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May 20, 1961 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MAY 20, 1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MAY 20, 1

PROFILE: JON TROST

Architect Cites Problems
Of Delhi's Urbanization

FACULTY POSTS:
Regents List Appointments

are brought to the public eye
quicker than the contributions."
There is lots of publicity for
errors, but "contributions, as is
perhaps natural, go unnoticed."
It may be that people "expect
groups of fraternity caliber to be
good," and are surprised when
they aren't.
The area in which fraternities
are now receiving a very great
deal of national attention is mem-
bership selection policy. "With
time, there will be a substantial
change insmembership policies of
fraternities," Jon says, but it i'
overoptimistic to think the morals
and attitudes that determine
membership selection can be leg-
islated.
Personal Values
"In a question of personal values
such as choice of associations and
friends, change has to evolve by
means of that undefined and neb-
ulous term, education."~
With regard to written clauses,
however, Jon expects continued
progress. In 1946, he points out,
there were about 20 fraternities
here with "arbitrary regulations
in membership selection." Now
this number is down to a very
few.
Handling of the sticky member-
ship selection at the University
has been "as creditable as at any
place," Jon says. "We've been able
to do it without time limits, which
speaks well for the University's
attitude" on the question.
Direct Concern
The direct concern of Student
Government Council a n d its
Committee on Membership Selec-
tion in Student Organizations is
compliance with University regu-
lations by local chapters, Jon says.
Membership policies on other cam-
puses are not "immediate con-
cerns."
If a local chapter's policies are
questioned, it will have to seek an
exemption from the national.
However, Jon says that a broad-
er future goal of both locals and
the membership committee is to
work "toward abolition of arbi-
trary limitation in the national
fraternity organizations."
Favor Clauses
This kind of change is accom-
plished through "lobbying and
agitating at national conventions
... I believe that national can do
it through discussion and debate
... .It's a process of getting to-
gether and talking with the
South" whose chapters continue
to favor the clauses.
It's a fact. Jon points out, that
the North is more progressive in
human relations than the South,
"but it took the North a long time
to get here." It is unfair, there-
fore, to expect the South to change
"just like that."
As a Sigma Chi brother, Jon
has had experience working at na-
tional conventions to change some
of his fraternity's policies.
'Little Alternative'
If the answer to a waiver request
is no it is "most likely the local
will have little alternative than to
withdraw, or find themselves no
longer recognized by the Univer-
sity," Jon says.
The chapter can be recognized
as a local organization, probably
with a new name, but this is un-
fortunate because its voice has
beenremoved from the national's
policy-making apparatus, and it
can no longer work for policy
changes.
Jon hopes that, if any chapter
has to go local, it will do so with
a readiness to rejoin the national
when the national's policies are
compatible with the University
regulations.
More Aware
Making fraternity men more
aware ofssuch problems has, in
Jon's eyes, been one of IF's
greatest accomplishments this
year.

Jon got out his petition for IFC
president to assess his own ac-
complishments, as compared to
initial expectations. Going down
the list, he indicated a lot has
been done in many of the areas,
but of course there were still more
things to do. He says that, per-
haps, a measure of success in an
office is to be able to look back at
the end and see things that might
have been done that weren't.
Jon's plans for next year are
firmed up: study at the Univer-
sity of London under the Univer-

By MARTHA MacNEAL

IS

JON TROST
... fraternities changing
sity's London scholarship plan.
Beyond that, he is unsure, but his
choices, law, teaching, govern-
ment work, reflect his undergrad-
uate work in political science, in
which he took honors work.
He regards his experience both
in IFC and SGC as contributing to
his knowledge of politics, "which
deals in effect with people and
the relationship of people in so-
ciety." His experiences-"a liberal
education"-have helped him to
learn about the political process of
compromise.
Middle-of-the-Road
On SGC, Jon's position could
best be described as middle-of-the-
road. However, he did not go along
with the Council members who
wanted to express opinions on a
wide range of outside social and
political questions.
Jon questions whether the Coun-
cil can have the facts to make
such judgments..
The Council, however, has a
real role in expression of student
opinion "from the point of view
of an interest group" at the Uni-
versity, he says. In all expressions,
it must be remembered 18 people
are speaking, not the entire stu-
dent body.
Jon's personal interests were
wide-ranging, from reading of all
varieties, to singing, parties and
athletics. He admits playing foot-
ball with his Sigma Chi brothers
isn't the easiest thing in the
world. "It's rough, you better be-
lieve it."

The problems of urbanization
have made Delhi one of the most
explosive cities in Asia, architect-
planner Albert Mayer said Thurs-
day night.
"Urbanization is especially rap-
id in the underdeveloped coun-
tries," he explained, an4 Delhi's
urban redevelopment project, be-
gun in 1957, came "perhaps some-
what too late." Mayer's lecture,
"The Regional Master Plan for
Delhi, India - A Pioneering Ef-
fort," was sponsored by the South
Asian studies department and the
research seminar in quantitative
economics.
In 1947, the partition separating
Pakistan from what is now India
caused "a cross-migration of Hin-
dus to India and Moslems to Pak-
istan, resulting in significant pop-
ulation growth in India. Migra-
tion from rural areas was very
intensive, and became a serious
factor in Delhi.
Becomes Center
Delhi, changing from a colonial
outpost to a world center, became
the capital of a pronounced wel-
fare state with a sharp increase
in government services. The pop-
ulation doubled within a decade.
It became a desperate, crashing
sort of situation that reached a
crescendo."
Mayer said that "the quick
measures of an urban planning
project that can be taken are
medical, but other processes are
slow, such as economic develop-
ment and the institution of fam-
ily planning."
Delhi was chosen for a Ford
Foundation planning project "be-
cause it is the traditional capital,
the center of emotional allegiance,
and a natural line of communica-
tion. It is composed of four or
Panhellenic Group
To Study Election
The election study committee to
evaluate the Panhellenic election
procedure has been chosen.
Nancy Nassett, '63, will be
chairman. Other committee mem-
bers include Diane Haight, '62,
Martha Melvin, '63, Susan Smith,
'63, Margo Mensing, '63, and Su-
san Brockway, '63.

ALBERT MAYER
..describes Delhi

five cities in both origin and prac-1
tice. The old, walled city, estab-
lished by the Moguls, contains the
most refugees.
Greater Population
Population density is greater in
effect, though not in actuality,
because the buildings are at most
only two or three stories high. The
area near the University, called
"civil lines" because the British
used it as a civil center, is a
semi-suburb. The New Delhi area,
set up by the British in 1912, was
a country-club operation that had
to be changed.
The fourth area is comprised of
army posts, and many refugees
are housed in various outlying
areas. Thus the city is really a
series of separate situations, May-
er emphasized, "and the problem
is how to make it into one city
without destroying the individual
character of each part."
"In the old walled city are
slums, machine shops and repair
shops, with human, residential, in-
dustrial, and commercial situa-
tions that must be unravelled. Ur-
ban living conditions are inade-
quate, so squatters often live for
five years or more in shacks by
the highways. The squatters de-
layed construction of a major
road, but nobody had the guts to
get them out.
Underdeveloped countries offer
the opportunity to be more crea-
tive," Mayer said.

The following appointments and
leaves of absences were approved
by the Regents Thursday. ,
Ray P. Ferguson of Oberlin Col-l
lege was appointed assistant pro-1
fessor of Organ in the School ofr
Music.-
Ned A. Flanders has been ap-f
pointed to professor of education.
He is presently on the faculty of
the College of Education at thei
University of Minnesota.
Arthur J. Field was appointed
assistant professor of sociology at
Flint College.
Frederick B. Llewellyn, assis-
tant to the president at Bell Tele-
phone Laboratories was appointed
research physicist in the Institute
of Science and Technology for the
period from Sept. 1 1961 to June
30, 1962.
Marvin H. Stevens, major in the
United States Marine Corps was
appointed assistant professor in
the department of naval science.
The Regents also filled vacant
committee positions. Professors
Joseph N. Payne and Lowell Beach
were appointed to the Executive
Committee of the School of Educa-
tion for three year terms. They
will succeed Professors William C
Morse and W. Robert Dixon whose
terms will expire shortly. William
B. Crawford, alumni member of
the Board in Control of Inter-
collegiate Athletics whose term will
expire on May 31, was named to
complete the term of the late
Louis B. Hyde.
LSA Group
Recommends
Exam Change
The literary college steering
committee is sending a letter to
the college's evecutive committee
recommending an extension of the
final examination period.
They are recommending two
alternate programs to utilize this
time. The first is a six day "read-
ing period" in which the student
could study and integrate from
all his courses.
The other is for a three day
"reading period" followed by a
staggered exam schedule. A major-
ity of the committee favors the
latter plan.

p I

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The Regents approved changes.
in status of two members of the
Medical School faculty. Associate
Prof. Robert J. Belt of the depart-
ment of internal medicine will
change from three-fourths time to
full time. William A. Gracie, Jr.
will change from one four to three
fourth time as an instructor of
internal medicine.
Chairman Wyeth Allen of the
department of industrial engineer-
ing was granted sabbatical leave
for , the second semester of the

1962-63 academic year. Herbert H.
Alvord, professor of mechanical
engineering, was granted leave
without salary for the academic
year 1961-62
Leaves without salary were
granted to six members of the
College of Literature, Science and
the Arts faculty for the 1961-62
academic year. Sheridan W. Baker
of the English departmeni was in-
vited to serve as a visiting pro-
fessor at Nagoya University in
Japan.

DIAL
NO 8-6416

I m

Continuous
Today
From 1 P.M.

SPEAKS TO EDITORS:
Ferguson Urges Students To Enrich Language
4,

"TOP-GRADE SUSPENSE"
N.Y.World-Telegram & Sun
A1UE0 FU.M MAKERS orur
~ JACK HAWKINS,.
NIGEL PATRICK
ROGER LIVEREY
RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH
0 MOAK Et fPaInd BASHl. PAAROEN
?,oducbmt
THlE LEAGUE OFGEgFLEMEfI
E AGU BRYAN FORBES OIEON MOORE-ROBERT COTE

By MICHAEL OLINICK
A senior editor on the world's
most widely read magazine urged
1,300 high school editors yester-
day to use the English language
with "enjoyment and love."
Charging that the language
"suffers from massive and organ-
ized neglect," Charles W. Fergu-
son, an occasional lecturer in the
department of journalism, cited
a common task to preserve and
enhance the written and spoken
word.
Ferguson's address, "Love That
Language," keynoted the 34th
Michigan Interscholastic Press
Association Convention, which was
sponsored by the journalism de-
partment. High school newspaper
and yearbook staff members at-
tended the main sessions and
"short courses" in journalism
techniques.
Challenging the dictum that
"one picture is worth 10,000
Notices
Grad. Outing Club, Canoeing, May 21,
2 p.m., Rackham Bldg., Huron St. En-
trance.
S* e
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, May
22, 3-5 p.m., FB.
Wesley Fdn., "What Christian Doc-
trine Is Untenable?", 10:15 a.m., Pine
Rm.; Fellowship Supper, 5:30 p.m., Open
discussion on the Program of Wesley
Fellowship, 7 p.m., Wesley Lounge;
May 21.

words," the editor warned that
"you can't simply worship that
nonsense without regard for the
right word. One word, if the cor-
rect one, can be well worth 10,000
pictures."
The Texas born journalist trac-
ed the growth of the language
from Samuel Johnson's 18th cen-
tury dictionary which had only
58,000 entries and today's un-
abridged word lists with 600,000
entries.
"This growth has intimidated
people. They are urged to use only
the minimum 10,000 word vocab-
ulary and stick to simple phrases.
The people, however, aren't as
dumb as the public thinks."
Lists Suggestions
Ferguson listed several practical
suggestions to master the lan-
guage, but cautioned that it is a
job which must be done on an
active, individual basis. His sug-
gestions included:
-Regain a sense of rhythm.
Ferguson claimed that a great
many reminders of rhythm are
gone. He urged the student editors
to sing and to practice writing with
a metronome in the background.
He cited his personal remem-
brances of singing hymns while
handmilking cows and used ges-
tures to illustrate how one might
accomplish the latter while ren-
dering "Onward Christian Sol-
diers."
Suggesting that students might
find the King James Version of the
Bible the best "writer's handbook,"
Ferguson said that all prayer-

books had fine examples of
imagery and cadence.

vivid

Offers Advice
He suggests:-use of old words'
in new ways. "The language is
changing today and not altogether
to the worse," Ferguson said,
showing modern use of such ar-
chaic terms as "destined" and
"significent."
-Use metaphors. Ferguson ad-
vanced the idea of adopting the
vocabulary of one field, like cook-
ing or medicine, for a week and
selecting 011 one's figures of speech
from that word group.
-Invent your own verbs--"Verbs
can make or break a style," he
said, emphasizing that a "sentence
pivots on a verb."
League Announces
Committee Posts
The Women's League has an-
nounced the members of its sum-
mer school committee. They are
Nancy Kingsland, '63N, president,;
Michelle Sellars, '63N, social chair-
man; Alison Williams, '63N, pub-
lic relations; Mary Rainaldi, '62M,
Jean Merkle, '62N, and Joyce
Peterson, '63, judiciary members.

Ferguson asked his audience to
"get over you fear of grammar.
Grammar should be looked at as
a set of engineering principles,
used to advance communication."
Beneficial Practice
Creating verbs out of nouns is
a beneficial practice for the sum-
mer months, at least, Ferguson
said. "It keeps the mind alive,
though it may not impress your
boss."
-Learn rhetorical devices. Fer-
guson stressed two oratorical
tricks: prolexus and predirition.
An important one is "leaping
ahead and disarming your oppon-
ent by anticipating his argument."

ob.

U U

DIAL
2-6264 9

I

ENDS TONIGHT
ESTHER WILLIAMS
in
:THE BIG SHOW"

1

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M NU J I'dr'
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A MODERN
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