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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 10, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Poetry To Enhance APA Show

Violinist Describes Toscanini

2-6264
' Now

Shows at 7-2:50
4:50-6:50 & 8:55
Feature 30
Minutes Later

4

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really dangerous. After that it was
a joy to rehearse with him be-
cause we never knew what to ex-
pect."
If a musician made a mistake
Maestro would pretend to ignore
it but would get his "burning eyes"
which meant that he was angry.
"And when he was angry each
player thought he was looking di-
rectly at him!" Mischakoff chuckl-
ed.
Exclusive Rehearsals
It was not Toscanini but the
orchestra officials who would ad-
mit no one into the rehearsals to
watch and listen. "They were
afraid that Maestro's 'semi-viol-
ence' might cause a scandal. This
is unfortunate because his best
performances were his dress re-
hearsals. Maestro, who had a great
sense of stage presence, was always
a little inhibited in front of an
audience, curtailing his facial ex-
pressions and gestures to a mini-
mum. But in the final rehearsals
he was at his best," Mischakoff
noted.
"Unlike other conductors, the
audience never could tell when
Maestro' was nervous or angry.
Only his eyes told, and only the
musicians could see his eyes."
Mischakoff explained that Tos-
canini only rehearsed when it was
necessary. He did not consider
himself a school teacher, but a
conductor. His main concern was
in "the line of the piece"-the
whole effect, rather than in small
details.
Proud of Strings
"Maestro rarely changed my
bowings. He had great.respect for
me and my knowledge of the string
orchestra and always let me make
suggestions during rehearsal. He
was especially proud of the string
section of the NBC Orchestra and
tried to assist the string players
as much asshecould. (Toscanini
played the 'cello.)
He had the unique quality of
being able to unnoticeably hold
back the tempo in difficult string
.-ges so that every note could
be heard.
"I remember how Maestro tried
to understand modern music. His
apprentice Canteli would often
conduct Bartok or Hindemith and
Maestro would listen attentively
during the rehearsals but just
couldn't find any meaning in the
music. Yet, he sincerely wanted to
learn to appreciate the moderns!"
Memorization Easy
"Maestro always conducted from
memory, even in rehearsal. He was
very near-sighted and whenever
he had to check something in the
score he had to put the manu-
script right up to his eyes.
Mischakoff explained that, al-
though Toscanini was a fine musi-
cian, he was avery bad adminis-
trator. He didn't have the heart to
fire a musician, no matter how
poorly he thought his tone sound-
ed, because the player's wife and
children would lose their income.
His first chair men usually chose
the musicians who were added to
the orchestra; other people had to
handle the union dealings.
Concertmaster
Mischakoff, now concertmaster
of the Detroit Symphony Orches-
tra, listed the duties of a concert-
master. Before rehearsal he pre-
pares the bowings, notes danger
spots and checks dynamics for the
violin section and learns any violin
solos which might occur in the
piece.
During rehearsal ie is always
alert to make sure that the bow-
ings and dynamics are appropri-
ate, making corrections where
needed. In addition Mischakoff
performs oneconcerto each sea-
son with the Orchestra.
Mischakoff entered the St. Pe-
tersburg Conservatory in Russia
on a full scholarship at the age
of 10 and graduated six years later
with highest honors: a .gold medal,
and the Anton Rubinstein prize.
He is the youngest person to grad-
uate from that institution with
such distinction.

Lovers, lunatics and poetry will
enhance Trueblood Theatre this
week, when the Association of
Producing Artists presents Shake-
speare's imaginative romantic
comedy "A Midsummer Night's
Dream," Wednesday evening
through Sunday afternoon.
A play of exquisite fun and fool-
ery, "Dream" weaves three de-
lightfully distinct stories, trans-
cending the world of reality into
the realm of fancy.
The supernatural world is rep-
resented by Oberon and Titania,
to be played respectively by Ellis
Rabb and Rosemary Harris. Ellen
Geer will portray Peaseblossom,
the first fairy, and Clayton Cor-
zatte will be seen as Puck.
In the real world, the story of

the group of young lovers, De-
metrius (Jonathan Farwell) and
Hermia (Kate Geer), Lysander
(Edward Cambria) and Helena
(Laurinda Barrett), is played
against the royal court of Athens.
Theseus, Duke of Athens, will be
portrayed by Sydney Walker and
Egeus, father of Hermia, will be
played by Gordon Gould. Nancy
Heusel, a resident Ann Arbor ac-
tress, will appear as Hippolyta,
Queen of the Amazons, who is
bethrothed -to Theseus.
Will Geer, Keene Curtis, Ed
Flanders, Richard Woods, Larry
Linville and Rod Blandel will be
seen as the clown-actors who
furnish amusement with their ad-
ventures in the woods near Athens

and their presentation of the play
Pyramus and Thisbe.
Written by Shakespeare for a
court entertainment, the play, as
produced by the APA, has many
masque-like qualities, including an
abundance of music and dancing
and occasion for elaborate cos-
tuming.
Shakespeare Festival
"Dream" is the first presenta-
tion in the forthcoming Shake-
speare festival, sponsored by the
Professional Theatre Program.
"The Merchant of Venice" and
"The Tragical History of King
Richard the Second" will follow.
A single unit setting has been
erected on top of the open stage
of Trueblood Theatre for the APA
festival. Simple, but effective, the
set consists of a contemporary
adaptation of Elizabethan ele-
ments which can flexibly be em-
ployed as playing areas for all
three productions.
A curving stairway, a balcony
and varied platform levels upon
a raked floor will be used imagin-
atively to suggest many different
locales and backgrounds.
The set was executed by APA's
design technician Geoffry Brown,
who was production stage manager
during last fall's APA drama fes-
tival
Constructed in Ann Arbor under
Brown's supervision, the set will
change visually with the use of
colorful banners, tapestries and
decorative props, assembled by Ag-
nes A. Gordon, a PTP fellowship
student.
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FAIRIES AND LUNATICS-Titania and Peaseblossom console
Bottom in the APA's production of Shakespeare's romantic
comedy, "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Titania is played by
Rosemary Harris, Peaseblossom by Ellen Geer and Bottom by
Keene Curtis.
OBSERVATORY:

Astronomers
Take Picture
Of New Nova
Three University astronomers
are believed to have taken the
first spectrographic pictures of
a nova, an exploding star, found
earlier this week.
Prof. Dean B. McLaughlin of
the astronomy department and
two of his students, Charles and
Ann Cowley, recorded the nova
at 5 a.m. yesterday morning using
a 37-inch reflecting telescope at.
the Observatory.
The nova lies on boindries of
the Lyra and Hercules consella-
tions near the star Vega, several
hundredf to 2000 light-years from
the earth. It had been discovered
independently by an observatory
in Sweden and by Leslie Peltier,
an amateur astronomer in Ohio.
The University received notifi-
cation from the Harvard Obser-
vatory, the regular clearinghouse
for such information.
The nova, barely visible in the,
morning sky, has freed two clouds
of. gas traveling through space
at approximately 500 to 1000 miles
per second, he added.

s yc.

CINEMA GUILD pejen4u

TONIGHT at 7 and 9
RENE CLAIR'S
THE ITALIAN STRAW HAT
From the Farce by Eugene Labiche
Starring
A ALICE TISSOT --ALBERT PREJEAN
"The Funniest Film of All Time"
Plus SHORT: SUNDAY
Coming Next Week:
THE CAINE MUTINY
Luis Bunuel's VIRIDIANA
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

LARRY STM MARY MURPHY ED WARD ANDREWS-KAREN SlEEILE"KEVIN MCARTHY HODWARD MORI
WARREN SIU8Y AYE-WrittenbyMARION HARGROVE.'Directed by NORMAN .EWISON
in EASrMANCOLOR.-PANAV/siONO
Shows ..-----------------------
at I AS
1, 3, 5, 1 STARRING
7 9L------------
L--.. E

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Coming Starts
UESDAY TUESDA
MICHIGAN PREMIEiE
A Gold Seal Classic!*
To thos people who take uncommon pleasure in good
books, music and other works of art, we offer Sophocles'

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TIHE GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY
ANNOUNCES
200 SUBSCRIPTIONS AVAILABLE

immortal masterpiece !

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91

FOR ITS

SPRING 1963 SERIES
REALITY and CINEMA
A series of films illustrating
five cinematic approaches to reaulity
February 11
Expressionism
DESTINY
by Fritz Lang
March 4
Realism
THE CRIME OF M. LANGE
by Jean Renoir
March 25
Documentary
THE SILENT WORLD
by J. Y. Cousteau and Louis Malle

"A MEMORABLE AND
REWARDING EXPERIENCE."
-Cook,. World reI~gf

"LIFTS ITSELF ABOVE ANY EXPECTED OR
FAMILIAR LEVEL. COMPLETE AUTHEN-
TICITY! IRENE PAPAS IS MARVELOUS."
--Wimlan, ?od
"DIRECTOR TZAVELLAS HAS BROUGHT
FORTH THE SURGING EMOTIONS WITH
FLUID STAGING AND FINE PHOTOG.
RAPHY. HE PROVES THAT ITS POWER
AND ANGUISH CAN AFFECT AUDIENCES
TODAY. STRIKING AND BEAUTIFUL."
-Alper, Scurdory Review
"POWERFULLY POETIC PRODUCTION
AND PERFORMANCE ... LYRIC BEAUTY!"
-Zunser, Cue
**** "PLAYED IN A
CLASSICAL STYLE THAT
SUITS THE ACTION OF THE
ANCIENT DRAMA. IRENE
PAPAS MAKES THE EVENTS
OF THOSE ANCIENT TIMES

April 22
Expressionist Realism
THE LAST LAUGH
by F. W. Murnau
May 13

11

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