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May 16, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUE9DAY MAY,,,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, MAY

AYN RAND:

Author Tells of Man's Nature

EXPERIMENT:
Local School Receives
Airborn TV Programs

By RISA AXELROD

11

"It is the nature of man that he
must use his mind to survive," au-
thor Ayn Rand said Sunday before
her speech on "The Aesthetic Vac-z
uum of Our Age," sponsored by the
Michigan Union's Creative Arts
Festival.
"The whole concept of values}
depends on the existence of a liv-
ing entity endowed with choice.
Since man can survive only by
the choices that he makes, he must
know what constitutes right and
wrong and on what standard to
base his choices," she explained.
Prefacing her remarks by stating
that her philosophy of objectivism
could not be briefly summarized,
Miss Rand outlined this concept
of "rational self-interest" which
she advances in her most recent
book, "Fbr the New Intellectual."
Value System Necessary
"A system of values is an in-
herent necessity of a living entity,"
she said.
"What is right for man is that
which is proper to a rational be-
ing, and it is on this that he should
base his morality. For,that which
is irrational is anti-life and can
destroy man by damaging his ca-
pacity to use his mind.
"The rational man will not be
forced into betraying his values;
he realizes that the value of his
struggle is the achievement of an
ultimate goal."
Thoughtful Identity
Miss Rand states that man must,
identify his values-by means of a
process of thought. With the rec-
ognition of these values, "man has
the right to live for his own happi-
ness, in other words, for his ra-
tional self-interest."
Emotions follow as the result of

"If guided by reason, emotions
can be one's best friends. For it
is only the fully rational man who
will feel strongly about anything.'
"If a man is convinced that he
is right and can prove his case, he
can feel profoundly, but will never
feel emotions of guilt."
Miss Rand believes that it is
honesty rather than courage which
allows a man to remain true to his
convictions about what is right
and wrong.
Social Values
While a dishonest man might
believe it is "easier and safer" to
agree with society rather than
hold his own ideas, he destroys
himself by betraying his values
and accepting the values of others.
"The most dishonest act that
one can perform is to say that the
opinions of others are more im-
portant than one's own," she em-
phasized.
"The man who says 'I can't
judge for myself' wants others to
take the responsibiilty of judging
for him. He is more afraid to de-
cide for himself than of what so-
ciety will do to him if he does
make a decision."
Miss Rand explained that Na-
thaniel Branden is giving a series
of lectures in New York and other
cities which are devoted to a pres-
entation of her philosophy and
that there seems to be a growing
interest in objectivism.
Miss Rand is the author of suen
books as "Atlas Shrugged," "The
Fountainhead," "Anthem," "We
the Living" and "For the New In-
tellectual."
Her lecture was the only public
appearance she would make while
in Ann Arbor.

RICHARD SOUTHERN
... theatre revolution

- AYN RAND
=. . author, philosopher

value premises, she believes. If
value premises are held rationally
there is no conflict, but if value
premises are held unconsciously, if
a man does not know why he holds
certain values, a conflict will re-
sult.
"Reasons and emotion are not in
conflict," Miss Rand stated. Emo-
tions are the result of thinking or
of evasion; in the latter by absorb-
ing values through a type of os-
mosis, she said.

Views Stage
In History
By FREDERICK ULEMAN
Georgian theatre design is a
combination of Elizabethan and
court theatre features, Richard
Southern of the British Centre of
the International Theatre Insti-
tute said yesterday at a speech
department lecture.
Prior to the English restoration,
there had been two major kinds of
theatres: the Elizabethian theatre
with its square stage projecting
into the audience, and the court
theatre with its recessed scenery
area.
Christopher Wren, after having
been asked to build a new style
theatre, first designed a polygoni-
cal shaped auditorium with a
square stage protruding into the
audience. This theatre was never
built.
The theatre he finally did build
had a large fan - shaped stage
which extended back and had
scenery behind it.
'In this candlelit theatre the
actor stood in front while the
enclosed area provided an air of
mystery behind him.
If necessary, he could walk into
the fantasy effect of the back
stage. However, a more intimate
and confiding atmosphere was ini-
tiated by having the actor on the
front of the .stage.
It was only the advent of gas
lighting, which replaced the ex-
pensive candles and made it pos-
sible to have the audience dimly
lighted with the stage and scenery
well illuminated, which signalled
the end of the Georgian theatre
and the start of the Victorian era.
CAF To Present
Dance Program

By PHILIP SUTIN
Approximately 120 students at
Ann Arbor's Wines Elementary
School participated yesterday in a
six-state experimental project in
airborne transmission of educa-
tional television programs.
A specially equipped DC-6 cir-
cling Muncie, nd., transmitted the
lessons to schools in Indiana, Illi-
nois, Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky
and Wisconsin in the Midwest Pro-
gram on Airborne Television's first
day of experimental classroom
broadcasting.
In Ann Arbor students viewed
three of the taped programs.
Classes View Show
A sixth grade class watched an
arithmetic program on decimals
and fractions and a science pro-
gram while three second grade
classes viewed a taped lesson on
spring plants.
"The sixth graders first attitude
was 'well this is something like
we have at home'," Emerson Pow-
rie, principal at Wines School said.
"As the program progressed, they
became involved and got the idea
this was different than a typical
program."
The University is one of the four
participating universities in Michi-
gan. Each institution will consult
with the school systems using the
airborne television programs on
educational and technical prob-
lems.
Workshops Held
Like the other institutions,
Michigan State University, Wayne

LITTLE CLUB UNDER THE STARS . . . FRIDAY, MAY 19 . 9-12
I 6
'-

State University, and Western
Michigan University, the Univer-
sity will hold a workshop this sum-
mer to instruct teachers in the use
of this program. The session to be
held Aug. 7-18 will feature video
tape demonstrations concerning its
effective use.
"This is an experimental pro-
gram to find the best benefits of
this type of teaching. This is sup-
plemental instruction just the
same as audio-visual aids," John
Elzay, Ann Arbor superintendent
of schools explained.

i

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
presents
Shaw's "DON JUAN IN HELL"
Wed. & Fri., May 17, 19
Dante's "INFERNO"
Translation by JOHN CIARDI
Thurs. & Sat. May 18, 20
8:30 P.M. First Unitarian Church
Admission: Wed., Thurs. $1, Fri., Sat. $1.25
Series: Wed. & Thurs. $1.75, Fri. & Sat. $2.00
Reductions to DAC members & groups of 10
Tickets on sale at Marshall's Book Shop

"Oh joy, the Little Club's
dance is going to be out in
the open air !"

"Just think . . We'll
have the fresh, clean air
to breathe, and flowers,
and--"

"Oh well, it's air-con-
ditioned inside!"

:I

FACULTY GRADUATES:
Professors Audit, Continue Classwork

1961 DRAMA SEASON * Gala Opening Tonight
"A COMIC TRIUMPH !"
-N.Y. Times

A

By ANN GOLDSCHMIDT
For most students, a University
degree offers emancipation from
further courses, but some en-
thusiastic faculty members persist
in auditing classes long after re-
ceiving their doctorate.
Professors sit in on classes for
a variety of reasons. Some find it
a stimulating way of finding out
more about their own field. Others
are more interested in learning
about an area totally unrelated to
their own specialty. Still others
find a particular course will help
them in a specific research pro-
j ect.
Foreign language courses are
among the most popular. Profes-
sors intending to travel or teach
in another country or those need-
ing to do research in reading a
foreign language audit beginning
WUOM Gets
USIA Prize
The University, through it radio
station WUOM-FM, has been
awarded a "Certificate of Partici-
pation" by the United States In-
formation Agency recognizing its
contribution to the Voice of Amer-
ica.
Henry Loomis, USIA director of
broadcasting services, commended
the station for presenting taped
messages in which foreign stu-
dents tell their families and friends
at home about their lives at the
University.
Pledges To Hold
Camp Help Week
Junior Panhellenic and Junior
Inter-Fraternity Council will spon-
sor Help Week, beginning tomor-
row through Friday.
All pledges and initiates from
sororities and fraternities will go
to the Fresh Air Camp and begin
maintainance work so that the
area can be used for camping dur-
ing the summer. Buses will leave
the campus at 1:30 and return at
5 p.m. each day.

language courses to further their
proficiency.'
Eastman Audits Course
Prof. Arthur Eastman of the
English department audits Prof.
Joe L. Davis' course in American'
literature. Prof. Eastman will be
teaching American literature on
a high school level via "airborn"i
television next year, and is in-
terested in seeing how another
teacher handles the material. He
also finds Prof. Davis' 'sociologi-
cal" approach to literature stimu-
lating.
John Nystuen of the geography
department' is taking several
courses in basic mathematics that
are applicable to some research he
is doing.
But there are other faculty
members who are taking courses
just for the fun of it.

find they don't have the time.
Instead, they audit several lectures
without attending the class regu-
larly. One professor said it would
be impossible for him to attend
a class regularly since he is fre-
quently called out of town to lec-
ture or attend conferences. He also
complained that if he took courses
outside his own field he would be
labelled a "dilletante" by his de-
partment and considered less ser-
ious about his own area of con-
centration.
Suggest Cooperation
Another professor suggested that
more faculty members take courses
in other departments to further
interdisciplinary cooperation. He
stressed the lack of collaboration
among related departments in the
University.
The advantages of faculty mem-
bers auditing courses also include
a widened insight into the nature
of being a student. Most profes-
sors prefer not to participate in
the class discussions, but even so
find a new outlook on the prob-
lems of faculty-student relation-
ships.

JOHN
BARAGREY

FAYE
in EMERSON

"T HE MA RRIAGE-GO-ROUN D"
A Comedy Dedicated to the Proposition
with
LYNNE FORRESTER
and
STEPHEN ELLIOTT
Evenings through Saturday at 8:30 P.M.
Matinees Thursday and Saturday at 2:30 P.M.
Box Office Open Daily 10 A.M. - Curtain Time

John Baragrey

Faye Emerson

SEASON TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE

GOOD SEATS FOR ALL PERFORMANCES

LYDIA MEN DELSSOH N THEATRE

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This evening at 8 at Hillel
HONORS NIGHT and INSTALLATION OF OFFICERS
Speaker:
Dr. Lawrence B. Slobodkin
1961 Recipient, Henry Russell Award
"Speculations on Peck Order in Jews"
Refreshments
1429 Hill Street All are welcome

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Mass Meeting
CnaDNCMnW

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