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May 20, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

wiets Agree

To

Supply

hlp to Laos Commission

OranForces
Attack Mob
In Algeria
ORAN, Algeria (P) - Heavily
armed French troops early today
broke up a mob of European set-
tlers who invaded the offices of the
Swiss consul and burned his files.
The consulate attack was a pro-
test against Switzerland acting in
the role of overnight host to Al-
gerian nationalists atFrech-Al-
gerian peace talks opening in
France -today.

!a,)

REPUBLICANS FAIL:
Education Bill Clears Obstac

Reds Comply
With Wishes
Of Canadians
To Send Helicopters,
Other Vehicles to Unit
Having 'Urgent Need'
GENEVA (P)-The Soviet Union
agreed yesterday to help in hurry-
ing helicopters, planes and trucks
to Laos for the International Con-
trol Commission so it can enforce
a truce.
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko, who has stalled the con-
ference with demands for veto
power over the commission's work,
gave the go-ahead for the first
major -action of the Geneva Con-
ference after four days of debate
at the insistence of Canada.
Gromyko agreed with Foreign
Secretary Howard C. Green of
Canada that there was/ urgent
need to get transport and com
munications equipment to the
Indian-Canadian-Polish commis-
sion in the Jungle kingdom.
Win 'Great' Victory
"I think we have won a great
victory," Green told newsmen. Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk also
was pleased about the way the
Canadian had swung Gromyko
around.
The 14-nation Conference sent
off n message to the three-power
commission asking it to list itsa
requirements. Conference sources
said light planes and at least four
helicopters are the most pressing
needs.
The action came as foreigri min-
isters began to head for home,
leaving the conference work of.
trying to establisb a neutral Laos1
to their deputies.,
Ready To Help
Indian Defense Minister V. K.
Krishna Menon told newsmen be-,
fore he left for home that he
understood the American, British
and Soviet governments are ready
to furnish equipment for the truce-+
teams. Indians and Canadian pi-
lots will fly Soviet machines.
Menon said he thought prospects
are favorable for a solution in
Laos, torn by rivalry between the
royal Laotian government on one
side and the Communist - led
Pathet Lao and the neutralists of
ex-Premier Prince Souvanna
Phouma on the other.-

Parley Stalls
In Exchanges
Over Truce

Charge Violations
Of Cease-Fire Pact

NEW LEADER-Lt. Gen. Chang Do-Young, arms folded, reviews
a military parade along with Maj. C-en. Pak Chung-Hi, con-
sidered 'the chief engineer of t~he uprising.
Yun Resigns in Korea
As MartilLwTightens
SEOUL (P) - President Yun Po-Sun gave his blessing to South
Korea's new military rulers and announced his resignation in a
humbly worded statement yesterday as the grip of martial law
tightened.
Push Crackdown
The military chiefs pushed a crackdown that included the arrest
of almost 3,500 persons. Official announcements said prisoners in-
cluded 2,500 hoodlums and '930 leftists considered potential Com-
mnist. suspects. A security decree
set up severe penalties for mem-
bersip in what it broadly termed DRAMATIC
anti-state organizations.
By accident or design, Yun's pres
announced resignation clouded
diplomatic relations between South D ante' "
Korea and its friends abroad, in-
cluding the United States. For- Translation by
eign envoys here have been ac-
credited to Yun rather than to theT
fallen government of Premier John
Now Korea's allies may face the FIRST U N ITA
legal puzzle of, whether to recog-
nize Lt. Gen. Chang Do-Young, Admissi
38-year-old chief of the junta that Reductions to DAC me
calls itself "the Supreme Council
for National Reconstruction. Tickets on sale at M
United States spokesmen here op-
posed -the coup.

BAN NAMONE, Laos (P)-Gov-
ernment and pro - Communist
Pathet Lao delegates yesterday
exchanged charges of cease-fire
violations and Laotian peace talks
again bogged down.
The neutralist delegation, the
third party at the conference ta-
ble, tried to act as mediator.
The government delegation de-
clared it was backing down on its
agreement to discuss a coalition
regime ahead of truce details and
now the cease-fire discussions
must come first.
"We cannot discuss politics
while Lao soldiers are being kill-
ed," said Gen. Sing Rattanasamay,
spokesman for the royal delega-
tion.
He charged the rebels were not
only attacking government guer-
rilla. strongholds on the central
plain but had even assaulted Ham
Heup. The village lies south of this
truce town 75 miles north of Vien-
tiane, the capital.
In view of this, Sing said it
was imperative the meeting begin
setting up a joint military com-
mittee to work with the Interna-
tional Control Commission in pre-
venting truce violations.
The Pathet Lao in turn charged
government forces had crossed the
river at Han Heup, which stands
astride the truce line, and moved
north.,

Troops Intervene
Troops intervened after riot po-
lice and the mobs fought a hand-
to-hand battle, with police using
rifle butts and tear-gas grenades
and the settlers hurling stones,
bricks and anything else at hand.
The battle, strung out along
more than 300 yards of a main
street in downtown Oran, kept the
city in turmoil past the midnight
curfew.
Overawe Mob
The raging, chanting mob was
overawed when tough regular sol-
diers appeared suddenly.
The mob withdrew sullenly and
as a parting gesture stoned the
offices of the mayor, a Gaullist.
The settlers massed on Oran's
broad Place des Victoires to pro-
test the peace negotiations at
Evian-Les-Baines.
There was violence also during
the night in Paris and rin Algiers
and Constantine, Algeria.
The outburst here started with
the Swiss consulate invasion.
The crowd threw the files and
papers into the street and made,
a bonfire of them.
No one was in the offices at the
time.

WASHINGTON (M) - President
John F. Kennedy's federal aid to
education bill rushed past a major
obstacle yesterday on the path to
Senate approval as a liberal Re-
publican attempt to cut and re-
vamp the $2.55 billion proposal
failed.
By a 50-33 vote, the Senate de-
feated an amendment proposed by
Sens. Jacob K. Javits (R-NY) and
John Sherman Cooper (R-Ky).
Theiramendment-would have
cut the three-year program by
$326 million, but it also would
have revised the formula for dis-
A point Board
To forestall
Railway Strike
WASHINGTON (AP) - President
John F. Kennedy yesterday set
up an emergency- board to head
off a strike against the nation's
railroads, called for 6 a.m. Mon-
day by the Railroad Yardmasters
of America.
The appointment of the emer-
gency board under the Railway
Labor Act blocks a strike for at
least 60 days. Kennedy named a
three-member board and directed
it to report its findings within 30
days.
Until 30 days after the report is
filed, Kennedy directed that no
changes, except by agreement, be
made in wage rates and work
rules.
Kennedy named Harold M. Gil-
den, Chicago attorney, as chair-
man of the emergency board.

tributing funds so that 10 states
would have received more money
under their amendment the first
year than under the original bill.
Considered Major Threat
The amendment was considered
one of the major threats to the
bill because its sponsors, Javits
and Cooper, are strong advocates
of federal aid to education who
might attract support from others
who favor school aid.
The bill, which provides grants
to states for public school con-
struction, teacher salaries, or both,
now is expected to pass next week.
Both Javits and Cooper are
expected to join Democrats in vot-
ing for it, although Cooper, while
fighting for the amendment, told
the Senate:
"Sometimes I'm terribly dis-
appointed in my friends on the
Democratic side of the aisle. It
seems to me sometimes they just
want to spend money. And they
do."
Morse Defends Bill
Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore),
floor manager of the Administra-
tion bill, defended it as "fair and

B'nai B'rith H illel Foundation
announces Shavouth services
conducted by BETH ISRAEL CENTER
Sunday and Monday, May 21 & 22 at 9 A.)

equitable all over the cout
North and South, coast to cos
Under the Javits-Cooper
mula, each state would have
ceived $20 for every pupil i
public school. In addition 15
income states would have rece
benef its swelling the total
pupil to as much as $65.
Under the Administration1
the grantshrange from $9.26
$27.79 for every school age e
in the state, whether or not
attends a public school.
The effect of the Javits-Coo
amendment would have beer
increase the grants to such
income states as Mississippi,
kansas and South Carolina
first year.
Another amendment was in
duced by Sen. Prescott Bush
Conn). It would bar federal fi
to schools that do not admit pu
because of race, color, creed
national origin.
Sen. Bush said the amendma
would be brought to a vote M9
day. It is given little chance
passage.

MEMORIAL SERVICE 10 A.M.

Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel ... 1429 Hill

Co MEI

ro

CHirk;CrI

i1

ON

7 HE.

ARTS CENTER
sents

INFERNO"
JOHN CIARDI
r at 8:30
RIAN CHURCH
ion $1.25
embers and groups of 10.
Varshall's Book Shop.

11

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Sundays-
8:00 A.M Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month)
11:00 A.M. Morning prayer and sermon
7:00 P.M. Evening prayer.
(Holy Communion on first Sunday of
month)

IUII

World News Roundup
By The Associated.Press ed States representative at the
WASHINGTON - Sen. Albert United Nations.
Gore (D-Tenn) called yesterday * * *
for the ousting of the Joint Chiefs KNOXVILLE, Tenn.-A Unied
of Staff for their role in the Cub- States District Court jury yester-
an invasion debacle, but met swift day ruled the United Mine Work-
opposition from fellow senators. ers Union and its welfare fund
Gore touched off a brisk con- trustees violated federal antitrust
troversy when he talked to re- laws by conspiring with major
porters after leaving a Senate coal firms to monopolize the bi-
Foreign Relations Subcommittee tuminous coal industry.
session where Gen. Lyman Lem- In a decision which has possi-
nitzer, chairman of the group, was ble far-reaching emplications, the
testifying in secret about the mili- jury awarded a $270,000 judg-
tary's role in the abortive invasion ment against the UMW to Phillips
attempt of last month. Brothers Coal Co., a small east
* * * Tennessee mine. The company
JERUSALEM - Adolf Eich- claimed it was forced out of busi-
mann's efficient death squads ness by the conspiracy.
rushed into Yugoslavia just two Lawyers in the case said this
days behind the invading German was the first time in the nation's
army in 1941 and began method- history that a union has been ad-
ically exterminating 60,000 Jews, judged guilty on a national level
witnesses at his trial testified yes- of violating antitrust laws.
terday. The jury deliberated two and a
Yugoslavia's remaining 15,000 half days before reaching its ver-
Jews escaped Eichmann's direct dict. The month-long trial was
orders they be slain only. because preceded by two years of prepara-
Germany's Axis partner, Italy, ob- tion by attorneys on both sides.
jected to large-seale manhunts * * *
* * * MIAMI-Fifty-two American re-
WASHINGTON-Press officer patriates from Fidel Castro's Cuba,
Lincoln White said yesterday the including the last United States
State Department is discussing newsmen there, returned last night
possibility of the visit to Latin from imprisonment or harassment
America by Adlai Stevenson, Unit- in Havana..
-. . -.3

CS.

I:
.*. .. .

w
v
?lam
t

TUESDAYS-
9:15 A.M. Holy Communion.
WEDNESDAYS-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)-
FRI DAYS-
12:10 Holy Communion followed by lunch
at the Canterbury House.
WEEKDAYS-
5:15 Daily evening prayer.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.

/I

he VIRGINMN
RESTAURANT
315 South State NO 3-3441
Eat out this weekend. Better yet, try an individually
prepared dinner at The Virginian. The following
dinners will, we think, suit your taste and your
pocketbook:
SPECIALLY PREPARED DINNERS
(Friday, Saturday, Sunday)
ROAST PRIME RIB OF BEEF, Au Jus,
Whipped Potatoes, Vegetable

--
..' V

Destined for a summer
of casual goodtimes
..,cotton chambray deck
pants and jamaicas
in beige and white.
Coordinated with
matching popover top
embroidered with
maypole border.
Sizes 3.15.

11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m.Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age.)
11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age).
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00
MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH
411 Fountain St.
Rev. Wm. F. Nicholas, pastor
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
Training Union 6:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 7:30 p.m.
Prayer Meeting Wed., 7:30 p.m.
Cooperating with the Southern Baptist
Convention.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
10:00 A.M. Bible'School
1 1:00 A.M. Regular Worship
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY- d
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
THE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061
Church School 10:00 A.M.
Morning Worship 11:00 A.M.
CAMPUS CHAPEL

PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue.
NO 2-35 80
Jack Borckart,' Campus Pastor
Wn. S. Baker, Patricia Pickett, associate
pastors
Sunday, May 21
Services: 9:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 11:50 a.m.
Sermons: 9:00 a.in and 11:50-Rev. Malcolm
Brown "Be Aglow with the Spirit"
10:30 a.m.-Rev. David Van Winkle "The /
Instinct of Preservation"
CAMPUS CENTER
Sunday, May 21
11:30 a.m. Student CoffeeHour in French
Room
4:30 p.m. "Key Concepts of the New Testa-
ment," 217 S. Observatory Pat Pickett
7:30 p.m. 2nd Merrill Lecture of 1961. Rev.
John E. Burkhard, Ph.D.'"The Right to
Be Wrong" Held in the Curtis Room
Tuesday, May 23
9:00 p.m. "Coffee and Conversation with Pat"
217 S. Observatory
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street and South Forest Avenue
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
Phone NO 8-7622
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m. Worship Service
11:00 a.m. Worship Service & Holy Communion
7:00 p.m. Speaker: Dr. V. H. Miesel, History
of Art instructor, "Contemporary Religious
Art"
THURSDAY
7:15 p.m. Vesper Service
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Sermon: "The Work of Reconciliation," Rev.
Eugene Luening
Adult Discussion: "How to be a Councilman"-
Lyn Eley ,
Student Group: 7:00 p.m.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
Unitied Church of Christ
423South Fourth Avenue
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Orville H. Schroer, Parish Minister
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. Worship service
7:00 p.m. Worship program, 524 Thompson
NORTH SIDE PRESBYTERIAN
CHAPEL
2250 Fuller Road (Opposite V.A. Hospital)
NOrmandy 3-2969
10:45 a.m. Morning Worship
CommunionI
Church School and Child Care Provided
Minister: Dr. William S. Baker

FIRST- METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY. FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets Tel. NO 8-688
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister -
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
9:00 and 11:15 a.is. Morning Worship. Co
r ditions of Discipleship '(6) THE THIR
TEENTH DISCPILE-YOU. Sermon by D
Rupert
10:15 Seminar: "Skeptic's Corner,' "Whc
Christian Doctrine is untenable?"
5:30 Fellowship Supper
7:00 Worship and Program. Open discussic
on the program of Wesley Fellowship,
Wednesdays
7:00 a.m. -Holy Communion, Chapel, followe
by breakfast in 'the. Pine Room.' (OverI
time for 8:00 classes)
Fridays-
5:30 p.m. Wesley Graduate Student Fellov
ship dinner followed by program. Pine Root
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
502 East Huron
Rev. James H. Middleton, Minister
Rev. Hugh D. Pickett, Assistant Minister
SUNDAY-
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship-"Our World
God's World," Rev. Hugh D. Pickett preacF
ing.
6:45 p.m. Meet at Campus: Center to he
guest speaker, Professor George Mendenha
speak on "Biblical Faith"
8:00 Redlands Drama Trio will present ti
play "Lower than Angels"
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Arthur Dauer, Vicar
SUNDAY
9:45 and 11:15: Worship Services, Sermon l
the Pastor, "That Selfsame Spirit." (Hc
Communion in both services)
9:45 and 11:15: Bible Study Groups
2:30: Meet at Chapel for Joint Outing for MS
and UM Gamma Delta Chapters .
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00 Sunday School
8:45 and 11:00 Morning Worship
"Purged by Fire"
5:30 Student Guild
5:45 Youth Groups
7:00 Evening Service-
"The-Meaning of Guilt"
i Wednesday
7:30 Prayer Meeting
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCI
YMCA Building, 350 S. 5th
Guest minister, the Rev. Chester Postma, pas
of Third Reformed Church of Kalamazc
Michigan
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURC
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.

I

Jamaicas ...
7'1 T 7'1 _

$5.98
~" ^ ^ %w1

11

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister

11

I- MT~ .I I /la LL....fn 7 an~

I

lilt

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