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April 27, 1961 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-04-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, APRII. :

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, APRHI

student Picketing Marks
leaction to Cuban Invasion

(UPS)-Petitions, picketing and
rallies marked student reaction to
last week's unsuccessful invasion
of Cuba.a
A group of Swarthmore College,
students circulated a petitipn -to
about 1,000 students at 300 col-3
leges and universities protesting
United States "intervention" ina
Cuba. It also expressed a desire to1
establish "avenues of communica-
tion among students who are of?
similar persuasion to co-ordinate
activities regarding these issues."
The group said it was not neces-
sarily pro-Castro, but that it
merely advocated a policy to end
American intervention into Cuban
affairs.
Heckle Rally
Members of anti-Castro groups
heckled a rally protesting Ameri-
can action in Cuba at the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin.
The rally, sponsored by Socialist
Club, was called to present a view
which the group believes has had
little airing in the nation's press.
However, the meeting was dis-
rupted by 20 marchers who entered
the theatre where the rally was
held chanting "Cuba ail Russia
no!"
Chaos Reigns
For a half hour, the Wisconsin
Daily Cardinal reported, chaos
reigned as the anti-Castroitei
Road Projects
Top Program
Two major street projects will
top Ann Arbor's second six-year
capital improvements program,
costing $9 million, the City Plan-
ning Commission announced yes-
terday.
Planning commission officials
said that Huron Parkway must be
considered the most important
highway project entirely under-
taken by the city. It will extend
from Platt Rd. between Packard
Street and Washtenaw Avenue
through North Campus to U.S. 23
north of the city.
Engineering surveys and land
acquisition are now proceeding and
construction will get under way
in 1963. Completion of the $2.25
million project will require ap-
proval of a bond issue by the
voters.
A voted bond issue will also be
necessary for the Fuller Road pro-
ject. However, the University will
pay an undetermined share of the
total cost.
Improvements to Fuller Road
will provide an alternate access to
the Eastbelt roadway (now under
construction) and will facilitate
travel between central and north
campus.
'U' Glee Club
Elects Heads

heckled, booed and waved p-
cards. One group unfurled a ban-
ner proclaiming "Remember Hun-
gary."
A compromise was finally
reached turning the rally into a
debate between the groups pro-
and anti-United States interven-
tion.
The socialists also ciruclated two
petitions; one urging the United
States to enforce its Neutrality
Act and the other endorsing a
letter sent to President John F.
Kennedy by Norman Thomas and
Eric Fromm.
Violence Marks Rally
Heckling also marked a Fair
Play for Cuba Committee rally at
the University of Minnesota. Ac-
cording to the Minnesota Daily,
violence was sparked when John
Greenagel, a sophomore opposing
the committee, attempted to speak
at the rally.
An effigy depicting both Cuban
Premier Fidel Castro and the fair
play committee was later found
hanging in front of a university
building.

Petitions Out
For Council
Committees
Student Government Council Ad-
ministrative Vice-President John
Martin, '62, announced yesterday
that petitions for seats on five
SGC committees are now avail-
able.
Petitions, which may be picked
up on the first floor of the SAB,
are due May 8.
Positions open include a chap.-
manship and three one-year terns
on Cinema Guild Board, the group
which selects the movies to be
shown at Cinema Guild. Members
of this committee are guests of
the sponsoring organization at
any showing.
Five one-year positions are open
on the Human Relations Board, a
committee that works with dis-
crimination cases on campus and
"encourages better human ref a-
tions in the University and Ann
Arbor communities."
There are also seven one-year
openings on the Student Relations
Board, which develops activities
designed to arouse the interest
and participation of students and
alumni.
Four other one-year terms are:
chairman of the Early Registra-
tion Pass committee, which hears
requests from students desiring
"out of order" registration, Stu-
dent Book Exchange Manager,
who earns $100 each semester and
two assistant managerships which
pay $50 per semester.
Group Gives
Russian Grants
The Carnegie Corporation has
granted $10,750 to the University's
Russian department to provide
partial scholarships for 20 stu-
dents to study Russian in a 10
week course this summer.
Three University students, Anita
Lieberman, '63, Frank Wordick,
'63, and Bonnie Roeber, '64, will
participate in the program.
As part of an experiment to de-
termine how much Russian can
be learned in such a program,
undergraduates who were chosen
from colleges and universities all
over the United States will spend
six weeks in an intensive third-
year Russian course at the Uni-
versity before going to Russia fori
a month.
In order to determine the pro-
gress of the students as well as the
success of the whole projects, three
sets of tests will be given to the
participants in the program. The
first series of exams will be taken
this summer when the students
first arrive here, another after
the initial six weeks of training,
and a final testing in New York
after the month in Russia.

By FRED ULEMAN
This year over 1,500 doctors are
enrolled in University post-grad-
uate medicine courses which are
guided by the philosophy that
"education is a lifelong process and
the best medical knowledge comes
from actual practice," said direc-
tor Dr. John Sheldon.
Clinics and lectures are readily
available to any Michigan doctor,
although there have been partici-
Critic To Speak
On Artistic Puns
Katherine Kuh, art critic of the
Saturday Review, will speak at
4:15 p.m. today in the Architec-
ture Auditorium on "Visual Puns
and Abbreviations in Present-Day
Art."

CONTINUOUS EDUCATION:
Doctors Study Post-Graduate Medicine

pants from 46 of the 50 states,
Canada, Mexico, India, Australia
and Africa.
The post-graduate medicine pro-
gram offers courses for doctors in
15 rural Michigan areas as well
as refresher courses whicn last
from 1-5 days and courses for
highly specialized techniques
which may last as long as 6 years.
The program, instituted in 1927,
draws doctors of all ages. One
man came to his first conference
at the age of 68-after he had re-
tired. Another has been attending
the courses annually for 30 years.
The average doctor, however, is
middle-aged and, having been out
of school for a while, feels the
need to be brought, up to date on
the latest medical developments.
"Much of the value of the con-
ferences is in talking to the other

doctors attending," said Dr. Shel-
don.
Other values of the program are
seeing how things are differently
done in different parts of the
country, finding out how much
one doesn't know, and being in-
formed of advances in those
things which one does know.
"The post-garduate program is
many things to many people, but
is comprehensive and valuable to
any doctor," said Dr. Ralph Cox,
To Show Film
On Air Science
The air science department and
the Arnold Air Society will pre-
sent a technicolor film titled "The
Argus Experiment" at 4:10 today
in the Multipurpose Rm. of the
Undergraduate Library.

BIG-TIME WRESTLING
at Ann Arbor High
FRIDAY, APRIL 28 ... 8:00 P.M.
FEATURE BOUT:
RICKY "The Crusher" CORTEZ
vs
DICK "Mr. Michigan" GARZA
plus THREE OTHER BOUTS, including a tag team match
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
Gi e
presents
Thursday and Friday:
OF MICE AND MEN
Saturday and Sunday:
THE END OF ST. PETERSBERG

I

The Michigan Men's Glee Club
chose officers for the coming aca-
demic year Tuesday night.
Elected by the members at
large were: President, Thomas W.,
Gething, '61 and vice-president,
James W. Wilkins, '63.
An executive committee appoint-
ed Robert C. Pierce, '63E, business
manager; Keith C. Johnson, pub-
licity manager; Roger :N. Ser-
geant, '61E, alumni relations di-
rector; Robert J. Lewis, '63, tick-
et and program director; Donald
F. Cole, '64, office director; Gor-
don L. Elicker, '62, historian;
James D. Cross, '64, stage direc-
tor; Philip T. Lincoln, '64, assistant
business manager and Michael F.
Baad, '63NR, assistant publicity
manager.
Police Arrest
CORE Group
Police arrested four members of
the New Orleans Congress On
Racial Equality on April 17 for
picketing Woolworth's and Mc-
Crory's.
The pickets had previously re-
ceived assurances that they would
be unmolested by the police de-
partment as long as the number
of picketersbdidknot exceed four
per square block.
The CORE members claim they
had not in any way violated this
stipulation. CORE is asking its
branches in other cities to protest
the action.

SPRING WEEKEND
...paddle ball contest
Plane.Parade*
For 'Weekend'
Spring Weekend festivities will
begin at 3 p.m. tomorrow with
a parade from the Diag to Palmer
Field, the site of "Hour Town."
The costumed male participants
will compete for the title "Lady
of the Hour. They will be judged
on the originality of their cos-
tumes, the relationship of, the
costume to the building, parading
ability and enthusiasm.
After the caravan reaches Pal-
mer Field, the building .of the
housing units will begin. Plans
designated beforehand will go un-
der construction with "unconven-
tional" undisclisedl building- ma-
terials: Male participants must
dress in female garb and decorate
the house, while the girls, in work-
men's dress must do all the actual
construction unaided.
"Erred Era," more commonly
known as Skit Night, will begin
at 8 p.m. with Prof. Richard L.
Cutler of the psychology depart-
ment, as master of ceremonies.
Five groups will present original
skits: They are Kappa Delta and
Theta Delta Chi with "Old Noah
Jones;" Alpha Epsilon Phi and
Delta Tau Delta and "The Inter-
Historical Public Relations Cor-
poration;" Kappa Kappa Gamma
and Sigma Phi Epsilon together
on "Salem '61;" Delta Gamma and
Phi Gamma Delta and "Monkey
Shines;" Sigma Kappa and Tau
Delta Phi with "Redopus Sex."
On Saturday, the festivities will
continue with a canoe race on the
Huron River, an attempt to cap-
ture a greased pig and a corn eat-
ing contest. The grand finale for
the weekend will be a dance on
Saturday evening featuring Sarah
Vaughan.
Homecoming
Posts To Open
Petitioning for positions on the
Homecoming central committee
will begin tomorrow afternoon.
The announcement was made by
newly chosen committee co-chair-
men Barbara Condon, '62Ed, and
Neil Cohen, '62. Petitions will be
available at the student offices of
the Michigan Union.

AIre 13

DIAL
NO 2-6264

HELD
OVER

3
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F,'

FAVORS
by
BUD-MOR
1103 S. University NO 2-6362
DIAL NO 8-6416
ENDING TONIGHT
stOne of the Year's
It --N. VY Times--Herald Tribune,
Best MN. Y.Post -Saluiday Review
* STARTING FRIDAY *
"Broad Humorl--N.Y Times
"Highly Recommended ."
"MAKE MINE
MIN K"! TERRY-
THOMAS

"NO INCREASE IN PRICES-REGULAR ADMISSION PRICES PREVAIL.
THE6REATET SIARANDJ
OENI I «

" SHOWS AT 1:00
3:30 - 6:20and 9:10
FEATURES AT 1:00
3:45 -- 6:30 and 9:15.

In January 1940, about three
weeks before the first showing
of Grapes of Wrath, Lewis (All
Quiet on the Western Front)
Milestone's film version of
Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men
opened. This was the first
Steinbeck movie. Since then
several Steinbeck novels and
short stories (The Red Pony,
The Pearl, The Moon Is Down,
East of Eden) and movie-scripts
(Viva Zapata) have appeared,
been financially successful and
dramatically effective.
Most books, because their
characters and situations must
be simplified to meet the time
and esthetic demands of the
screen, simplify into nothing-
ness. This has not been true
for Steinbeck's works. In almost
all of his stories, economic
forces and social movements
have been inextricably tied to
the destinies of his characters.
I believe that it can be success-
fully argued that this vital re-
lationship between characters
and socio-economic forces e.g.,
revolution, dust-bowl migra-
tion, gives a depth and solidity
to his prose stories (characters,
plot, setting) once they have
been translated into the film
media that they would not have
had otherwise.
Milestone immediately throws
his audience into the story (giv-
ing the screen credits after the
story has begun is a convention
common in modern movies, but
it startled critics and audiences
in 1940). Escaping an armed
posse are two men - one a
huge, gangling fellow, the other
an agile and comparatively
small man. The big one is Len-
nie (Lon Chaney Jr.), a Hercu-
les with the mind and fascina-
tions (he loves to stroke soft
things) of a child. The other is
his friend George (Burgess
Meredith) who, necessarily,
must do the thinking for them
both. Employing the pattern of
confinement and release which
he uses throughout the film,
Milestone has his hunted men
clamber aboard a moving
freight car. In a few moments
we feel the sense of release as
the two move out of the con-
finement of the car into the
vast freedom of the Southern
California landscape.
When our two lonely friends
hire on as workers at a barley
ranch, they are once again in-
volved with society. Around
them are other migrant workers
equally as lonely, and a boss
whose littleness makes him hate
big men and whose bored, un-
satisfied wife (Betty Field)
makes him jealous of all men
Linked by the common denomi-
nator, overwhelming loneliness
and usually unable to express
it in anything more than two-
syllable words--"Guys like us
that work on ranches is the
loneliest guys in the world"-
they are an unusually pathetic
group. Nevertheless, these
grown men, little Hercules
capable of a good day's work
battle for dignity and try to
combat their loneliness by
dreaming; and George and Len-
nie are beautiful dreamers
They work at the dream of one
day owning their own little
farm, of a time when they can
stop running, stop moving
Even Mae, sick of her husband
and his Jealousy, can sit in the

sustained by his dreams.
But dream what they will

humanity, this film is certainly
"among the good films of aly
time . ."
* * *
Seeing a long series of Soviet
films in 1947-48 at the Museum
of Modern Art was a unique ex-
perience historically. The Cold
War was at its most frigid. To
most Americans-and my reac-
tions were like theirs - there
was at least an initial defense
in negative reactions to the se-
ries by Esenstein, Pudhovkin
Dostchenko. Were not these
films pure propaganda? What
were they trying to say, apart
from advancing the cause of
the totalitarian government
that they obviously reflected?
At that point I felt that the
brilliant series of Eisenstein
films were, in the essential
sense, propaganda. Nothing that
happened in an Eisenstein film
had anything more to say than
that "history" had caught up
with its opponents. Beautiful
though his films were, they neg-
ated the individual. I found
them monumental and often
thrilling but also calculated and
essentially cold. It took second
viewings - and a ripening in
film experience-before I saw
Eisenstein's films as one of the
great achievements in twenti-
eth century art.
' Essentially, however, my early
negative responses to Eisen-
stein were due to my simulta-
neous exposure to three films
of his great contemporary and
rival, Vsevolod Pudovkin. Here,
it seemed to me, were present
in fullest measure the qualities
that I felt lacking in Eisen-
stein: poetry, lyricism, humani-
ty. They possessed the epic
sweep no less than Eisenstein,
and an equal skill in cutting to
reach great climaxes. Pudovkin
was a great romantic artist,
Eisenstein a classic; in these
initial experiences, Pudovkn's
immediacy was directly moving.
For Eisenstein the hero of his
films was always the "masses;"
and this concept is something
that Americans, nourished on
an individualistic tradition, find
difficult to understand. The
masses, of course, are society in
the classic Marxist apotheosis;
and when I term Esenstein a
classic artist, it is in this sense
of the subordination of the in-
dividual to the social setting.
Pudhovkin's aesthetic was quite
different; he concentrated on
inner emotion, the release of
the individual through mean-
ingful thought that is even-
tually released in revolutionary
action. Eisenstein's analysis of
Pudovkin, whatever their dif-
ferences, is an illuminating
tribute: "In his films the spec-
tator's attention is not concen-
trated on the development of
sthe plot, but on the psychic
change undergone by some in-
dividual under the influence of
the social process. Pudovkin
puts real living men in the cen-
ter of his work. His works act
directly by their emotional
power"
In the past several years a
number of Esenstein's films
have been presented to the Ann
Arbor public-but not one of
Pudhovkin, although he, like
Eisenstein, is represented on
the "Twelve Best of All Time"
poll taken by the Brussels crit-
ics. The End of St. Petersberg

ha he samesbject asEisn
stein's Ten Days That Shook
the World, the triumph of the
Bolshevik Revolution, and both

I

Read
Daily
Classifieds

O-STARQING -
DAN DAJLE(- SHIRLEY JONES -LUS MAURICE CHEVALIER * BING OROSBY
MICHAEL CALLAN * BOBBY DARIN * SAMMY DAVIS Jr.* JIMMY DURANTE
ZSA ZSA GABOR * *JUDY GARLAND * GREER GARSON* ERNIE KOVACS
JANET LEIGH*JACK LEMMON *JAY"NORTH *KIM NOVAK*DONNA REED
DEBBIE REYNOLDS * EDWARD G. ROBINSON *_FRANK SINATRA
APAIQAS THEMSELVES

Um 1.

DOUBLE ACADEMY

ENDING TONIGHT

AWARD WINNER SHOW

f , BEST PICTRE)

s.G.C. Gitema quild
TONIGHT and Tomorrow at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9:00
STEINBECK'S PUDHOVKIN'S
OF MICE AND MEN The End of St. Petersberg

"THE APARTMENT
JACK LEMMON '--...."*.
SHIRLEY MacLAINE
FRED MaoMURRAY
RWn " 6WtNmf -AR 9:4
Shown at 1:00-5:20 --9:45

:.1

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