100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 26, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TOGO'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

FRIDAY, MAY

rwn TIlE 1~HCHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, MAY

= =

GC Finishes Year's Business

JUSTIFICATION:
Daniels Speaks on Russian Marxism

a

By BARBARA PASH
Student Government Council
Wednesday approved a motion by
Roger Seasonwein, '61, to rescind
its action in appointing the dele-
gation to the National Student
Association Congress in August.
The Council approved Season-
wein's motion appointing the fol-
lowing as NSA delegates: Richard
Nohl, '62, Chairman of the delega-
tion; Per Hanson, '62; John Mar-
tin, '62; Bea Nemlaha, '62; Ken
McEldowney, '62; Paul Carder, '62,
and Brian Glick, '62.
Alternates Named
Appointed as alternates were
Kay Pomerance, '64; Susan Still-
erman, '62; Philip Power, '62;
John Roberts, '62; William Glea-
son, '62, Seasonwein, and Daily
Editor Thomas Hayden, '61.
Eugenia Pann, '63, and Richard
G'sell, '63, will be observers. Mr.
and Mrs. Alan Guskin, Judith Op-
penheim, '63; Michael Olinick, '63,
and Fred Russell Kramer, '63, willI

also be observers, but without
compensation.l
Before final acceptance of the
1961-1962 budget submitted by
the treasurer, the Council made
certain changes.
Submit Budget
Summer mailing, which includ-
ed a description of the health in-,
surance plan and a form asking
for a listing of the high school
activities of incoming freshmen
was deleted from the budget and
the $800 allocated for this item
was transferred to the general
Council funds. Under Council
projects, the classification of In-
ternational Projects was added
with an allotment of $200.
The final financial report for
the period of July 1, 1960-June 30,
1961 (including estimated expenses
by the Finance committee) was
accepted.
The 1961 Homecoming budget
for $5,820 was approved, and the
event was calendared for Octo-
ber 27, 1961.

Student Relations Board ap-
pointments were approved. Han-
son, Douglas Brown, '62; Diane
Thimme, '63; Stan Sacks, '63;
Harvey Kaplan, '64Ph; Ed Lublin,
'62BAd; Caroline Dow, '62; Paul
Carder, '62; AlexFischer, '62;
Janice Bushong, '62E(I; Nathan-
iel Sach, '62, and Charles Judge,
'62BAd, were appointed for one-
year terms ending in May, 1962.
Student Book Exchange
Dennis Floden, '62Ed, was ap-
pointed manager of the Student
Book Exchange. The appointments
of Russell Charter, '62, and David
Eason, '63, as assistant managers
were approved. All three will have
one-semester terms expiring - in
January, 1962.
The Council also approved the
appointments of Eugene Pann and
Andrea Rumps, '63, for one-year
terms on the Summer Reading and
Discussion Committee.
SGC approved the appointment
of Joel Jacobson, '62, for a one-
year term on Cinema Guild Board.

By HARRY PERLSTADT
The Marxist doctrines are used
for self-justification and discipline
by the Communist leaders in the
Soviet Union, Prof. Robert Daniels
of the University of Vermont said
here yesterday.
"The role of the Marxist doc-

trine is self-justification for the
leadership and discipline for the
followers. The best way to gain
control in Soviet Russia was to
impose a narrow doctrine on one
area of Soviet life after another,"
Prof. Daniels said.

BOWLING
at
ANN ARBOR RECREATION
STUDENT RATES
MODERN -AUTOMATIC

God an Illusion in Buddhism,
Anthropology Speaker States

By GAIL EVANS
The notion of God is an unnec-
essary illusion in the Buddhist re-
ligion, Prof. Edmund R. Leach of
King's College said yesterday in
a lecture sponsored by the an-
thropology department.
Buddha is not the source of di-
vine power as is the Christian
God, he continued.
The fact that Buddha is al-
ways pictured in a sitting or sleep-

xS .": '" .. o.
,;"",'

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

'

.'.,' 9i4~p55r0~~y.~ . j ~ ..~. ...I.. ~ ~ r'.~ ____________________________________

1

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily ssumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
official publication of The Univer-
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Building,
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
FRIDAY, MAY 26
General Notices

Cinema Guild Board (one-year term
ending in May, 1962)-Joel Jacobson.
Approved: The following plan for
summer operation of Student Govern-
ment Council.

ing position exemplifies the reli-
gion's passive nature, aptly de-
scribed by the "Cult of the Dead."
Buddhism originally developed out
of Hinduism.
Buddhism in Ceylon
Among the youth of Ceylon,
Buddha hold little influence. The
religion appeals mainly to the
elders, he said. When worshipers
come to the temple ,they come
to contemplate death.
In contrast to the passivity of
Buddhism is Pluleyar, another
Eastern sect. This cult appeals to
the common people because it is
more active than the aesthetic
Buhhdism. In 'this faith God
comes down to main instead of
man having to reach up to God,
which makes Pulleyar more at-
tractive, he said.
Citing differences between east-
ern and western faiths, he said
that in the eastern beliefs there
are no historical beginnings like
the birth of Christ nor is there
a sacred book containing the words
of God.
Eastern Consistency
In the East it is important that
religion remain consistent since
followers believe that the ancient
is inherently good, he said.
The two main purposes of east-
ern religion are to reconcile man
to death, which is the intent of
Buddhism, and to create and
manitain life, which is the idea
behind Pulleyar.

The doctrine was the subject of
deliberate misinterpretation to
make it mean what it did not mean
and was used to justify the politi-
cal actions of the leaders, he
explained.
Alteration of Doctrine
"The alteration of Marxist doc-
trine was made in the name of
the doctrine. It is no longer the
prediction of inevitable events nor
a guide to pol"cy, but something
which comes after policy," Prof.
Daniels' said
"The doctrine has become empty
theoritical labels pasted on every-
thing the Soviet does," he said.
Commenting on the use of
Marxist doctrine in the arts and
music, Prof. Daniels said that the
Soviet view was similar to "18th
Century Conservatism in every
field outside the strictly political.
It is essentially bourgeoise na-
tionalistic romanticism.gs
Stalin First
Joseph Stalin was the first to
recognize the use of the doctrine
for political maneuvering during
his power struggle with Leon Trot-
sky in the mid 1920's. Stalin
fought against a strict doctrinal
interpretation because if one
"stood on solid Marxist ground
and looked at Soviet Russia, it
just didn't fit," Prof. Daniels said.
With Stalin the old formulas
did not matter. What they got
out of the doctrine was moral
justification and an agreement
with what exists in Russia, he said.
Wolgamot Society
To Present Play
The John Barton Wolgamot
Society will present "Comedy, Sat-
ire, Irony and Deeper Meaning,"
by Christian Dietrich Grabbe, at
8:30 p.m. today and tomorrow at
the Unitarian Church.

Approval of Activities:
1. Routine approval of summer ac-
tivities shall be delegated to the Of-
fice of Student Affairs.
2. There shall be a summer interim
committee composed of: John Martin,
Bill Gleason, Mary Wheeler, and Roger
seasonwein to deal with appeals and
intricate matters.

Greater Muskegon's YOU are invited
SIWAY to have fun in
FESTAL MUSKEGON, MICHIGAN!
June 30-- July 8
9 FULL DAYS OF ENTERTAINMENT!

605 E. Huron

NO 2-0103

following addition to Article V of their
constitution: "The executive committee
will consist of a spokesman, or co-
spokesmen, and other officers as
deemed necessary by the body as a
whole."
Approved: The following appoint-
ments to the Committee on Membership
in Student Organizations (one-year
terms ending in May, 1962): William
Gomez, Dorothy Morrall.

Memorial Day, Tues., May 30, will be
a recognized holiday for The University
of Michigan. Non-academic employes
will be paid for Memorial Day at their
normal rate.of pay if they have worked
the scheduled work day prior to and
immediately following Memorial Day.
Automobile Regulations: The Univer-
sity student automobile regulations will
be lifted with the completion of classes
on Fri., May 26. Office of the Dean of
Men.

Students who are receiving Education
and. Training Allowance under Public
Law 550 or 634 must (1) turn in Dean's
Monthly Certification form for May,
signed by all instructors, to the Dean's
Office by 5 p.m., Wed., May 31, (2)
Turn in a separate Dean's Form (signed
during final examinations) as soon as
exams have been completed; (3) sign
Monthly Certifications (IBM cards) for
May and June in the Office of Veterans'
Affairs, 142 Admin. Bldg., June 1, 2,
5, 6. Office hours at 8:00-12:00 a.m.
1:00-5:00- p.m.
The Exhibit Museum's planetarium
and movie showings will be closed on
Sat, and Bun., June 3-4.
The General Library and Undergradu-
ate Library will be open regular hours,
Tues., May 30 (Memorial Day). Divi-
sional libraries also will be open, with
the exception of the Astronomy, Bureau
of Government, Museums, and, Public
Health Libraries. Special schedules will
be posted on the doors of a few divi-
sional libraries which will be operating
on reduced hours for the Memorial Day
holiday.
Additional Hours are being added to
the General Library and Undergraduate
Library schedules, Sat., June 3. The
General, Library will be open 8 a.m. to
10 p.m., and the Undergraduate Library
will be open 8 a.m. until midnight.
Summary of Action Taken 'by Student
Government Council at its Meeting of
May 24
Corrected: The minutes of the pre-
vious meeting.
Approved: The following appoint-
ments:
National Training Laboratories Con-
ference-Bea Nemlaha, John Martin,
John Roberts. ,
NSA Coordinator (term to expire in
May, 1962)-Kay Pomerance.
Student Relations Board (one-year
term ending in May, 1962)-Per Hanson,
Douglas Brown, Diane Thimme, Stan
Sacks, Harvey Kaplan, Ed Lublin, Caro-
line Dow, Paul Carder, Alex Fischer,
Janice Bushong, Nathaniel Sack, Charles
Judge.
Student Book Exchange (one-semes-
ter terms to expire in January, 1962)-
Dennis Floden, manager; Russell Char-
ter, assistant manager; David Eason, as-
sistant manager.
Reading and Discussion Committee
(Summer) (one-year term ending in
May, 1962)-Eugenie Pann, Andrea
Rumps.

3. In September, the actions of the
summer interim committee may be re-
viewed by the Council.
Post Card Ballot: Anything other
than activity approval shall be decided
by the Council by a post card ballot
with interim committee recommenda-
tion included if possible.
Approved: The Financial Report for
the period of July 1, 1960 to June 30,
1961.
Approved: The Budget for the year
1961-62.
Approved: The Homecoming, 1961,
Budget.
Approved: There will be a special
meeting of Student Government Coun-
cil on Mon., May 29, at 3:15 p.m. in
the Council room for the purpose of
considering the report of the Commis-
sion on Year Round Integrated Opera-
tion of the University.
Approved: That Homecoming 1962 be
calendared for Oct. 27, 1962. (The
Michigan-Minnesota game.)
Approved: A report of the Elections
Committee certifying the results of
the all-campus elections held March
21, 22, 1961.
Approved: The calendaring of the fol-
lowing events:
Sept. 28, Oct. 25, Nov. 15, Jan. 16;
Union International Seminars.
Approved: Suspension of the rule,
"Final Exams: activities musthbe cal-
endared so as to take place before the
seventh day prior to the beginning of
a final examination period."; so that
the June 2-13 Bike Drive of the Wom-
en's League' could be calendared and
approved.
Approved: The calendaring and ap-
proval of: June 2-13 Women's League,
"Bike Drive," all women's housing
units.
Approved: A change in the constitu-
tion of and the granting of permanent
recognition to the Indian Chemical and
Metallurgical Engineers Association.
Approved: Changes in the constitu-
tion of the Americans Committed to
World Responsibility, pending notifi-
cation that the group has approved the

Approved: The following people will
receive Student Activities Scholarships
in the amount of $225 each: Caroline
Dow, Sandra Gentry. -
Postponed: Until the first meeting of
the fall semester 1961, consideration of
a motion concerning Residence Hall
Confidential Reports. (Vol. 6, p. 130.)
Approved: That the Council rescind
its action taken in appointing the dele-
gation to the National Student Con-
gress.
Approved: The following appoint-
ments to the National Student Con-
gress:
Delegates-Richard Nohl, Chmn. of
delegation; Per Hanson, John Martin,
Bea Nemlaha, Ken McEldowney, Paul
Carder, Brian Glick.
Alternates-Kay Pomerance, Susan
Stillerman, Philip Power, John Rob-
erts, William Gleason, Roger Season-
wein, *To6n Hayden.
*--Hayden will receive no funds
from Student Government Council as
an alternate,
Observers - Student Government
Council will supplement the amount
of money that John Feldkamp (Nation-
al Executive Committee status) will re-
ceive from the National Student Asso-
ciation, to enable him to attend the
National Student Congress.
Eugenie Pann and Richard G'sell will
be observers, being compensated in the
amount of delegates and alternates.
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Guskin, Michael
Olinick, Judy Oppenheim and Fred
Kramer will be observers but 'without
compensation.
Approved: That Student Govenrment

Council mandate its President to send
letters which convey the following:
A. To the Reverend Martin Luther
King:
1. An expression of our sympathy
with and support for those partici-
pating in the non-violent freedom rides.
2. An expression of our support for
and sympathy with the principles of
non-violence which motivate these rid-
ers and many other courageous South-
erners attempting to work for inte-
gration in the South.
3. Request to convey such expression
to those involved in these rides as much
as is possible.
B. To Governor John Patterson:
1. Our hope that in the future all
travellers in Alabama will receive ade-
quate protection under the law from
the State of Alabama.
2. Expression of our sympathy with
and support of those participating in
the non-violent freedom rides.
3. Expression of our condemnation
of the violence employed by those dem-
onstrating against the freedom riders.
4. An expression of our support for
and sympathy with the principles of
non-violence which motivate these rid-
ers and many other courageous South-
erners attempting to work for integra-
tion in the South..
C. To Attorney General Kennedy:
(Continued on Page 4)
Organization
Notices
Baha'i Student Group, Discussion:
"Genesis of a New World Order," May
26, 8 p.m., 2029 Ferdon Rd. Call NO
3-2904 for transportation.
Wesley Fdn., Grad. Student Fellow-
ship Dinner, 5:30 p.m., May 26, Pine
Rm. Phone reservations to NO 8-6881.

Miss America

Cou"t Ba^i

Miss Michigan Pageant
Preliminaries, 8:00 P.M. July 4
and 5; Finals, 8:00 P.M. July 6
Miss America of 1961, Nancy Anne
Fleming, will be on hand all three eve-
nings and will help crown the new Miss
Michigan! July _4 & 5 tickets, 75c-
$1.25--$2. July 6, $1--$1.75---$2.50
FREE attractions!
1. Miss Michigan Parade -July 3.
Bands! Floats!
2. Fireworks Display-July 2.
3. Queen's Cup Race -June 30.
The oldest sailing cnp race in America!
4. Sports Car Gymkhana - July 2.
Skill driving and exhibition of sports cars!
5. Racing Regatta - July 4.
All boat classes with handicap!
Jazz Concert-July 3
Three top musical groups to entertain
you! 8:30 P.M. at L. C. Walker Arena.
Count Basie! Bob Scobey Frisco Jazz Band and
L.ambert, Hendricks and Ross! This collection
of talent promises music rafiging from swing-
ing mad to a cheerful sound falling somewhere
between Dixieland and modern Jazz! Tickets,
$1.50 to $3.50.
Coronation BalI-July 7
Dance music by the Tommy Dorsey Or-
chestra directed by Warren Covington.
The newly crowned Miss Michigan and her
court will be on hand to add beauty to the
event. Advanced tickets, $1.50; at door, $1.75.
SPORTS NIGHT--June 30
top flight boxing and wrestling; profes-
sional and amateur.
SQUARE DANCE--July 8
with national and local callers.

ENTERTAINMENT and FOOD1

'1

I

7-12

Tonite

Appearing tomorrow night
MIKE SHERKER !

!

Tommy Dorsey sand
directed by
Warren covington

cafe promethean

508 E. Williams

For room reservations, tickets and additional information, write or call.
SEAWAY FESTIVAL, Reception and Accommodations Committee, 1065 4th
Street, Muskegon, Michigan.

- .

m

Starting
TODAY

call

BEGINS
WHERE
"PETON
PLACE"
LEFT
Off !

TONIGHT
THEY THUD!
Help hiss the slimy Baron Mordax
as 13 of Michigan's most famous
professors fall prey to his vorpal
sword and slippery noose. All 13
in person, with the John Barton
Wolgamot Players, in the most
notorious farce in German litera-
ture, Grabbe's
"COMEDY, SATIRE, IRONY
& DEEPER MEANING"
THIS FRI. & SAT. ONLY
MAY 26-27, 8:30 P.M.
Unitarian Church Auditorium
1917 Washtenaw

RETURN TO
PEYTDN PLAE
Based on the Novel by GRACE METALIOUS
CIN"'.SCOPE * COLOR' bWLUXE

Continuous
from
I o'clock
CAEREO
RO1MBER
PSERN
DIRECTED iT
ROSM

i

S.Go.Co Ciema uild
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
Autant-L.aro's Philip Barry's
THE
DEVIL IN THE FLESH PIAEPI TR
Based on the Radri guest novel
with
with Katherine Hepburn Cary Grant
Gerard Philippe Micheline Presle ACADEMY AWARD
Short: ELIZABETH (French Import) Short: HURRY, HURRY
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

"+I

A

I

I

p

_ -

r

I

At Both Stores

41

Y

I

I

Tickets (bearing list of the
cast) 95c at Bob Marshall's
or at the door.

I

I

I

"TOP-GRA
-Alton Cook, W

DIAL NO 8-6416
Shows at 7 - 9P.M.
ENDING SATURDAY
DE SUSPENSE!"
Morld-Telegram & Sun

I

SHOCK HIT ON BROADWAY! AND IN ANN ARBOR!
"THRILLING ENTERTAINMENT . .
A Genuine 14-Carat, 15,Below Chiller."
-N.Y. Herald Tribune
"POWERFUL . .
Nancy Kelly gave one of her greatest performances last night in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre."
-Ann Arbor News
"Nancy Kelly steps overnight into the front ranks of our younger
emotional actresses. I don't think anybody else in our theatre could
touch her."
-N.Y. World Tel. & Sun
"111 -year-old Patty Crowe gave a thoroughly polished, professional
performance as a psychopathic killer,"
--Michigan Daily

i

I

The League of
Gentlemen
a cracklin, witty thriller from the men who made "Sapphire"
starring JACK HAWKINS

on

ALL

Records

I

THE ANN ARBOR DRAMA SEASON

I

i

DIAL NO 2-6264

Feat

rd

.. n

jp-,-, - . , _' , ---*,--Nmwppm--1"7-

~~SSATUAYL
i . '

,ure 25 Minutes Later
4 SHOWS DAILY
at 1:05 - 3:40
6:15 and 8:55

presents
NANCY KELLY
re-creating her Broadway and Hollywood triumph in
"THE BAD SEED"

SAVE

up

to

50%

I

I

I

I

I U

I

0

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan