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March 03, 1961 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-03

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. THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Committee Papyrus Doeu
a National Polity Sets Outline Much About
For~rveyBy DAVID MARCUS
F'or S rvey' Papryology, the study of an-
cient papyrus manuscripts, has
The Michigan Union's commit- revealed much about the works
tee studying the use of its facili- of Euripides, Prof. Eric G. Turner,
ties is finishing an outline for its head of the Institute of Classical
survey, Union executive vice-presi- Studies of London University, said
dent and committee member John here yesterday.
Ross II, '61, said yesterday. Speaking on "Euripides the
u Dramatist: New Papyri, Old Prob-
' non-academic University person- lems"Prof. Turner cited frag-
nel will comprise the sample. The nts of lost plays and cmmen-
size of the sample from each group ments of lost lasnd cnmen-
' ha notbee defnitey dtermn- taries on them found in excava-
has not been definitely determi- tions at Oxyrhynchus, Egypt.
ed, but it will be in accord with "Although the climate of Egypt
present methods for obtaining the ."g
most scientific results, Ross said. is dry," Prof. Turner said, "we
Students will undertake the still run into the problem of worms
project with "perhaps" some in- and torn manuscripts."
f formal advice on technical details "We can't know how the drama-
s < from the University's Survey Re- tist wove these little scraps into
search Center. Although the cost a whole dramatic context."
Daily-Henry Yee of the project was not disclosed, Prof. Turner cited fragments of
MICS iVERSUS POLITICS-Prof. Roy Pierce of the Ross added that enough money "Chesphontes," an early work of
has been budgeted to make a com- the dramatist. An unusual fea-
science department and Pritamol Singh, Grad., discuss prehensive study. ture of this play is that in one
cur other panelists the problems of political ideology and The polling will start about mid- scene. contrary to Greek stage
wt on the economics of Russia, the United States and March and end about May 15 when conventions, violence is shown on
ig nations., the committee reports its find- the stage," he said.
ings to the board of directors. He noted one ancient commen-
%te sectors of the econo- Aron Kandie of Kenya said that tator who wrote that during this
advance, but the. public a general statement cannot be scene contrary to Greek stage
st be in the hands of the made for the different states of cited that they stood up.
insure the equality of Africa but that the trends of o ea Another find at this site was
ingh said. states such as Ghana indicates "" a synopsis of many Greek plays.
se we love democracy that socialism will be chosen over T0 Participate This revealed, among other things,
no reason to reject the capitalism as the inequalities that Euripides had written two
s of Soviet economics,'' created by illiteracy,'disease and In A pC T plays about the same subject on
d. tribalism do not permit successful I raseveral occasions, approaching the
enneth Boulding of the capitalism., subject matter from a different
s department found the Crisis of Success Professors Donald Stokes of the point of view each time.
irement for economic de- The Soviet Union economy was political science department, Sam- Another fragment found and al-
litical stability about a generation behind the uel Hayes of the economics de-
ced in the government- United State's and would catch up partment and Robert Crane of the
evelohment inmndia by 1980 when it would possibly history department will partici- nU'Debate Group
a democracy."face a "crisis of success." The pate in an "International Semi-
people would then ask for the nar" sponsored by the American TO EnterContest
paring Russia and the consumer goods and rights denied Friends Service Committee on the
ates, Prof. Boulding said them for the sake of progress, weekend of March 17 to 19. Four University debaters left
h were non-European Prof. Boulding said. Fifteen foreign and American Ann Arbor yesterday to participate
countriesbon to tra- , A major difference lies in the students (graduate and under- in a debate tournament at Ohio
om civilization to past- United State's "spectacular suc- graduate) will take part in the State University.
n and both Chad a .suc- cess in agriculture" opposed to informal discussions centering on The question of the ideal Unit-
istory,' the United States Russia's "spectacular failure" in the topic "Roads to Change in ed States policy toward Africa will
lion and the Soviet Union this field. This failure will slow Newly Developing Countries." be the topic under consideration
'e,_ _ _ up economic advance. The group will meet at a home at the annual Intercollegiate Dis-
Agricultural advance is the pri- in the country near Farmington. cussion Conference over the week-
0 Imary necessity of emerging na- The total cost for the weekend end.
Jive Ta C tions, especially with the immedi- will be six dollars. Those journeying to Columbus
ate higher living standards ex- Interested students should con- are Arthur Plaxton, '61, David
hristianG ty pected by their populations, -Prof. tact Margaret Blood NO 3-4555 or Karns, '61, Maurice, '64 and Albert
Boulding said. Hurford Crossman NO 3-3943. Fowerbaugh, '62.
Weekly meeting tonight in
1.the Michian fChristian CLOUD Tf PHYSICS

inents Reveal
Greek Author
ERIC G. TURNER
..problems of worms
so noted in the synopsis was a
play, "Aeolus," concerning the
marriage of brothers and sisters. F
Prof. Turner said the ancient
playgoers were very shocked by'
this.
Still another find was that
Euripides had written a play on
the Oedipus legend. Althoughonly
a few lines are known, it seemsI
that Euripides presented Oedipus
as being blinded accidentally be
fore the action of the play. Other
lines found from the play indicate
a description of the sphinx which
harassed Thebes.
Prof. Turner also noted that
Euripides wrote two plays, now
lost, concerning the. legend of the
golden fleece.
Cites ImpaCt
Of Colera
By LINDA REISTMAN
"Russia's great cholera epidem-
ic of the 19th century was more
than just a 'magnificent belly-
ache'," Prof. Roderick McGrew
said in his lecture yesterday.
"Historians are discovering that
much of the cultural development
of the country and the evolution
of political and medical institu-
tions are entangled in the effects
Prof. McGrew is a member of
the faculty of the University of
Missouri,
Because the epidemic flourished
in Ru'ssia from 1823 until 1926,
the country was never really free
of this influence during this cru-
cial period of -its development,
Prof. McGrew said.I
"Three areas of Russian culture
were affected by the cholera epi-
demic: the medical developments
of the time, administrative his-
tory and the operation of a cen-
tralized autocratic system, and
the development of the society at
that time.
"The disease made its first ap-
pearance in 1817 in British India,
and by 1825 it had infected all of
Asia," McGrew explained. "It
reached England and France in
1833 and had a great influence in
bringing about' English reform
laws df that period. It also ag-
gravated post-revolutionary prob-
lems in France.
8-6416

SLEPT HERE!
te of the ancient city of
trod-happy, good-hearted
is as old as the poet itself.
American innocent abroad
Id screen adventure-which
have loved.
E APWSTREEII
WALKER OF PIRAUS..-
NAMERCOUff
A bubbling champagne
Cinema Cocktail!"
-Zunser, Cue

................_..__ .
..... .

BOWLING
ot
ANN ARBOR RECREATION
STUDENT RATES
MODERN --AUTOMATIC
E. Huron NO 2-01 03-

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DIAL No'w!
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CtAR MARILYN
ibleMonroe lflff
in theJohn, Huston p roduction
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Construction Starts on Rooftop Lab

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DISC SHOP 1V CENTER
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-Daily-Henry Iee
NEW LABORATORIES-On top of the East Engineering build-
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"AT BOT H STOR ES"
ALL
CAPITOL
ALL
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STEREO & H I Fl

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NOW
t7 and 9 P.M.
ARISTOTLE5
Amid the hustle and bus
Piraeus-where Aristotlei
Illia plies the trade whichi
Her encounter with the
becomes a joyous and ribal
we suspect Aristotle would
*154
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tisy $

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when you buy a second Cap./Ang. LP
at the same list price.
Includes complete catalogue.
DISC SHOP I'' CENTER
1210 S. University 304 S. Thayer
NO 3-6922 NO 5-4855

!'

S.G.C. Cihtna qul
TONIGHT at 7 and 9 SATURDAY and SUNDAY at 7 and 9
Rene Clair's THE BULLFIGHTER
A NOUS LA LIBERTE AND THE LADY
with Ravmond Cordv. Henry Marchand

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