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March 11, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SA

ti

TINE MIChIGAN DAILY SA LI

iford

ds Food

CENTRAL COMMITTEE:
Sawyer Explains Rise
Of Democrats in State

Fayette
than two and a half tons
i have been collected at
rd High School in Detroit
:ro tenant farriers in Fay-
di Haywood Counties, Tenn.
ael Zweig, '64, who ar-
the drive for Voice political
ald that supplies are over-
the garage they are stored
problem," Carol Cohen, '64,
'ennessee Campaign chair-
id, "is that we have no way
sport the food to Ann Ar-
has been promised a truck
nsport the goods to Ten-
by a Teamsters local in
Detroit high school was
ed by Zweig shortly after
meeting in January. The
,hool students arranged for
drives and campaigns in
rd and other schools in the
vfiss Cohen had originally
t that a panel truck could
the food in two trips but
st night that it would be
ible.
supplies, including the food
?etroit and food and cloth-
lected in Ann Arbor, Ypsi-
3attle Creek and Ohio will
en down to the Tennessee
s during spring vacation.
donations will aid Negroes
legedly have been thrown
e land for attempting ,to
r and vote in the November
ntial' election. '
I1d Theory
1 HaircusI

,'+ --

A heavy emphasis on political
issues, wide use of "volunteer pro-
fessionals," and a preference for
word - of - mouth communication,
have marked the rise of the Michi-
gan Democratic Party during the
last decade, Prof. Robert Sawyer,
of Central Michigan University
said.
Polie Alter
With Trimes

By DAN HALES
Ann Arbor, a city of 67,000
people, has seen many changes
in its police department since the
birth of the city 110 years ago.
The department today employs
94 people of which 81 are police
officers, the rest being secretaries
and administrators.
On May 3, 1847, the town elect-
ed H. K. Stanley the first marshal
of the village. The first police
chief and his deputies received no
compensation for their services.
The deputies together with night-
watchmen employed by the. local
merchants patroled the town after,
dusk.
Establish Department
For 25 years the marshal and
his deputies kept law and order in
Ann Arbor. It wasn't until No-
vember 6, 1871 that the police de-
partment was officially establish-
ed. The new department consist-
e'd of five men headed by the
marshal. Each patrolman received
$2.00 per day,' and the marshal
was awarded $2.25 a day for his
services.
Until,1884 there was no means
of communication between the de-
partment and the town. To make
a complaint, a citizen would have
to run down to the marshal's of-
fice or to the nearest patrolman.
To make the department more ef-
ficient, the City Council approved
the installation, of a phone in the
marshal's office and in his home.
As of 1910, the only piece of
equipment owned by the depart-
ment was an unclaimed bicycle,
which eased the footwork of the
patrolmen. Previously, all major
calls were answered by running to
the nearest corner and renting a
horse and buggy.

This view is expressed in Prof.
Sawyer's new book, "The Demo-
cratic State Central Committee in'
Michigan: 1949-59; The Rise of
the New Politics and the New
Political Leadership," published by
the University's Institute of Pub-
lic Administration.
The Democrats broke the Re-
publican "near monopoly" of state
power in the 1930's, but "the two
party system remained in a pre-
carious position until the mid-
1950's," Sawyer said.
Firmly Established
"Democratic victories since 1954
indicate that the two party sys-
tem is now firmly established," he
declared.k
When new leaders assumed con-
trol of the party in 1949, they
enjoyed a large "hard core" fol-
lowing of labor, immigrant groups.
Negroes and southern born whites.
However, increased strength in
the small towns and rural areas
was essential to the Democrats
success, he added.
Consider Means
Top party leaders consider word
of mouth communication the most
successful means of reaching the
voters and party workers. This Jr
achieved by meetings and exten-
sive travels of party officers ard
staff, top government officials,
and members of ,the party's speak-
ers bureau, he noted.
A new type of worker-the vol-
unteer professional-controls the
middle and top echelons of tne
party. For this group, politics is
a way of life that is a continuous
process, not a sporatic one. The.
belief that politics is a "dirty
business" is emphatically rejected,
Sawyer stated.
This issue consciousness of the
Democrats is the result of labor
support for liberal, issue-minded
,leaders, Sawyer stated.
Work 'Started'
To Demolish
Aged Building
Demolition began this week on
the Engineering Research Services
Building which formerly 'housed
the Office, of Research Adminis-
tration.
Located at 1219 Washtenaw,
Ave.. the building was scheduled
to be torn down because it was
too obsolescent to justify recon-
ditioning, John McKevitt, assist-
ant ┬░to the vice-president for busi-
ness and finance, said.
He indicated the University has
no plans at present to' build an-
other structure on the site.
The facilities of the Office ofI
Research, Administration, which
were located in the building, are
now on the first floor of the Tem-
porary Classrooms Bldg.
George Prosser, supervisor of
the reports and reproduction of-
fice, expressed approval of the
changes noting "the quarters have
more space and bettor lighting,'
and is less jammed than old of-
fices.",

ANCHORS AWEIGH-Prof. Harry B. Benford and Prof. Louis A.
Baier prepare to launch a model in the naval tank in West En-
gineering Bldg. The facility is the largest non-government owned
tank in the country.
Naval ArChitecture Dept.
Increases in Size, Stature

Group Plans
Folk Music
Festival
By DAVID MARCUS
The Foklore Society is sponsor-
ing a folk music festival including
seminars, two concerts and folk
instrument workshops the week-
end of April 22 and 23.
Frank Hamilton, head of theI
faculty of the Old Town School of
Folk Music in Chicago, will be
featured at the Sunday afternoon
concert, Howard Abrams, '62, an-
nounced.
"We've been kicking around the
idea of a festival for a couple of
years," he said. "It crystalized this
year and if this one is a success,
we'll try to make the festival an
annual affair."
Made Records
Hamilton has made several re-
cordings, some by himself, and.
others accompanying various art-
ists. He has appeared in night
clubs and at Orchestra Hall in
Chicago playing the Schubert song
cycle for guitar and bass voice.
Besides the Sunday afternoon
concert, there will be a Saturday
night performance by Bill McAdoo,
Paul Prestipino, Marshall Brick-
man, Joe Hickerson, Ricki Sher-
over, and others.
McAdoo, a former University
student, has made several records.
Prestipino, a banjoist, is noted as
a Scruggs picker, a special style
of playing the instrument, Abrams
said.
Brickman leads a "blue-grass
style" band from the University of
Wisconsin and Hickerson and
Sherover, both graduate students
at the Unversity of Wisconsin, are
ballad singers.
Hold Seminars
Another aspect of the two-day
festival will be Saturday morning
semnars discussing the problems
of folk music.
"We intend to discuss such ques-
tions as how you can distinguish
between good and bad folk music,
and just how important are tradi-
tions in folk musc," Abrams ex-
plained.
"These are the general problems
of any art form which is not too
sure of itself."
Saturday afternoon, the group
will sponsor folk instrument work-
shops. Teachers of each instru-
ment and representatives of the
various styles of playing will at-
tend and work with participants.
BARBARA CARRUTH
AT THE PIANO
SUNDAY, MARCH 12
4:15 P.M.
Angell Hall Aud. A.
Free Admission

s. G.C.i
- -
TONIGHT and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
Hauptmann's
THE SINS ,OF ROSE BERNDT
with Maria Schell,
Raf Vallone
Short: BLACK and WHITE
in SOUTH AFRICA
ARCH ITECTURE AUDITORI UM
50 Cents
LAST: TIME TONIGHT
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Dept. of Speech
presents
OPERA DEPT.
School of Music

I . j

University psychiatrists
evealed that hair is psycho-
ly significant, and men's
ts have become progressively
r to keep up with today's
itlon.
Stanley J. Woolams and Dr.
d E. Trnuskey say that long
formerly a universal sym-
strength and virility is now
ular because "civilzation re-
a subduing of the purely
al for the more spiritual
.ts?
psychiatrists also considered
l's hair styles: not until
were accorded political and
freedom along with men did
urn to shorter hair-do's. The
resses represented the wom-
assive role in society.

By FRED RUSSELL KRAMER
The University's naval archi-
tecture and marine engineering
department has almost doubled in
size since 1956.
During the same period of time
the number of graduate students
enrolled in the department has in-
creased ten-fold. This year's soph-
omore class is twice as large as
last year's, Prof. Harry Benford
of the naval architecture depart-
ment said yesterday.
Being the world's largest naval
architecture, department has not
created problems of becoming too
big as the department has only 120
students.
Size Is Unique
Prof. Benford believes that the
-small size of the group combined.
with the large resources of the
University make the department
unique. The friendly atmosphere
within the department permits a
close relationship between students
and faculty members, Prof. Ben-
ford said.
The curriculum has been kept
up to date with the addition of
courses in nuclear engineering and
advanced mathematics. The stu-
dent is taught the fundamentals
of such varied disciplines as hy-
drodynamics, electronics, and ad-
vanced engineering mechanics.
Work-Study Plan
ftudents in the department can
avail themselves of a number of
highly remunerative scholarship
programs. Among these is a work-

study plan in conjunction with the
New York and Boston naval ship-
yards.'
Under this program, 25 students
in the department receive full tui-
tion and expenses during' their
first and last years in school. Dur-
ing the other years, the students
receive salary for working alter-
nate semesters and summers in
one of the two shipyards. Eligibil-
ity for the scholarship is based on
a competitive examination.
Schilling Set's
Religion Talk
Prof. Harold K. Schilling, dean
of the Pennsylvania State Uni-
versity graduate school, will dis-
cuss "The Permanent and the
Transient in'Scientific and Reli-
gious Thought" at 1:30 p.m. to-
day in Aud. A.
Prof. Schilling will be the prin-,
cipal speakerat the Religion and
Natural Sciences workshop spon-
sored by the Office of Religious
Affairs. He will speak again at
4 p.m. in room 3R of the Michi-
gan Union on "Creed, Faith and
Revelation in Science and Reli-
gion" and at 8 p.m. In room 3R
of the Union on "The Contem-
porary West's Two Myths and
Faiths."
Seminars chaired by faculty
members are also scheduled for
the woi'kshop.

jn
Debussy's romantic opera,
PELLEAS

&

4

aI

e doctors noted that English
wigs have psychological sig-
nee as they represent the
m and dignity of the bench.
:haelangelo, they added, de-
I God as the all-powerful
or utilizing long hair and a
ig beard..
:en they scalped enemies,:
i American Indians were -only
ring the symbol of life and.
gth, added the psychiratrists.
ere are limits to the theory,
ver. Men consider the shorter
uts desirable, but baldness
provokes their consideration
)uees and hairpieces, they.

4 Buys Car
But in order to keep up with the
times',' the department saved
enough money to buy a second
,hand automobile in 1913.
With the invention of the auto-
mobile came traffic problems
which still cause many headaches
to the men of the department.
Six traffic lights were purchased
in 1922 to cope with the rising
number of horseless carriages.
Prior to 1927, the men of the
force worked 12 to 13 hours a.
day, with no days off during the
week. However, as the department
grew, it was found necessary to
install the platoon system where-
by three shifts a day were initiat-
ed. Today, no man works over
eight hours a day, and be has
several days off each month.

l

MELISAN DE
8:00 P.M. Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box office open 10 A.M. to 8:0 P.M.
$2.00, $l.50

Latecomers will not be seated
during Act One.

the first annual
development council
concert features

El I

Continuous
today
from 1 o'clock

i; l o

DIAL
NO 8-6416

________________________ fl. S... .

11DAILY OFFICIAL 31

rhe Daily Official Bulletin is an
ficial publication of The Uifver-
y of Michigan for which The
ichigan Daily assumes no editorial
sponsibility. Notices should be
at in TYPEWRITTEN form to
mom 3519 Administration Building,
fore 2 p.m. two days preceding
blication.
SATURDAY, MARCH 11
eneral Notices
lysical Education -- Women Stu-
s: All women students who were
ically excused from physical edu-
on for the first season of the
nd semester, but who will be albe
Organizatio
Notices
xagr. Disc. E & R Student Guild,
J. E. Edwards, "Biblical Thought,".
a.m.; Evening Guild, 7 p.m.;' Mar.:
524 Thompson.
Aklore Soc., Guitar & Banjo In-
ction Workshops, Mar. 11, 2-4 p.m.,
,3rd Fl.
Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, Mar.
-5 p.m., 3050 FB.
esley Fdn., Prof. W. Willcox, "Prot-
at-Catholic Tensions," 10:15 a.m.
3 Rm.; Fellowship Supper, 5:30 p.m.,
E. Edwards, "Salvation," 7 p.m.,
ley Lounge; Mar. 12.

to resume activity for the second sea-
son, should fill in registration forms in
Office 15, Barbour Gym immediately.
Placement
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Merrill-Palmer Institute, Detroit -
Summer Workshops offering college
credit-undergrad. & grad.-to students
& professional people: 1) "Human Dev.
& Human Rels.", 2) "Counseling with
Students in Family Living Courses,"
3) "Role of Professional Person in Ra-
cially Changing Neighborhoods," 4)
Inter-Institutional Seminar in Child
Dev." Some scholarships available. File
application by May 15.
City of New York-Civil Service open-
ings: Asst. Hospital Administrator -
MA Hosp. Admin. & 4 yrs. exper. Lab.
Aide-BS. Jr. Engnrs.-BSME & BSChE.
Electrical Engrg. Draftsman-BSEE. Sr.
Accountant-BBA & 4 yrs. acctg. ex-
per. Also, Licensed Supervisor of Radio
Operations-degree not essential but 5
yrs. radio operationsexper. req.
Cleary College, Ypsilanti, Mich. -
Adv. law student with BA who can
teach Econ. & Pol. Sci. Start: March
28.
U.S. Civil Service-VII Region-Ex-
perienced Traffic Management Special-
ist & Traffic Manager. BA in appro-
priate field with courses in transpor-
tation, traffic mgmt., econ., bus. ad.,
acctg., finance, statistics, etc.

Mathematica Co., Susidiary of Mtk.
Res. Corp. of Amer., Princeton, N.J.-
PhD's in Math for res. on mgmt. probs.
of industry & govt..
Please contact Bureau of Appts., 4p21
Admin., Ext. 3371 for further informa-
tion'.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTER-
VIEWS-128H West Engrg. Bldg., Ext.
2182. For seniors & grzd. students.
MARCH 14--
City of Detroit, Depts. of City Gov't.
-MS: Munic. & Sanitary. BS: ChE,
CE, EE, E. Math, EM, E. Physics, ME,
Met. & Science. Des.
Ex-Cello-O Corp., Entire Ex-Cello-O
Corp.-BS-MS: AE, EE, EM, IE, ME.
BS: E. Physics & Science. MS: Instru.
& Nuclear & Applied Mech. U.S. citi-
zenship required except England, Ger-
many, India, Canada. Des., Res. &
Dev., Sales, Prod., Mgmt. Trng. Prog.
General Motors Corp., Cadillac Motor
Car Div., Detroit-BS-MS: IE & ME.
Prod., Cost Estimating.
Inland Steel Co., Indiana Harbor
Works, E. Chicago, Ill.-BS-MS: IE &
Met. BS: ChE. Qual. Control & Indust.
Engrg.
Litton Systems, Inc., Beverly Hills,
Woodland Hills, & Canoga Park, Calif.
--All Degrees: EE. BS: E. Math & E.
Physics. Des, R. & D., Inertial Guid-
ance Sys., Digital Computers, Sys. Test,
(Continued on Page 4)

The ribald, impudent, but always moving account
of the encounter between a girl-of-the-streets
in a Grecian seaport town and the American
who wants to rescue her from her
desperate (or is it?) situation.
heE pNAPWSTREETWAKER OP PIRAEUS
BETCT ESS"AADEMYWRDM
"BEST ACTRESS" ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE

RAY

c

f-
'HARLES-',
April 12th,
Hill Auditorium
Tickets: 2.00, 1.75, 150
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL SCHOLARSHIPS
Mail orders for tickets can be sent to:
RAY CHARLES CONCERT
STUDENT OFFICES
MICHIGAN UNION
Make all checks payable to the
University Development-Council.

ALL PROCEEDS GO TO THE NEW
Don't forget your date
when 'ordering
your block tickets.

DIAL'
NO 2-6264

Now

PRESENTED BY THE STUDENT RELATIONS BOARD AND THE MICHIGAN UNION

V , 1
NOW J
A- riotous, happy tme
when four U.S. sailors take
||| over a geisha housel

DIAL
NO 5-6290

Only the motion pictures can pre-
sent entertainment so spectacular!
Winner of a grand total of eleven
Academy Awards including Best
Film of The Yearl

A 140

I

p.- P U
RELEASED

COLUMN APIGIU RES V,
A WILLIAM GOETZ,
PRODUCTIONt

plopwAlawmWailli

I

If

I

Ii

I

11

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