a congress of the ruling Unit-
ed Federal Party that "the vicious
influence of African nationalism"
so affects some big Western na-
tions they are ready to desert the
whites in Africa.
"But fortunately," Welensky
added, "we are quite prepared to
bolster the morale of the gentle-
men overseas and we ourselves are
fully determined
He said troops of the Federation
-a British-run union of Southern
Rhodesia, Northern Rhodesia and
Nyasaland in which Negroes out-
number whites 25-1-will smash
any insurrection.

Those same three nations put in
another resolution demanding that
the Council condemn political as-
sassinations, and call upon author-
ities in Leopoldville, Elisabeth-
ville and Kasai "immediately to
put an end to such practices."
The resolution asked UN au-
thorities in the Congo to take all
possible measures, including use
of force, to prevent occurrence of
such outrages. It sought also an
those responsible for the killings.
investigation and punishment of
Delegates of the three nations
asked priority for their latest
resolution.
In addition George Padmore,
delegate from Liberia, said he was
prepared to introduce another res-
olution calling for a Council meet-
ing in the Congo, or a neighboring.
Congo country.

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BRUSSELS - King Baudouin
dissolved parliament yesterday be-
cause of a widening rift between
Premier Gaston Eyskens' Social-
Christians and their coalition
partners, the Liberals.

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