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May 05, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-05-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

EBATE INTENT:
Council Considers Motion on Daily

IN ANN ARBOR:
Language Experts Meet
To Discuss Peace Corps

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is the complete discussion of the
committee of the whole at Wed-
nesday's student Government
Council -on the motion' expressing
concern over the apparent trend
towards irresponsibility in Daily
articles.)
By JUDITH OPPENHEIM
James Yost, '62, introduced a
motion at Wednesday night's Stu-
dent Government Council ex-
pressing "grave concern over the
apparent trend towards irresponsi-
bility in news reporting and edi-
torial comment in The Daily."
Nine members spoke during the
35-minute committee of the whole
discussion of the motion. Intro-
ducing it, Yost explained that the
tone of his motion was intended
SGC Views
Peace Corps
By THOMAS HUNTER
A motion asking Student Gov-
ernment Council to endorse the
idea of a peace corps and to in-
d icate the belief that the Peace
Corps should eventually come un-
der the sponsorship of the United
Nations was discussed Wednesday
"night.
The motion, co-sponsored by
Acting Daily Editor John Roberts,
'62, and Kenneth MEldowney,
62 will be voted upon next week.
It was discussed in committee-
Sf-the-whole Wednesday. Council
rules require one week's delay be-
tween presenting and voting on a
motion expressing student opin-
ion.
The motion also asked SGC to
"agree that the beliefs of Ameri-
cans sent abroad cannot be di-
rectly contrary to the principles
of democracy and the government
of the United States, to oppose
the use of loyalty oaths and affi-
davits," and to oppose the use of
security clearances in selecting
members of the corps.
Alan and Judith Guskin, Grads,
both leaders in the Peace Corps,
were guest speakers. Alan Guskin
is former spokesman of Americans
Committed to World Responsibil-
ity, the campus peace corps or-
ganization.
Mrs. Guskin explained that part
of the objection to security clear-
ane was, that. individual appli-
cants might object to investiga-
tions because of a suspicion the
Federal Bureau of Investigation
seems to have toward students
and because foreign'nations will
view the program as an American
spy plot.
"What we should really be con-
cerned about is how mature these
people are-whether or not they
really know what's going on in the
world," Mrs. Guskin said.
"Much more effective than a
security check would be someone
working with the applicants for
six months. If some suspicion re-
mains, then they might be turned
down."~
She said that the basic reason
for objecting to loyalty oaths was
that the peace corps is not poli-
tical.
The individual must not neces-
sarily agree with the politics of
our government, Mrs. Guskin
pointed out, but he should know
it and be able to defend it when
called upon.
Roberts said that the peace
corps idea should appear before
the United Nations this summer.
"The ultimate objective is a fully
international program. At the
present time I doubt if the United
States would allow its program to
be taken over completely by the
'U' Teachers

Take Awards
Five University professors were
among 265 winners of the John
Simon Guggenheim Memorial
Foundation fellowships.
The winners were Prof. Martin
Dyck, of the German department.
Prof. Edward Glaser and Prof
Edward B. Ham, of the Romance
language department and Prof
Francis C. Evans and Prof. Law-
rence B. Slobodkin, of the zoology
department.
West Quadrants
Choose Members

to be positive. "This is not a con-
demnation of The Daily," he said.
Yost said The Daily ought to
be working "to improve the image
of the University, the students and
itself in the eyes of the adminis-
tration, faculty and alumni." In
fulfilling this function, he said,
The Daily often leaves much to
be desired.
Unfair Expression
He believes the irresponsibility
stems from factors including mis-
quoting and from unfair editorial
expression. "I don't mean to strike
out against freedom of editorial
expression," he emphasized. "I
don't care what is said. I am
concerned with how it is said."
Yost thinks that in several in-
stances this year The Daily has
violated the stipulations of "calm-
ness, fairness and intelligence'"
which appear in the 1940 version
of the Code of Ethics.
[e repeated that his motion was
intended "to draw the attention of
The Daily to the fact that many
students are concerned about the
opinions stated in the newspaper."
Also Concerned
Roger Seasonwein, '61, said he
too is very concerned about The
Daily. He said he is concerned
with the fact that the newspaper's
margin of profit has declined con-
siderably over the past few years.
He said he is also concerned with
difficulty The Daily is experienc-
ing in maintaining an adequate
staff, and he is especially con-
cerned "that the job The Daily is
doing now might be stopped."
Seasonwein believes The Daily
has made many mistakes this
year. "Nevertheless, I think the
trend, instead of being toward ir-
responsibility is away from it."
Criticizes Motion
Seasonwein criticized Yost's mo-
tion as vaguely worded and neg-
lecting mention of specific articles
or editorials. "If I thought The
Daily's policies were irresponsible
or unduly slanderous, I would vote
in favor of this motion," he said.
"But if I thought the paper was
merely carrying out astrong,
forthright policy. I would point
out instances where it was wrong
and then compliment as well as
criticize."
8easonwein spoke in favor of
The Daily's articles on the quad-
rangle situation and its work to-
ward University non-discrimina-
tion legislation.
Acting Daily Editor John Rob-
erts, '62, also criticized the vague
wording of Yost's motion. He said
the motion implies that The Daily
is not aware of its own shortcom-
ings. Actually, he said, The Daily
is very critical of itself and knows
that it often makes mistakes.
Not Unique
These mistakes, however, are
not uniquely The Daily's but oc-
cur in every newspaper due to the
speed with which articles must be
written, judged and cut.
Roberts admitted that some in-
dividual stories which have ap-
peared in The Daily were undoubt-
edly irresponsible. But hedoes not
believe that isolated instances
constitute a trend. Roberts said
the motion will certainly be inter-
preted as an attempt to censure
The Daily even though the maker
of the motion may not have in-
tended it as such.
Michigan Union President Paul
Carder, '62, agreed with Yost that
the motion does not imply con-
demnation. He said the motion
should not cite specific instances
of irresponsibility because this
would constitute tampering with
freedom of the press.
Cite Scheub Report
He did say, however, that the
handling of the Scheub report on
the quadrangle system was irre-
sponsible because it made parent
doubt the wisdom of sending in-
coming freshmen into the quads
He said the recent editorials or

the Union were "obviously in poor
taste and misstated and consti-
tuted a personal attack which was
out of order."
Kenneth McEldowney, '62, said
The Daily is not exhibiting a
trend toward irresponsibility. He

emphasized the importance of
self-criticism to The Daily, ex-
plaining that a criticism sheet is
written for each morning's paper
"which is often five or six single-
spaced typewritten sheets in
length. "The Daily notes and
analyzes its mistakes very care-
fully," McEldowney said.
Philip Power, spec, expressed
concern over the intent of the
motion. The underlying intention,
he believed, was to gratify per-
sonal grievances.
He said those who objected to
specific Daily articles ought to dis-
cuss their opinions with staff
members, but that bringing such
a vaguely worded motion to the
Council was not an effective way
to handle the situation.
John Martin, '62, disagreed with
Power, saying that the motion is
constructive and "is not intended
as a vehicle for expression of per-
sonal gripes."
Arthur Rosenbaum, '62, said
The Daily's actions were definite-
ly of concern to the Council but
that the motion as presently
worded is too vague. He believes1
specific instances of irresponsibil-
ity should be cited.
Rosenbaum believes the prob-
lem with The Daily are not mis-
takesbutrdefinite policies. He
said coverage of men's rush was
deliberately underplayed and that
recent Union coverage has been
unfair.
Seasonwein agreed that The
Daily was a legitimate concern of
SGC but objected that vague'
terms like "irresponsible" are
highly defamatory because they
are so general.
He suggested that the Council
should simply ask The Daily a
series of questions in regard to
its policies.
Brian Glick, '62, agreed that
freedom of the press is violated
when vague charges are made and
not backed up with specific ref-
erences. He said he hopes for a
listing of individual violations by
the next meeting.
Inter-fraternity President Rob-
ert Peterson, '62, said that several
'instances of irresponsibility had
already been pointed out. He said
fraternity presidents have fre-
quently been misrepresented and
that concern about The Daily's
reporting had "filtered down"
through the fraternity system.
AADAC Plans
New Picketing
The Ann Arbor Direct Action
Committee will stage a special
picketing of S. S. Kresge stores
from noon to 2:30 p.m. tomorrow,
as part of a renewed effort at eco-
nomic boycott of the chain.
An AADAC policy statement
said the committee, affiliated with
the National Congress on Racial
Equality, was "intensifying the
boycott because the lunch coun-
ter situation in Deep South stores
has retrogressed in the past
month."
The report claimed a store in
the New Orleans metropolitan
had reverted to segregated serv-
ice.
tAlpha Delta Phi
To Host Chapters
The University chapter of Al-
pha Delta Phi social fraternity
will host seven other chapters for
its second annual Midwestern re-
gional conference, today through
Sunday.
Lr

HON. SHAUL RAMATI
... denounces Eichmann

Asks Israel{
For Justice
By MALINDA BERRY
"It would be a travestry of jus-
tice and a mockery of law to pre-
vent such a man as Adolph Eich-
mann from being subjected to due
process of law," the Hon. Shaul
Ramati, Israeli Consul in Chicago,
said at a speech sponsored by the
Michigan Union international
committee Wednesday.
It is irrelevant to speak of the
purpose of the trial, because there
is no alternative than for the law
to run its proper course, Ramati
said.
"The concept of vengeance is
absurd, almost unthinkable. How
could there be any possible retri-
bution for the murder of 6,000,000
people? There is no way he could
be made to pay."
Significant Trial
Ramati noted, however, the
trial was significant. It will serve
to keep humanity at large from
forgetting the slaughter.
"Totalitarianism is now devel-
oped to a frightening height never
before reached. Because of new
weapons, drugs and even thought-
control systems, the possibility of
genocide is greater than ever be-
fore," he explained.
"If we are to hope to protect
humanity we must tell people how
genocide could happen even in the
20th century world. And we must
make sure it is not forgotten."
Great Impact
The trial also has a great impact
upon Israel as a state, because
some of the younger Jews, the ones
who never suffered from the
Nazi's cannot realize how the
European Jews could accept the
treatment without active struggle.
The younger Jews must realize
that all Jews were a part of the
Jewish tragedy, he said..
"Also, if the whole story is
really known, no one, not even
the most remote crackpot in Ger-
many or anywhere else would
want to associate themselves with
something as revolting and dis-
gusting as the Nazis."
The blame for the Jewish per-
secution cannot be shirked by any-
one. The consulates who denied
visas to the Jews who applied for
them, even when they knew denial
meant death for those Jews, must
accept their share of the blame,
Ramati said.

By CAROL ISACKSON
Methods of coordinating a pro-
gram for teaching of languages to
Peace Corps members were dis-
cussed at an Ann Arbor confer-
ence of language authorities ear-
lier this week.
"It is a stated policy that all
Peace Corps members should have
an effective knowledge of the tan-
guage they will be required to use
in the countries to which they are
sent. Whether a representative
goes to India or to Iceland, it is
inevitable that he will be speaking
a foreign tongue," Prof. Albert
Marckwardt, of the English de-
partment and chairman of the
conference said.
Because some languages are not
as well-known as others few v1-
unteers will have the required
language ability without special
training. There mst, therefore be
time alloted for a language train-
ing program with qualified, willing
teachers, he said.
How Much Swahili?
"It's a matter of how much
Swahili you can, learn in six
months," Prof. Marckwardt com-
mented.-
In answer to questions such as
these the conference drew some
general recommendations as to the
teaching of languages for Peace
Corps use.
One of the first conclusions
reached was that language train-
ing will have to very with each
individual program, as the re-
quirements for practically every
Preview Open
For Petitions
Petitioning has opened for seven
positions of the Michigan Preview,
predicted to be "the biggest event
ever to be held at the University
designed to arouse enthusiasm in
both students and faculty alike,"
which will be held Sept. 16, the
Saturday before classespbegin.
"We intend to surround Ferry
Field with booths from every stu-
dent organization on campus" F.
Jack Petoskey director of orien-
tation and originator of this idea,
said yesterday.
Petitions for the chairmanships
of the committees-publicity, fa-
cilities, tickets, alumni relations,
program and entertainment- and
the secretary position may be pick-
ed up outside the Interfraternity
Council office in the SAB, and
must be returned by Wednesday.
NAACP Collects
$267 n Drive
The three-day campus NAACP
fund drive ended with a total of
$267, Brereton Bissell, '61, drive
chairman, said yesterday.
About $200 will be used for
"Operation Freedom," a long range
plan to aid economically boycot-
ted families in Fayette and Hay-
wood counties, Tenn. The re-
mainder will be donated to the
National Scholarship Service and
Fund which provides funds for
Negroes entering integrated col-
leges and whites attending pre-
viously all Negro schools.

project will differ. Engineers go-
ing to Tanganyika will face many
different problems, require a dif-
ferent technical vocabulary and
possibly even speak a different
dialect than a group of elementary
teachers going to the same coun-
try.
To meet these difficulties, the
group hopes to closely coordinate
area and language training. If
this idea were put into practice,
there would be no specific train-
ing centers.
Special Attention
In instigating such a program it
is felt that special attention must
be given to the ability of a volun-
teer to learn a new language.
Therefore, part of the Peace Corps
program might well be a course
in language readiness training
which would motivate the student
for learning. The first part of the
training would be given in the
United States while formal in-
struction in the specific language
would come in the designated
country.
Also under discussion as the
teaching of English as a second
language. "Because you speak a
language does. not necessarily
mean you are a qualified teacher
of it," Prof. Marckwardt said.
' A program for teaching English
will have to be "modest in scope"
as against the number of people
free to train people for a project
is a serious factor. Prof. Marck-
wardt thinks that perhaps a pro-
gram of teacher aids can be put
into effect.
Rather than preparing English
teachers at the outset, it might be
better to think in terms of train-
ing teacher's aids. Through the
Peace Corp teacher's greater f a-
miliarity with the language,he
may be able to accomplish a great
deal while cutting down the ne-
cessity for a full-time instructor.
"All of this talk is merely about
methods of teaching. The details
and technique of just how it all
will be done is again another prob-
lem,"' Prof. Marckwardt said.
Martin Asks
For Petitions
Petitions for committee posts on
the Summer ReAding and Discus-
sion Program may be picked up
on the first floor of the Student
Activities Building, SGC Admin-
istrative Vice-President John Mar-
tin, '62, announced Wednesday.
Petitions must be returned by
Tuesday for the committee, which
is a program of summer reading
and fall discussion. Roger Season-
wein, '61, is presently chairman
of the program.

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fountain pens repaired
Gothic Film Society

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515 E. William

Shows at 1:00 - 2:55 - 4:55 - 7:00 and 9:00
Feature at 1:25 - 3:20 - 5:20 - 7:25 and 9:25

rVopo

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F-

f

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The West Quadrangle Quad-
rants tapped fourteen new mem-
bers Wednesday night.
Those chosen were Albert Fow-
erbaugh, '62, Parker Hallberg, '61,
Carl Karlsson, '62, Edwin McCon-
key, '63E, Gregory Milkins, '62,
Melvin Modderman, '63, Dennis
Moore, '63, Melvin Moss, '63, Rich-
ard Ostling, '62, Richard Pratt,
'61, Paul Rattray, '63, John
Sshreves, '62E, David Walters,
'63, and Robert Walters, '63E.
-Ol

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TR .-Y T-mes
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KRAMER COLOR
The JGGLERCOLOR

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and

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