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May 07, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SN

IUNDA!

RTS AND LETTERS:
1893 Error Helps 'Festival'
1.

Student's Rocket Design
Uses Detonation Waves

I

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'I

By RISA AXELROD

If it hadn't been for a misunder-
standing, a premature statement
and an economy measure, May
Festival might never have come
into existence, University Musical
Society President Charles A. Sink
says. .
The Society, organized in 1879,
presented five concerts per season
for 11 consecutive years. In 1890,
and for the next three years, the
Society -decided to bring the Bos-
ton Symphony Orchestra to play a
climax performance to its Choral
Union series..
In the fall of 1893, however,
after announcing that the Boston
Symphony would again appear, the
board. of directors discovered that
the orchestra would not be able to
play here.
Following much discussion, for
"in those days there weren't many
touring orchestras," the Society
elected to bring the Boston Festi-
val Orchestra to Ann Arbor.
Three Concerts
"A good, but not well-known
orchestra," Sink says, the Boston
Festival Orchestra was booked to
play three concerts instead of one.
This was done to draw in larger
box-office receipts in order to pay
for the traveling expenses of the
orchestra.
And so, in the spring of 1894
when the three concerts were pre-
sented, and called the May Festi-
val, a tradition was born that has
continued for 68 consecutive years.
Recalls Story
Sink recalls the story he was
told of this first May Festival.
ACWR To Ratify
New Contsitution
Members of Americans Com-
mitted to,- World Responsibility
will meet tomorrow at 7:30 p.m.
in Rm. 3G of the Union to ratify
their constitution and elect next
year's officers.

"In those days there weren't
many big events, and widespread
publicity throughout the state of
Michigan brought out-of-towners
into Ann Arbor in crowds."
"Travel, of course, was consider-
ably slower than now, but the rail-
roads ran special trains with spe-
cial rates to accommodate people
coming to the Festival."
University Hall
The Festival was held in Univer-
sity Hall, a building which stood
where Angell Hall stands today
and which seated approximately
2,200 people.
"The festival drew many more
people than had been anticipated
and the hall was packed to ca-
pacity until people overflowed into
corridors and lobbies."
In 1910 the fire department de-
clared University Hall unsafe for
the large crowds that filled its
auditorium during the Festival.
Arthur Hill, then a member of
the Board of Regents, realized the
need for a larger auditorium.
To Construct
A few years, later, when Hill
died, he left $200,000 to construct
a building which would house fes-
tivals and other University func-
tions.
It was decided that the new
auditorium should seat approxi-
mately 4,500 persons and as a re-
sult the University had to secure
$150,000 more in order to begin
construction.
New Building
Before the new building had been
dedicated, in the spring of 1913,
its auditorium was initiated with
the May Festival of that year.
"In moving the concert to Hill
Auditorium, nobody, in the most
optimistic mood, thought we would
fill it up," Sing, then executive
secretary of the Musical Society,
recalls.
"I ordered tickets for the whole
building anyway. I never will for-
get that time. We sold 2,000 sea-
son tickets and later people came
from everywhere to buy individual

concert tickets to fill the auditor-
ium to capacity."
Every Festival
"People said it was just because
the auditorium was new and
everyone wanted to see it, but from
that time on every festival has
sold to capacity."
Since that eventful year of 1913
the number of concerts per year
has increased from three to six.
In addition, the size of the stage
has been increased, and the organ
has been rebuilt, allowing greater
numbers of performers to appear
on stage at once.
Many prominent musicians and
orchestras have appeared in the
festival over the years. The Phila-
delphia Orchestra has appeared
every year since 1936.
Always Impressed
"Performers are always im-
pressed by both the auditorium
and the quality of the audiences
before whom they play," Sink says.
"Although we like to think that
the May Festival provides enter-
tainment, its prime purpose is to
expose students who come here
from varied communities, to good
music."
"Students are especially respons-
ive to the perfection which the
composer and the performer has
been striving towards."
Organization
Notices
Folk Dancers, Meeting, Constitution-
al Amendments will be voted on, Danc-
ing &. Instruction, May 9, 7:30 p.m.,
Community Center. For transportation
call NO 3-2085 after 5:30 p.m.
Gamma Delta,. Lutheran Student
Club, Supper, Rev. Aurich will speak
about Walther, May 7, 6 p.m., 1511
Washtenaw.
Graduate Outing Club, Canoeing with
instructions, May 7, 2 p.m., Rackham
Bldg., Huron St. entrance.
* * *
Hillel.Fdn., Supper Club, Followed by
Social. Dancing, May 7, 6 p.m., G1ick
Social Hall.
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, May
8, 3-5 p.m., 3050 FB.'
Lutheran Stud. Assoc., May 7, 7 p.m.,
Hill & Forest. Speaker: Dr. R. W.
Heyns, Dean, College of LSA,."Religion
& Psychology."
Wesley Fdn., "If God is God, Then is
He Good; If God is Good, Then is He
God?", 10:15 a.m., Pine Rm.; Fellow-
ship Supper, 5:30 p.m., Film, "The
Sound of a Stone," 7 p.m., Wesley
Lounge; May 7; Film: "Family Living,"
May 8, 7:30 p.m., 1st Meth. Church,
Green Rm.
I ,

TRIO-Angel Reyes, Gui Mourbaerts, Dudley Powers
PROGRAM NOTES:
May Festival ToClose
oWith WarfieldIstomin

Gary L. Cosens, Grad, has de-z
veloped the theoretical design of
a new rocket engine that utilizes
detonation waves to burn fuels
faster at higher temperatures and
produce considerably more thrust
than current engines.
For years, engineers have had to
contend with these waves in rocket
engines. When they occur at ran-
dom because of design defects,
their extra heat can literally slice
the engine apart like a cutting
torch.
But in Cosens' engine, fuel is
oxidized in a detonation tube, and
the resulting wave travels in a
circular path around the combus-
tion chamber.
Produces Thrust
This produces enough thrust so
that a rotating detonation engine
with the same power as the Atlas'
300,000 pounds thrust would be
only one-third the size of the Atlas
engine.
Cosens used data on detonation
waves obtained by Prof. William B.
Sommers of the aeronautical and
astronautical engineering depart-
ment, who did the research for his
doctoral thesis with support of the
Institute of Science and Technol-
ogy.
"One big advantage of this en-
gine is that you would be able to
'size' the system," Cosens said. It
is not possible with current en-
gines to design for a particular
thrust level.
Cheaper
The engine would also be
cheaper, because it would require
a shorter development time.
- l

He said that a vehicle with this
engine could be guided by varying
the pressure within the engine by
a slight amount rather than hav-
ing to turn the engine. In other
words, the rocket would turn be-
cause the engine would "push
harder" on one side than the other.
Cosens predicted that if research
and development projects were run
simultaneously, the rotating deto-
nation engine could be made op-
erational in two years.
Gothic Film Society
EARTH
(dir. by Doyzhenko,
Russi.-Ukrania, 1930)
and
THE ROUNDERS
(Charlie Chaplin and
Fatty Arbuckle, U.S.A., 1914)
Monday, May 8, at 8 P.M.
in Rackham Amphitheatre.
Only those holding member-
ship. subscriptions are admit-
ted. Subscriptions to the two~
remaining films of the series
cost $1.00. For further in-
formation, call NO 2-6685
or NO 2-9359.

DIALNO 5-6290
THAT
SHAGGY n
GUY
INVENTS
A NEW
FORMULA
FOR FUNI
1
e I

Y
TH
ID-"...w

It

11

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S.G.C.
Cinem ul
TONIGHT at 9
TH E SWAAN
(COLOR)
with Grace Kelly, Alec Guinness,
Louis Jourdain
SHORT: PUCE MOMENT
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

The May Festival will close to-
day with two concerts. William
Warfield, baritone, will sing the'
lead in Mendelssohn's "Elijah,"
assisted by the Choral Union and,
the Philadelphia Orchestra at
2:30 p.m. in Hill Aud.
Pianist Eugene Istomin will
play an all-Rachmaninoff concert
at 8:30 p.m.
NU Trio
The Northwestern University
Trio is slated to present a public
concert at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in
Rackham Lecture Hall.
The program will include "Trio
in E major K 542" by Mozart,
"Trio in A minor" by Ravel, and
"Trio in B major Op. 8" by
Brahms.
Shakespeare
Continuing his discussion of
"The Plays of Shakespeare," Prof.
Arthur Eastman of the English de-
partment will speak on Henry IV,
Part I at noon today on WWJ.
'U' TO sponsor
Hospital FWeek
Beginning tomorrow through
Friday, more than 200 civic,
school, and industrial leaders will
visit the University Medical Cen-
ter as part of National Hospital
Week.
Chairman of the Hospital Week
activities is Robert W. Spencer,
an administrative resident.
The guests will have lunch at
the hospital and then tour select-
ed areas in the Medical Center.
Mayors, police and fire chiefs
and civil defense directors will
visit the emergency suite and the
areas equipped to monitor and
treat radiation accidents. They
will examine the Medical Center's
preparedness to handle major dis-
asters.
Principals and administrators
of public and parochial schools in
Washtenaw county will tour the
teaching facilities in the hospi-
tal.
These special programs will re-
place the usual "public open
house" which has been held each
year at the Hospital.

The problem of guilt as seen in
children, criminals and all people
is the subject of a discussion on
the University Television series
"Understanding Our World."
The discussion by a psycholo-
gist, a psychiatrist and a lawyer,
will take place at 9 a.m. today on
WXYZ.
I'

DIAL
NO 2-6264

Shows at
5:00 -7
Feature a
5:20 - 7
Now!

I

m HIR I N Y

if

COMING FRIDA
"GONE WI
THIEWIk

Continuous
a DIAL
TODAY *DA
NO 8-6416
from 1 P.M
"A JOLLY GOOD SHOW INDEED"-Time Magazine
~" Brood Humors"
TEK~ Tw"-N Y Tms
Next Highly
'"BREATHLESS" RecommendedI"

--- --

ALL.inKO
gJff ROBJ~iSN fWIIR1RG6[S" O RMERN

1:00 -2:55
:00 and9:00
at 1:25-3:20
:25 and 9:25

I/

Hemingways
THE OLD MAN
AND THE SEA
SPENCER TRACY
and
COLLEGE
CONFIDENTIAL
Steve Allen Jayne Meadows
Walter Winchell Mamie Van Doren

I

I

I

Larry Parks

Faye Emerson

Donald Cook

Nancy Kelly

1961 ANN ARBOR DRAMA SEASON

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--
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Heads ... It's 7:00!

Tails

. . . It's 9:30!

But either

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.."
_.* '
" *
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"4 f +
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way

it's the

Men's Glee Club
SPRING CONCERT

COUNTER SALE OF SEASON TICKETS
OPENS TOMORROW,10A.M.
5 Plays * Recent Broadway Comedy and Dramatic Hits 5 Weeks
FAYE EMERSON and JOHN BARAGREY in "The Marriage-Go-Round"-May 16-20
NANCY KELLY in "The Bad Seed"-May 23-27
ALBERT DEKKER in "A Touch of the Poet"-May 30-June 3
LARRY PARKS and BETTY GARRETT in "Send Me No Flowers"-1June 6-0
DONALD COOK in "The Pleasure of His Company"-June 13-17

for me!

Tues. thru

#
*4"
4
*

Season Ticket Prices
Thurs. Eves. $15, $13, $11. Fri. and Sat. Eves. $17,
Thurs. and Sat. Mats. $12, $9
Box Office Hours: 10 A.M.-5 P.M.
Single Tickets Do Not Go On Sale Until May 12
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

$15, $13

HILL AUDITORIUM
Saturday, May 13

Betty Garrett

Albert Dekker

Ann Summers

John Baragrey

I

Tickets available at Ad. Bldg. Ticket Window

~Q. 00A XA 00 PKA

0

m

.:.:. .

._

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