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February 12, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDA

Y. E'EBRI:

Brown Describes FBI Work

Graduate Tells Purchase
Of Lost Hall Directory

ISR Studies Student Motivation Fac

_r

" 1

" -- - - - - - - - - - - - - -B row n explained that the agent
Enherently, they have to like is called upon to deal with people
ple." of all levels. "His first interview
'hat is the way the Federal might be with a cab driver who
-eau of Investigation's special has been eight years in the pen.
nt in charge of the Detroit And his second interview might
ce, Bernard C. Brown, describ- be with the President of a bank
the basic quality that FBI next door," he said.
nts must possess. He described the basic func-
.ddressing a group of law stu- tions of an agent-besides appre-
ts here recently on the .pos- hending criminals-as getting to
lities for employment in the the bottom, of a case quickly, writ-
[I he said, "We don't want ing a succinct report on the find-
t a solid 'A' student. What we're ings and making the report avail-
Ding for is someone who has able to the local legal representa-
I close relations with people tive of the attorney-general.
1 understands dealing with "It is not our job to decide
tn."' whether the attorney has a good
-ravel Board AnnoUnces
o -ost USNSA WC Tour's

Europe and Poland to Northern
Europe and the Near East. There
are "hobo" and "whirlwind" tours
for students with small budgets.
For those interested in the arts,
there are "Festival" tours cover-
ing the summer music and art fes-
tivals throughout Europe. An Ital-
ian art study tour given in coop-
eration with Bucknell University
will offer six weeks in a Florentine
villa and studies of art master-
piecgs of the Renaissance.
A study-travel tour of France is
offered, combining travel with
morning classes at the Maison des
Jeunes. in Rouen and the Sorbonne
in Paris.
For students who want first-
hand knowledge of the political,
social, and economic problems of
Latin America, a travel-seminar
tour through the area is available.
ETI also provides information
for students who wish to travel in
Europe without a specific tour,
and information concerning work
or study abroad. A USNSA stu-
dent identification card entitles
the holder to student rates in
museums, churches, and other
1 sights, she indicated.
All tours are operated in coop-
Feration with the European student
unions, which provide student
guides.
"From my point of view, the
travel service is one of the main
accomplishments of USNSA be-
cause it is something which can
benefit all students," Miss Boy-
koff added.

case; it is only our responsibility
to find out the facts about it,"
he said.
Sea of Faces
For the agent, finding the facts
requires "matching his wits against
the sea of faces which might
today be details and tomorrow be
prospective witnesses in court,"
Brown said.
Above all, the agent is "con-
tinually digging for an answer
and searching for the truth," he
said. This thoroughness is reflect-
ed by the fact that agents are
often offered jobs by the various
institutions-from corporations to
banks-after they have completed
their investigations.
"For in many cases our agent
will know more about the over-all
operation of a bank th~an its
President." He noted that despite
these offers, the FBI "has the
lowest personnel turnover of any
federal agency."
160 Laws
Brown noted that FBI agents
are charged with investigating
violations of 160 federal laws,
mostly of an inter-state nature.
The most frequent violations in-
clude interstate transportation of
stolen vehicles, interstate trans-
portation of stolen property (which
includes bank robbery and passing
forged checks), and kidnapping. ,
The FBI, as coordinator of all
Internal intelligence activity, in-
Vestigates possible espionage, sab-
otage and subversive activity. The
agency also handles special duties,
such as the investigation of rack-
eteering, as prescribed by congres-
sional legislation.
Da Costa To Talk
On Indian Plans
Eric P. W. da Costa, managing
director of the Indian Institute of
Public Opinion and editor of the
Eastern Economist, will talk on
"Problems of Indian War Plan-
ning" at 8 p.m. tonight in the
Rackham Ballroom.

By RICHARD MERCER j
On June 6, 1950, the original
Haven Hall was burned to the
ground after four futile hours of,
attempts to save the building.
The existence of the only sur-
viving remnant of the old Haven
Hall, its wooden building direc-

OLD DIRECTORY
. comes home

tory, was recently uncovered and
was given to the University,
William Mayo, Grad, was at
that time a freshman at the Uni-
versity. As the smoke was clear-
ing on the day after the fire he
bought the old directory from the
demolition contractors, and in do-
ing so preserved all that was left
of the historic structure.
The old directory has now been
given a place of honor near the
entrance to the new Haven Hall.
Built in 1863, the original Haven
Hall served varied purposes for
the growing University.
The University Library was
housed in Haven Hall until 1883.
It provided lecture hall and class-
rooms for the Law School until
1923., The first Haven Hall con-

tained the University Chapel until
1873.
Besides containing lecture and
class rooms, the former Haven
Hall housed many faculty and
administrative offices. For 35
years the Regents held their meet-
ings in the former building.
The 1950 fire not only destroyed
the old Haven Hall, but indirectly
caused the demolition of the old
University Hall, located behind
Angell Hall. Both it and old Haven
Hall had been designated as fire-
traps, and their usefulness had
been steadily decreasing as the
new Administration Bldg., Hill
Aud., and other more modern
buildings took over the functions
of these original University struc-
tures.
Peyton Views
Use of Plastics
In Dentistry
Prof. Floyd A. Peyton, head of
the materials testing laboratory
at the dental school, says den-
tists should "make conservative
application of plastics for crown
and bridge work" until superior
materials become available.
Prof. Peyton and Prof. Robert
G. Craig of the dental school pre-
sented an evaluation of plastics
in a report to the Academy for
Crown and Bridge Prosthodontists.
They described such factors as
strength, water absorption, color
stability, scratch resistance, and
hardness of both vinyl-acrylic and
epoxy plastics.
"All plastics are relatively soft
in comparison to gold alloys, fus-
ed porcelain or human tooth
enamel," they said. "The color
stability was most favorable in
the acrylic material and least de-
sirable in the -epoxy type."
Peyton said that epoxies offer
"considerable potential for future
development" but that they are
not now ideal for repair and re-
placement of human teeth.
WRITE FOR
BEST SEATS
Exciting Grand Opening
WNED., FEB 20,
thru 23-8:00 p.m.
THE
THREEPENNY
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN TH.
Wed., Thrus. $1.75-Fri., Sat. $2
A.A. Civic Theatre, P. O. Box 87
Please enclose self-addressed
stamped envelope

By THOMAS DRAPER
The elementary and junior high
school classroom is being studied
by the Institute for Social Re-
search as a social system where
teaching techniques can improve
the student's motivation to learn
and his self-esteem, Richard
Schmuck of the ISR said recently.
Schmuck said that non-aca-
demic aspects of the classroom
which affect a student's level of
achievement were the degree to
which he was accepted among his
classmates and the norms or
standards of his classmates.
The classroom study includes
three phases, Schmuck said. The
first phase, now completed, stud-
ied the individual student's rela-
tionship with the teacher and the
other members of the class.
Second Phase
In the second phase, teachers of
the classrooms studies participated
in a summer workshop to examine
the data from the research and
devise new teaching techniques in
light of the data.
"Follow up studies were con-
ducted to test how teachers' skills
were affected after they knew the
effects of certain procedures,"
Schmuck said.
Voice 'To Present
Arms Discussion
Prof. Harold Jacobson of the
political science department and
Richard Flacks, Grad, will discuss
"Foreign Policy and the Arms
Race" at Voice Political Party's
second Forum on American So-
ciety. Flacks is a research associ-
ate at the Center for Conflict
Resolution and peace projects di-
rector for Students for a Demo-
cratic Society.

"Teachers did varying amounts find techniques which individual
of work with the data, but the teachers are using, but which are
classroom environment was gen- not generally known," he corm-
erally improved as a result of the mented.
study. He added that the project works
Seek Sponsor on the assumption that there is
"The third phase of the class- not enough scientific thinking
about the social psychology of the
room project is now looking for a asoom. "Tachng olve
classroom. "Teaching involves
sponsor. Instead of deducing tech- creativity, but it requires a ra-
niques from theory, we want to tional approach."
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING NEW
IN FRATERNITY LIVING?
PHI KAPPA TAU OFFERS
YOU THE CHALLENGE OF
I CADEMIC ACTIV7ITY

allan sherman!
IN PERSON
With Orchestra, Chorus, and
Surprise Guests???
Saturday, Feb. 16-8:15 P.M.
FORD AUDITORIUM
Music World, 5017 Woodward, $2.50, $3.50, $4.50
Tickets at Grinnell's (Downtown), Marwill's Northland,
IN ANN ARBOR: Sound Center, 309 S. State St.

VISIT US DURING OPEN RUSH, 3RD
OF THE MICHIGAN UNION

MOTHER SHERMAN PRESENTS
77t4~0t 7

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Coming:
A NIGHT
ON THE
WORLD

11=

-to SjO

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be +
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12
DayC Caendar
4:00 p.m.-Dept. of Aeronautical and'
Astronauctical Eng. Seminar-Dr. A. M.]
Kuethe, Prof. of Aeronautical Eng.,
"Boundary Layer Transition on a Blunt
Body in Hypersonic Flow-Analysis of
Experiments on Combined Effects of
Cooling and Surface Roughness"; Rm.
1504, E. Eng. Bldg.
4:15 p.m.-The William W. Cook Lec-
tures on American Institutions-Adolf
A. Berle, Prof. of Law, Columbia Univ.,
"The American Economic 'Republic":
Rackham Amphitheater.
8:00 p.m.-Center for Southern Asianj
Studies and Center for Research on
Economic Development Colloquim -
Eric P.W. da Costa, Managing Director
of the Indian Institute of Public Opin-
ion and Editor of the Eastern Econo-
mist, "Problems of Indian War Plan-
ning" :Rackham Lecture Hall.
APPLIED MATHEMATICS SEMINAR:
Prof. Bernard Friedman, Research Prof.
at the Univ. of California-Berkeley,
will speak on "Some Matrices Related
to the Ising Problem" today at 4:00
p.m. in Rm. 311 W. Eng. Refreshments
will be in Rm. 350 W. Eng. at 3:30 p.m.
General Notices
History Make-up Examinations will
be held Sat., Feb. 23, 9-12 in Rm. 429
Mason Hall. Please consult, your in-
structor and then sign the list in the
History Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
Language Exam for Master's Degree
in History, Feb. 22, 4-5 p.m., Rm. 429
Mason Hall Dictionaries may be used.
Sign the list posted in the History
Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
Foreign Visitors
Following are foreign visitors pro-
grammed through the International,
Starting
TODAY
MICHIGAN STATE
PREMIERE

Center who will be on campus this
week on the dates indicated. Program
arrangements are being made by Mrs.
Clifford Miller, Ext. 3358, International
Center.
Eric P.W. daCosta, Managing Direc-
tor, India Institute of Public Opinion
Ltd., New Delhi, India-Feb. 11-14.
Events
Guest Organist: Jerald Hamilton will
present an organ recital on Wed., Feb.
13, at 8:30 p.m. in Hill Aud. He will
perform compositions by Buxtehude,
Sweelinck, Haydn, J. S. Bach, Mozart,
Kent Kennan, Carl McKinley and Mar-
cel Dupre. His recital will be open to
the general public.
Placement
ENGINEERS: "Your Negotiations for
Employment" will be discussed by Prof.
John G. Young, Director, Eng. Place-
ment, Wed., Feb.- 13, and Thurs., Feb.
14, at 4:00 p.m. In Rm. 311, W. Eng. All
(Continued on Page 8)

i-
.. .... , - * Don't fiddle aroundx paying
those bills. stop in at either of
Ann Arbor Bank's campus offices
and open your special checking
Saccount. There's no minimum
balance and twenty checks cost
just $2.00.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
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