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May 07, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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PAGE THLREEZ

i

SKhruslichev

Warns

U.S.

To Keep Peace with Cuba

LIVE SHOW:
Sailors Watch Space. Flight

Aboard the Lake Champlain atE
Sea, A)-If the Russians have any
doubts that the U.S. shot a man
into space Friday and brought him
back alive, let them ask 2,600
GI's
That many sailors and officers
of this big aircraft carrier were
eye witnesses to history from
choice seats.
In contrast, according to Rus-
sian reports, only a couple of
farmers were around when their
first astronaut came down from
the skies.
Soviet'.Premier Nikita S. Khrush-
chev yesterday messaged con-
gratulations to President John
F. Kennedy on the space flight of
Cmdr. Alan B. Shepard Jr.
"The latest outstanding achieve-
ment in man's conquest of the cos-
mos opens up unlimited possibili-
ties for the study of nature in the
said.

ASTRONAUT-Crew members of the carrier Lake Champlain
cheer spaceman Alan Shepard, Jr. as his capsule is picked up.

PEACE CORPS:
Primitive Conditions Await Workers

Addresses
Armenian
]Parliament
Expresses Optimism
Over Future Events
MOSCOW Jp)-Soviet Premier
Nikita S. Khrushchev a g a i n
threatened Soviet aid yesterday if
Cuba is attacked.
He assailed United States policy
and called for the United States
to deal with Cuba on a "live and
let live" basis. Khrushchev did not
mention missile aid for Cuba but
said in a speech to the Armenian
Republic Parliament in Yerevan:
"If the United States imperial-
ists, contrary to common sense,
should fling it into another undis-
guised venture against the Cuba
republic, that would entail serious
consequences, above all for the
United States itself. The imperial-
ists can no longer get away with
their ventures today.
Khrushchev noted that the at-
tack had been repulsed and add-
ed: "We should like to regard
optimistically the further develop-
ment of events in this area of the
globe. The people expect the. Unit-
ed States government leaders to
draw correct conclusions and learn
the necessary lessons from what
has happened."
In an allusion to the Soviet
decade-long campaign to wipe out
NATO, SEATO and similar alli-
ances, Khrushchev said:
"The Soviet Union wants to see
all military alignments abolished
so that international disputes
could be resolved by peaceful
means, through negotiations as
well as through the United Na-
tions."
The Soviet Premier said those
who are anxious to see peace pre-
served in Laos must welcome the
14-nation conference scheduled to
open Friday in Geneva.
He charged that the troubles in'
Laos followed American efforts to
divert that Southeast Asia coun-
try from its neutrality status es-
tablished by a Geneva agreement
in 1954.
"Laos wants to use its energies
for peaceful purposes," he said.
"The Western powers should ab-
stain from using Laos as an area
for military intrigues."

Government
To Enforce
Civil Rights
ATHENS, Ga., (A) - Robert F.
Kennedy, making his first major
address as Attorney General, told
a Georgia audience yesterday civ-
il rights statutes would be vigor-
ously enforced.
He spoke at the University of
Georgia, where students rioted
last January when two Negroes
were admitted.
Won't Threaten
Kennedy said the federal gov-
ernment would not threaten but
would try to help bring about ob-
servance of civil rights statutes.
"We will not persecute, we will
prosecute," he said.
"We will not make or interpret
the laws. We shall enforce them
vigorously without racial bias or
political slant.'
Challenges South
Kennedy appealed to all sec-
tions to breathe meaning and
force into law. He said the South,
perhaps more than any other sec-
tion, has the opportunity, chal-
lenge and responsibility of dem-
onstrating America "at its full
potential for liberty under law,"
"We just can't afford another
Little Rock or New Orleans," he
said.
Kennedy said that civil rights
is one of "the three major areas
of difficulty ... that sap our na-
tional strength, that weaken our
people, that require our immediate
attention."
Ministers Ask
Segregation
ATHENS, Ga. OP) - Five holi-
ness Pentecostal ministers dem ' -
strated against integration yes-
terday but police arrested them
before United States Atty. Gen.
Robert Kennedy arrived to make
a speech at the University of
Georgia.
They paraded on a sidewalk just
outside the university arch. They
had a banner reading "Read the
Bible. The Bible teaches segrega-
tion."

WASHINGTON (2) - President
John F. Kennedy's 1961 legisla-
tive program has begun to gather
momentum on Capitol Hill but the
toughest battles are yet to come.
With the session now four
months along with perhaps anoth-
er three months to go, Congress
has completed action on eight of
the 16 points Kennedy submitted
to his party's legislative leaders
shortly after he took office.
Education Aid
However, the most controversial
of his 16 points remain to be acted
on. Foremost in this category are
federal aid to education and a
health care program tied to the
social security system.
In addition, the President has
sent to the Capitol eight or 10
other major 'measures since the
16-point list was drawn up in
February.
At least two of these supple-
mentary measures, tax revision
and omnibus farm legislation, are
sure to cause lengthy disputes.
Major Bills
The two major bills signed into
W oarldNews
Roundup
By The Associated Press
TOYKO - Red China's new
agency yesterday criticized Presi-
dent John F. Kennedy's decision
to send Vice-President Lyndon B.
Johnson on a visit to Southeast
Asia.
"Johnson will be the third top
United States official to come to
the Far East for conspiracies in
a short period," the agency said.
TEHRAN, Iran - Ten thousand
students and teachers marched
through Tehran's streets yester-
day screaming "butchers" and
"savages" to protest police firing
on a teachers' sit-down strike.
NEW YORK--Eggs were thrown
at the headquarters building of
the Soviet Delegation to the United
Nations yesterday from the midst
of about 300 anti-communist Cu-
ban and Hungarian demonstrators.

law by Kennedy so far, depressed
areas aid and broadening of min-
imum wage, are included in the
"big five" measures he stressed
before he took office.
A third one of these, a proposed
expansion of federal housing pro-
grams,.has been cleared so far by
the Senate Housing Subcommit-
tee.
The other two of the five are
the health care plan and federal
aid to education.
A drive is on in the Senate to
attach the health care proposal
to a Social Security liberalization
bill already passed by the House.
Supporters of this plan say they
have the votes to do it. However,

KENNEDY PROGRAM:
New Bills Face Controversy

it is uncertain whether House con-
ferees would accept it.
Meanwhile, the House Ways and
Means Committee announced Fri-
day plans to hold hearings late
in the session on the bitterly dis-
puted health care legislation.
The labor committees in both
branches have held extensive hear-
ings on grade and high school aid
legislation.
A Senate subcommittee may ap-
prove a school bill on Wednesday
or Thursday; that branch is to
act first on the floor. The Senate
seems sure to pass it. The House
outlook is discouraging.
Aside from school aid and health
care, there are six bills on the 16
points not yet passed.

U

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Made tot
of your in
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face powde
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Consultant,

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BY WHITNEY SHOEMAKER
Associated Press Feature Writer
WASHINGTON -- In the inter-
ior of Nigeria, it is said, the newly
arrived American can expect to
get dysentery within two weeks.
Expect Filth
in avillage of Senegal, .by the
account of a recently returned
government official, visitors can-
not avoid living with flies and filth.
These are conditions facing the
Peace Corps, President John F.
Kennedy's project for neighborli-
ness among nations.
They are not, of course, typi-
cal of every town or back coun-
try state in which the Peace Corps
volunteers will serve.
Subtle Disease
Peace Corps officials are also
concerned with more subtle di-
sease - such as frustration or
blind anger - which may infect
the corps' recruits. Still they are
sure the corps will not only sur-
vive, but succeed.
To some critics, the Peace Corps
is a mammoth boondoggle, a melo-
dramatic gesture to extend the
New Frontier to Timbuktu, as Rep.
H. R. Gross, (R. Iowa), protested.
To others, it is idealism floating
on clouds.
To the Communists, it is a cold
war spy corps, a tool of aggres-
ion.
To the Daughters of the Ameri-
can Revolution it is an expensive
mistake for both the nation and
its youth.
Assault on Poverty
To its advocates, the Peace Corps
is. an exciting assault on poverty
the world over, a 20th century
exposition of the golden rule, an
honest effort by common men to
better one by bettering all.
Some men who have served the
government abroad are frankly ap-
prehensive. They like the idea, but
they wonder whether the response
is impulsive or well thought out.
Everyone connected with the
Peace Corps agrees that good in-
tentions are not enough.
Peace Corpsmen must be chosen
for their skills. This means their
ability to build a schoolhouse in
Malaya, or to teach in it, or to pro-
vide sanitary facilities for the
townspeople, or to train farmers
to "conserve soil.
Peace Corpsmen must know the
language of the country sufficient-
ly to pick up the dialect of the
particular people they serve. They
must know the history and tradi-
tions of their own country in or-
der to represent it intelligently
abroad.
Army Safer
Sargent Shriver, director of the
Peace Corps, has said life in the
Armed forces may be more glam-
orous and safer.
"This is not going to be a moon-
light cruise on the Amazon, or a
pleasant vacation in Kashmir, or
a very nice opportunity to go out
to the Far East," Shriver said at
a youth conference here.
The President, in creating the
corps, warned of physical hard-
ship, primitive conditions and fi-
nancial sacrifice.
Peace Corps literature glows
it will accomplish for others: "The
withi word pictures of what good

volunteer can help to raise stan-
dards of living ..." and for him-
self: "He will be enriched by the
experience . . I
Still it does not intend to delude.
Pioneer Life.
"The volunteer must be prepared
to live a pioneer life, the Peace
Corps fact book states.
Some "might prove to be emo-
tionally inicapable of facing the
realities of living in distant out-
posts," it says.
In other words, if you're not
durable physically and mentally
-forget the whole thing.
Shriver, and all those around
him, have insisted that the Peace
Corps is not venture into diplo-
macy or propaganda. Its work is
to be its appeal.
Tanganyika was the first coun-
try to invite and be accepted. Civil
engineers, geologists and surveyors
will work side by side with Tan-
ganyikans on farm - to - market
roads. By midsummer, agreements
will be concluded with 10 to 12
other governments.
Volunteers will stay abroad for
about two years. They will get no
pay except allowances enabling
them to live on a scale comparable
to the men and women with whom
they work. On leaving the corps,
they will receive severance pay
of something like $75 a month. A
career planning board will help
them find jobs at home.

Corps men will be deferred from
the draft. After separation, their
deferment may be prolonged as it
is now for many youths occupied
in teaching, science or govern-
ment.
The cost has been estimated at
$10-12,000 per man per year, or
anywhere from $3-10 million the
first year. A corps of 5,000 would
cost $50 million.
College presidents polled by the
American Councilon Education
solidly endorsed the Peace Corps
but a majority felt the government
should permit them to select, train
and handle the placement of vol-
unteers overseas. That is fine with
the corps.
As for the multitude of visible
and invisible details involved in
its enterprise, the corps can put
to use the experience gained for
many years by private and non-
profit agencies which have plowed
the field of international assist-
ance on a man-to-man level.
Work Camps
Summer work camps h a v e
brought in Americans and others
since 1920 to help Europeans build
homes and harvest crops. The In-
ternational Voluntary Service has
long sponsored such projects. So
have the American Friends Serv-
ice Committee, International Farm
Youth Fxchange and numerous
groups supportedI by churches and
other institutions.
See CORPS, Page 5

the measure
idividual skin.-
hand-blended
r by Charles of
reated by ou
as you watch

a face powder to flatter and
match your complexion
made-to-order in
pressed compact or
loose powder box,.
Have one of each,for.
purse and dress
ing table. $2.00
each, plus tax.
' =

U of M Folklore Society and Creative Arts Festival
A Concert of Folk Music with
JACK ELLIO0TT
FRIDAY, May 19, 1961 -8:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION BALLROOM
TICKETS ONLY 90c
On Sale at: Union, Disc Shop, Hi-Fi & TV Center

m i

... .

I

-1

ALL
RECORDS
STER1EO and HI FE
/2 price
when you buy a second Angel LP at the some list price.
I./i. ii i....... i.. i..........//......
Complete Catalogue Including:

1961 1962
Presented by the University .Mu sical Society in Hill Auditorium

I

s
DOWN ETOWN

CHORAL UNION SERIES,
GEORGE LONDON. Wed., Oct. 4
Metropolitan Opera Bass
ROGER WAGNER
CHORALE. . . Thurs., Oct. 19
First Ann Arbor appearance'

EXTRA. SERIES

24

HIGH FASHION ..
HIGH QUALITY...
GREAT VALUE...

* MAZOWSZE . . . Tues., Oct.
Polish songs and dances, with orchestra

THE CLEVELAND
ORCHESTRA . Thurs.,
GEORGE SZELL, Music Director
RUDOLF SERKIN Mon.,
Pianist of world renown-tenth:
here

Nov. 16
Nov. 27
appearance

BOSTON SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
.* . .(2:30) Sun., Oct.
CHARLES MUNCH, Music Director

22

Schwartzkopf
Cal-las
Von Karajan

Eileen Farrel
Pablo Casals
Schnabel

BERLIN PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA . .. Fri., Nov. 3
HERBERT VON KARAJAN, Music Director
* BAYANIHAN . . . Mon., Nov. 6
Music and dances from the Philippines

Soviet Army Chorus Klemperer
Dennis Brain Gieseking
Fischer- Dieschau Oistrakh

YEHUDI MENUHIN
(2:30) Sun., Nov.
Violinist's seventh Ann Arbor recital
GALINA VISHNEVSKAYA

12

DISC SHOP TiV (ENTER
1210 S. Univ. 304 S. Thayer
NO 3-6922 NO 5-4855

. . . . . . . . Tues., Nov. 21
Soprano of the Bolshoi Opera, Moscow
EMIL GILELS . . Tues., Feb. 13
Russian virtuoso pianist
MINNEAPOLIS SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
.. . . . (2:30) Sun., Mar. 4
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI,
Music Director
* AMERICAN BALLE'.
THEATRE . . . Sat., Mar. 24
Company of 100, with orchestra

BOSTON "POPS"
TOUR ,ORCHESTRA
. . . . (2:30) Sun., Feb. 18
ARTHUR FIEDLER, Conductor
LEONTYNE PRICE Mon., Mar.12
Metropolitan Opera soprano
Ticket Information
CHORAL UNION SERIES
$20.00-Block A. Few remaining unclaimed
seats in the three center sections on both
$17.00-Block B. Two side sections on both
Main Floor and ini First Balcony, front to rear.
$15.00-Block C. Top Balcony, first 8 rows.
Main Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$12.00-Block D. Top Balcony, 9th to 16th
rows.
$10.00-Block E. Top Balcony, last 5 rows.
EXTRA CONCERT SERIES
$10.00-Block A. Three center sections on both
Main Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$8.50-Block B. Two side sections on both Main
Floor and in First Balcony, front to rear.
$7.50-Block C. Top Balcony, first 8 rows.
$6.00-Block D. Top Balcony, 9th to 16th rows.
$5.00-Block E. Top Balcony, last 5 rows.

DELIS
SPRING Si
Reg
yles r.

deb
TYLES
90.
pr.
gularly 18.95

TWO-TONE PL
in Bonnieskin-
one of many sty

I

9

campus Spectacular.. .
PETITIONING OPEN for
"MICHIGAN PREVIEW"

Entire stock of Deliso deb
spring styles to choose from
plain pumps... pumps
with ornamentation of leath-
ers or ornaments . . . high
heels and mid-heels ,

I

Orders for season tickets for either or
both series will be filed in sequence. Orders

, i .

SINGLE CONCERT TICKETS-r-Beginning Septem-

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