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March 03, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-03-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

JN

Reports

By

Congo

Meriwether
A ontme
Pbasses, Vote
WASHINGTON (A)-By a single
vote, a Senate committee approv.-
ed Charles M. Meriwether yester-,
day to be a director of the Export-
Import Bank. Approval came after
Meriwether, a segregationist, de-
nied membership in the Ku Klux
Klan.
It was the closest any nominee
of President John F. Kennedy has
come to committee rejection, and
it could foreshadow trouble in the
Full Senate. Chairman A. Willis
Robertson (D-Va) said the nomi-
nation would not reach the floor
before Monday.
With six senators not voting, the
banking committee approved Mer-
twether by a 5-4 vote.t
For 2x/2 hours, the Alabaman
was questioned closely about his
views on segregation, the Klan,
anti-Semitism, and politics.
Meriwether, state finance di-
rector, is a former campaign man-
agter of Gov, John Patterson of
Alabama. Patterson was one of
the first Democratic governors to
support Kennedy for: the Demo-
'cratic presidential nomination.
Most, of the controversy over
Meriwether has been stirred by
his past association with retired
Adm. John G. Crommelin.
In recent years, Crommelin has
run for a variety of offices in Ala-
bama. Meriwether was Crommel-
in's campaign manager when he
ran for the Senate in 1950. But
Meriwether testified he severed
ties with Cronmelin later.
A hint that Meriwether's nomi-
nation was headed for trouble
emerged Wednesday at Kennedy's
news conference.
Twice, the President was asked
about Meriwether. In terse replies,
the President supported the nomi-
nation but did not elaborate.

r

10UR0
Rioting
Soldiers
9Forty Killed
In Massacre
Of Civiians
{ £ UN, Congo Troops
Patrol Luluabourg
LEOPOLDVILLE (R) -Congo-
lese troops slaughter 44 civilians
.: . at Luluabourg in the bloodiest or-
;gy since the tribal massacres in
the Congo's early days of inde-
pendence, the United Nations said
yesterday.
Amout 1,000 civilians fled in ter-
ror to UN headquarters in that
capital of Kasai province and
were given sanctuary.,
The Congolese troops, owing al-
legiance to the central govern-
ment of President Joseph Kasa-
vubu, went berserk after three of
their comrades were killed and
.three wounded by a Lumumbist
iler, member of a mob. Shooting began Tuesday
gside mooring buoy night and went- on mostof Wed-
protests the arrival nesday.
abso ri UN Reports Riots
b asDetails of the bitter fighting
that raged through the streets of
Luluabourg were given by a grim-
faced UN spokesman at a news
vow , conference.
Luluabourg, about 400 miles east
n of here, exploded into violence
u, in the wake of the city's sudden
takeover last week by Lumumbist
troops from the leftist rebel cap-
attempt to ram the ital of Stanleyville.
rry Chandled, one of The rebel soldiers later with-
explained. "But we drew, leaving Luluabourg in a fer-
the ment of confusion and divided y-
to ram us.a i alties. Most of the populace still
t a uis loyal to the memory of the late
Went, meanwhile, the Patrice Lumumba.

PROTEST POLARIS BASE -- Terry Chan
British nuclear-disarmament group, sits along
in Scotlaand's Holy Loch. Chandler's group p
of the U.S. Navy tender Proetus to set up;
carrying submarines.
British Pacifists
ToI-lockade U.S

Court Asks
Accelerated
Integration
ST. LOUIS (P) - The eighth
United States Circuit Court of
Appeals ruled yesterday the Little
Rock, Ark., school board must
speed up desegregation of the
city's schools.
The court held that constitu-
tional rights of Negro pupils had
been violated by procedures used
in making assignments to various
schools under the Arkansas pupil
placement act.
The appeals court thus upheld
arguments by attorney for 14 Ne-
gro pupils who had contended that
the board had established "a gov-
ernmental framework to prevent
desegregation."
.The appellate court reversed a
Sept. 2 ruling by Federal Judge
John E. Miller of Little Rock, who
had ruled that the board was in
compliance with the law.
The high court directed Judge
Miller to retain jurisdiction, which
Miller rejected in his September
decision.
The appeals court said the pre-
vious failure of the Little Rock
school board to make progress to-
ward desegregation might be jus-
tified. It cited the 1957-58 school
year when Central High at Little
Rock operated under supervision
of federal troops and the fact the
schools were completely closed
during 1958-59.
"However," the court said, "as
we aproach the 1961-62 school
year, sufficient time has elapsed
to compel affirmative action in
this regard to the end that there
may be integration in more than
a token fashion."
Predict Quick
Development
Of Nike-Zeus
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. WP) - The
Nike-Zeus anti-missile missile
could be in operation in less than
two years after production is or-
dered. an Army spokesman said
yesterday.
The Zeus would be this nation's
major response in the event of
any missile aggression. No money
has been appropriated for its pro-
duction.
"We are anticipating the Presi-
dent's approval of the Zeus," the
spokesman said, "and we have
people standing by to proceed
with production tests androther
functions."
The Zeus would be capable of
carrying a nuclear warhead, and
would be a major defense against
an attack by intercontinental bal-
listic missiles.
The Army is establishing facili-
ties at Kwajalein atoll in the Mar-
shall Islands for a Zeus test
against an Atlas ICBM later this
year.
Catholics Hit
School Aid Bill
WASHINGTON P) - Leading
Roman Catholic prelates yester-
day opposed President John F.
Kennedy's school aideprogram un-
less it is widened to include loans
for parochial schools.
Differing with Kennedy, they
said such aid would be constitu-
tional.
The stand was announced by
the administrative board of the
National Catholic Welfare Confer-

ence, which includes the five Unit-
ed States cardinals and ten arch-
bishops and bishops who head
conference departments. The board
met here yesterday at a time
when Kennedy was. repeating his
previously stated position that the
Constitution bars aid to parochial
schools.

HOLY LOCH, Scotland (P) - A
little group of British pacifists
threatened yesterday to throw up
a sea blockade of two dinghies
and five canoes against the Unit-
ed States Navy tender Proteus, due"
today to set up a floating base for
Polaris-carrying submarines.
At sunset the British frigate Ex-
mouth steamed unexpectedly into
the Loch and moored at the buoys
where the Proteus will. anchor.
Warship or no warship, the pa-
cifists said they intend to sail into
the path of the 18,000-ton tender
in their fleet of seven small boats.

"We won't
Proteus," Ter
the group,+
won't get ou
Proteus tries
In Parliam

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opposition, LAaor party made a
last ditch attempt to get the base
scrapped. Mrs. Barbara Castle,.
fiery former chairman of the par-
ty, accused Prime Minister Har-
old Macmillan of pressing on with
the project despite any notable
eagerness for it by the United
States administration.
"Is it not true that the Presi-
dent is perfectly willing to can-
cel this base which is merely a
matter of convenience and not of
necessity to the United States?"
she asked, "but you won't let him
cancel it because you . .. are afraid
that withdrawal would be a blow
to your prestige?"
Germans List
Foreign Aid
BONN (P) - West Germany's
foreign aid in 1961 will total 4.14
billion marks ($986.27 million),
more than five times last year's
outlay, the finance ministry said
yesterday.
Finance Minister Franz Etzel
said the total is compatible with
the needs for this year, but gave
no hint how much West Germany
will contribute in the future.
World New
By The Associated Press
MONFALCONE, Italy - Police
used clubs, tear gas and fired their
carbines into the air yesterday
during a five-hour battle with 3,-
000 stone-throwing shipyard strik-
ers. It was the worst of several
riots since the workers struck a
week ago demanding an improved
contract.
Police stood by until the strikers
overturned a truck to block traffic,
then charged the crowd and took
several strike leaders into custody.
Demonstrators then marched on
the municipal building to seek re-
lease of their leaders.
'' ' " * * . *
MOSCOW-The Soviet Union
said yesterday it has lost radio
contact with its Venus rocket.
Tass news agency reported So-
viet scientists were unable to es-
tablish radio contacts with the
automatic interplanetary station
last Monday-15 days after the
rocket was launched from an or-
biting space vehicle.

Demanded Release
The UN spokesman said the
reign of terror began Tuesday
night when about 2,000 pro-Lum-
umba demonstrators marched on
local government headquarters de-
manding the release of a police
colonel named Hulumba.
The officer had been arrested
by his own police.for showing pro-
Lumumba sympathies while rebel
troops held the city.,
Suddenly the yelling mob turn-
ed savage. Three Congo soldiers
were killed. News of the killings
reached troops in the local army
camp. Orders from their officers
were ignored and they stormed
out to collect the bodies of their
comrades and seek revenge. The
rioting 'continued for 24 hours.
UN Patrolling
Ghanaian troops of the 1,000-
man UN contingent in the capi-
tal are manning road blocks and
patrolling the streets.
The spokesman emphasized that
UN troops took no part in the
fighting.
After a battle a conference was
held between Congolese and UN
officers to prevent any further
outbreak. As a result Congolese
troops now are helping the Ghan-
alans to keep order.
s Roundup
LONDON-C. I. Orr-Ewing, civ-
it lord of the British Admiralty,
said yesterday the Soviet Union's
submarine fleet is now believed
to number about 430.
He told the House of Commons
he had not reason to doubt Pre-
mier Khrushchev's recent state-
ment that his fleet includes nu-
clear-powered subs.
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II

OPENING TONIGHT
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Dept. of Speech
presents
OPERA WORKSHOP
School of Music
in
Debussy's romantic opera,
PELLEAS

3

&

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
presents
A OC rfDEsvie

&AII'ZAkIF

..:::: : r: :.

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