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May 16, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICBIGAN DAILY

L 1) 11111

PM

GE THE

_. ..CHIANDALY E il

Rea

ch Laos
Rebel Si

Compromise

Co UR T DECISION:
Bar Catholic Tuition Aid

eat

at

PRICE RIGGING:
SEC Sets
'Fix' Probe
Of Market
WASHINGTON (P)-The gov-
ernment yesterday ordered a
broad, secret investigation of the
American Stock Exchange, rock-
ed recently by allegations two
prominent members engaged in
wholesale price-rigging and other
violations.
The two members, Jerry and
Gerard Re, were ordered expelled
from the exchange on May 4 by
the Securities and Exchange Com-
mission, which announced the new
inquiry.
SEC officials said they will try
to determine whether new laws or
regulations are needed $o protect
investors against the type of mar-
ket chicanery attributed to the
Res. They were exchange special-
ists conducting daily auctions in
about 20 stocks.
The exchange, second largest
in New York City and the na-
tion, has announced reforms to
prevent Re-type operations. The
Res' activities extended from 1954
until early 1960.

SOVIET THREAT:
Seek French Atom Test

GENEVA UP) - The Soviet Gov-
ernment demanded yesterday that
the United 'States and Britain get
the French to stop testing nu-
clear weapons before the Soviet
Union is forced to resume its own

testing of atomic and hydrogen
arms.
Soviet delegate Semyon K. Tsa.-
apkin read a formal government
statement into the snarled three-

Senate To Open Aid Debate;
May Tie NDEA to Education

WASHINGTON (JP)-The Senate
opens debate on federal aid to
education legislation today with
backers of the measure in some
disarray-if not a state of confu-
sion.
Democratic leaders, on the eve
of the debate, still were conducting
delicate negotiations seeking the
best possible strategy to win final'
passage of the legislation.
But some Senate backers of the
bill privately expressed the fear
that the strategy move now receiv-
ing the closest consideration might
well end up by losing votes for the
long-disputed bill.
To Link Bills
This strategy would be to tie
the $2.55 billion general School Aid

JO1HN UI ILIBRICIHIT
of Majorca
OILS on Canvas and Paper
Only Showing in Michigan
May 1-19
201 Nickels Arcade NO 3-091g

Bill, on which debate begins today
to another measure extending and
broadening the 1958 National De-
fense Education Act.
The general bill contains no
funds for private schools. The De-
fense Education Act does and un-
der the plan being considered this
aid would be beefed up. The theory
is that such a move would meet at
least in part the so-far fruitless
demand of Roman Catholic offici-
als for inclusion of private schools
in the general bill.
Senate Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont) told newsmen
yesterday the idea of tying the two
bills together┬░ still was being dis-
cussed seriously. He said a decision
might be reached today or tomor-
row.
Doubts Quick Passage
Mansfield said he doubted
whether the bill could be passed
before next week in any event.
This would give the Labor Com-
mittee time to get the Defense
Education Act measure to the floor
if it acted quickly.
The education subcommittee
completed rush hearings on this
legislation Saturday.
But Sen. Wayne Morse (D-Ore),
Education Subcommittee chair-
man, told reporters today he would
be very surprised if his group
favored tying the two bills to-
gether. He said he had no plans
to sponsor such a move.
The general bill calls for $2.55
billion in grants for public grade
and high schools over the next
three years.

power nuclear
record saying
stitutes a "
United Natici
jeopardizes a
ban treaty wh
to here.
Tsarapkine
two Westernp
a previous S
cerning the"
test series, an
"This mayf
erment to re
clear and hyd
Tsarapkin
Arthuf H. De
Wright of Br
statement to
ments. Then
Western pow
ranged the M
pensate for
has been in e
here began o
Dean andE
that charge. T
it when the te
March 21, alE
first French;
the Sahara.
Heads
May4
WASHINGU
tion that Pre
nedy may me
Premier Nik
mounted last
sian ambassac
Kennedy toda
The White
sador Mikhai
cated he had
to the Presid
close its natu
Neither t
the State Dep
ulate on the:
munication, p
Kremlin. Nor
from the Sovi
contents of th

Geneva
U.S. Agrees
End On 3 Groups
test ban conference At Meetings
French testing con-
gross violation" of To Test Sincerity
ns resolutions, and To esSncrt
ny world-wide test Of Moscow Words
hich might be agreed
GENEVA (M)-The United States
expressed regret the agreed to seat the Pathet Lao in
powers failed to heed the 14-nation conference schedul-
oviet warning con- ed to start here today, four days
"unjustified" French late.
d concluded: The United States gave way on
force the Soviet gov- a procedural tangle in hope of
esume testing of nu- testing the sincerity of Soviet
Irogen bombs." Premier Khrushchev's peaceful
asked U.S. delegate pronouncements on Laos.
can and Sir Michael On instructions from President
itain to forward the John F. Kennedy, Secretary of
their home govern- State Dean Rusk reluctantly
he accused the two agreed to a new big-power com-
vers of having at- promise on who would speak for
ench tests to coin- Laos at the meeting after earlier
the test-stop which agreements had been rejected by
effect since the talks the Laotians themselves.
ni Oct. 31, 1958. Still Object
Sir Michael rejected The representatives of Laos'
Tsarapkin first raised pro-Western government still ob-
st ban talks resumed jected to the compromise, but
nost a year after the Britain and the Soviet Union, co-
atomic explosion in chairmen of the Conference, an-
nounced it will start this evening
anyway.
The announcement said the
of State co-chairmen would seat "represen-
tatives from Laos" proposed by
other delegates.
CionferThis avoids giving the pro-Com-
munist Pathet Lao rebels the stat-
us of a governmental delegation,
TON (JP) - Specula- but it still puts them on an equal
sident John F. Ken- footing with the other two fac-
eet soon with Soviet tions-the Vientiane government
ita S. Khrushchev and the rebels' allies, a self-styled
night when the Rus- neutralist group supporting Prince
odor arranged to see Souvanna Phouma who is recog-
Ly. nized by the Communists as the le-
House said Ambas- gal premier of Laos.
1 A. Menshikov indi- Only International Aspects
a message to deliver The announcement indicated
ent but did not dis- the conference would deal solely
re. with the international aspects of
he White House nor the Laotian crisis-securing the
)artment would spec- country's military neutrality and
nature of the com- the problems of arms control.
presumably from the It will not concern itself with
was there any hint the political aspects of what sort
et Embassy as to the of government will run the coun-
he message. try.
U1T~ in th air th lp vce

WASHINGTON (R)-In an ac-
tion with nationwide implication,
the Supreme Court yesterday let
stand unchanged a decision bar-
ring use of public funds for tui-
tion payments to Catholic schools.
The Court made no comment
and gave no indication its vote
was other than unanimous.
It merely announced in a brief
order its refusal to review a deci-
sion by the Vermont Supreme
Court. That decision held such tui-
tion payments violate the First
Amendment which guarantees re-
ligious liberty and separation of
church and state.
Butler Airs Implications
The implications of the case in
the light of the present controver-
sy over federal aid to private
schools were pointed up by Paul
M. Butler, former chairman of the
Democratic National Committee.
Butler represented parents, most-
ly Catholics, who wanted the Ver-
mont decision overturned.
In asking a review, Butler de-
scribed the case as one presenting
"a federal question of important
and current substance," and infer-
entially mentioned President John
F. Kennedy's contention that
across-the-board aid to Catholic.
schools is unconstitutional.
Butler said the executive branch
and many members of Congress,
"as a result of their understand-
ing of previous decisions of this

WASHINGTON {A}-The House
Appropriations Committee yester-
day trimmed $2.18 million from
the Labor Department budget but
added $48.15 million to funds
recommended for the Welfare De-
partment.
Noting what it called "a thriv-
ing black market in babies," the
committee said the government
should devote more attention to
"the plight of unwed mothers in
the teenage group and their child-
ren."
The committee also urged in-
creased federal attention to the
problems of hospital bills, infant
mortality, job training, medical
research, and the aged sick.
It recommended a total of $4.33

billion for the Labor and Health
Education and Welfare Depart-
ments and related agencies for the
fiscal year starting July 1.
This was $45.31 million more
than President John F. Kennedy
requested. Kennedy asked $285.29
million for the Labor Department,
and lesser sums for several smaller
agencies.
Biggest single increase voted by
the committee, in sending the bill
to the House for debate Wednes-
day, was in funds for the National
Institutes of Health. The coin-
mittee added $58 million to the
President's request of $641 million
for this agency, to spur research
in mental and physical health.

court," have concluded that any
form of direct payment of public
funds to a sectarian school vio-
lates the First Amendment.
Failure To Clarify
"The court's failure to clarify
or reverse the decision of the Ver-
mont Supreme Court cannot help
but strengthen such official con-
viction of the constitutional limi-

tations on the power of Congress
to provide aid for sectarian
schools," Butler said in his ap-
peal papers.
The Vermont litigation grew out
of tuition payments by the South
Burlington Town School District,
which has no high school of its
own. for its students to attend oth-
er public or private high schools.

f

C7

-1i

IWorld News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-President John
Kennedy was reported by New
week magazine yesterday to1
considering wartime wage ar
price controls.
The magazine said he plans1
prepare the nation for specific sa
rif ices in a second state of tl
union message to be delivered ne
week.
CHICAGO-Six retired militai
leaders and a former president
the American Bar Association sa
yesterday they have urged Pres
dent John F. Kennedy to resun
nuclear tests immediately.
WASHINGTON - The Sena
yesterday passed by voice vote
$12.5 billion authorization bill f
the nation's major military weal
ons system including $525 milli
more than President Kennedy as]
ed for manned bombers.
* * *
SAO PAULO-Portuguese Ge
Humberto Delgado said yesterdo
a government in exile will be s
up soon in Europe or Africa wit
the aim of toppling Premier Ar
tonio Salazar.
WASHINGTON-Fellow unio
officials yesterday charged
headquarters group in the Bake:
and Confectionery Workers Unic
with widespread expense accou
padding to cover up an earlier a
leged fraud.
United States District Judge E
ward A. Tamm ordered a hearin
Wednesday on the new charges it
volving officials of the scanda
rocked 70,000-member union, e)
pelled from the AFI-CIO mo
than three years ago for allege
corrupt domination.
* * *
ALGIERS-French authoariti
yesterday assured Algeria's en
bittered European settlers the
they will be consulted about ti
North African territory's future

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It's made of nylon power net
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Has rayon, nylon, rubber and
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Committee Cuts Budget
Of Labor Department

k
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4. ,
4.
4,
4'

C.
a.
MODERN DANCE,
RECITAL
TONIGHT at 8
Trueblood Auditorium
rnrr

up in te air was tie question
whether the pro-Western repre-
sentatives would attend the con-
ference. But Vientiane's minister
of the interior is en route to Ge-
neva to head the delegation and
he mayrdecide to go ahead and
take part.
U.S. Locates Sites
Of Soviet Missiles
WASHINGTON W) -- United
States military leaders believe
they know the locations of 37
Soviet missile-launching pads, in-
cluding one less than 500 -miles
from Alaska.
And they figure the Russians
have 35 to 50 long-range war
rockets ready to shoot.
At least 10 of the reported mis-
sile pads have been identified as
launch sites for the Soviet Union's
8,000-mile-range T3 missile, which
carries a thermonuclear warhead.

r
t
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I

a

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
announces

PETITIONING for

2

STUDENT MEMBERS

COMMITTEE ON MEMBERSHIP IN
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Petitions and detailed information about the Committee are now available
offices of Student Government Council, 1 st floor, Student Activities Building.

at the

PETITIONS ARE DUE MONDAY, MAY 22nd AT 5.P.M.
The Committee consists of 4 student members appointed for one year terms and 3
non student members appointed for 2 year terms. The Committee advises Student
Government Council on the enforcement of the following regulation (adopted in May,
1960.):
"All recognized student organizations shall select membership
and afford opportunities to members on the basis of personal
merit, and not race, color, religion, creed, national origin or
ancestry."
For further information contact:
DICK NOHL, President of Student Government Council, NO
3-0553, NO 2-3256.
PER H-ANISflM Fxpr1~1 iitiv Vi-IPrprhon NO t1RR NtM :i q

,

I

11

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