100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 17, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DDFOL

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

:0

;lee Club To Tour,
1ompete in Europe

TEACHING RESEARCH:
McKeachie Cites Lack of Usable Data

cĀ±

By JOHN BRYANT
The Men's Glee Club will tour
urope this summer, giving con-
rts in 18 cities during their
ve and one;-half week tour, the
ub's conductor, Prof. Philip Duey
iid yesterday.
The club will also participate in
ie International Male Chorus
ompetition at the eisteddfod, a
!elsh singing contest, in Llan-
D11en, Wales. Four years ago,
hile on their last trip to Europe,
ie club won the competition.
The itinerary includes: Italy,
reece, Yugoslavia, A u s t r i a,
zechoslovakia, Poland, West Ger-
.any, Luxembourg, France, Eng-

land and Scotland. It will leave by
plane June 7 and return July 15.
The club will perform their usual
type of program emphasizing
American music, Prof. Duey said.
"I have often heard Amercian
groups sing all-European programs
while in Europe, Prof. Duey com-
mented.."This is ridiculous. Euro--
peans want to hear American mu-
sic when they hear American
groups. When European groups
come here we expect them to per-
form their music, not ours."
The trip is being paid for out of
profits from glee club concerts and
records Prof. Duey added. "We are
not using any funds budgeted to us
by the University for the trip."
The eisteddfod is a number of
singing contests in various cate-
gories. There are approximately 20
entrants in the Male Chorus group,
Yale University's Glee Club being
the only other American entrant.
Each group must sing Palestri-
na's "Pueri Herbaeorum" and
"Dana-Dana," a Hungarian folk
song. In addition, the group must
sing a choral work written by a
composer of its own country. The
glee club's choice is "Whitman"
from Paul Creston's "Celestial Vi-
sions."
JATE STUDENTS
1 of asf il ve nta ri .

-0 Discuss

-Daily-Richard Cooper
PEACE CORPS REPRESENTATIVES-An interested student (left) approaches a booth manned by
(from left to right) Peace Corps recruiters Norman Shavin, Mitzi Mallina and Robert Gale, respec-
tively. The information booth was set up in the lower lobby of the Union as part .of an intensive
recruiting campaign. The representatives will also speak to fraternity, sorority and dormitory units.
Peace Corps To Seek New Members

By MICHAEL SATTINGER
What makes teaching effective?
Prof. Wilbert J. McKeachie,
chairman of the psychology de-
partment, said recently in a lec-
ture on learning and teaching
methods that the difficulty in an-
swering this question is in compil-
ing usable data from which to
draw conclusions..
He began work as a graduate
student to find such data. In ex-
periments since then, he has in-
vestigated the three basic types of
teaching leadership.
One is authoritarian leadership.
The instructor manages all class
discussion himself and grades the
students continually on their
knowledge.
Debate System
Another is the democratic style,
in which the class is run'on a dis-
cussion basis.
The third is the "laissez-faire"
method of teaching in which the
students work mostly on their own.
Prof. McKeachie has concluded
that the particular teaching pro-
cedure used by an instructor de-
pends for its effectiveness in part
on the personalities of both the
teacher and the student.
During the past several years,
his research has been directed to-
ward investigating these relation-
ships between teachers and stu-
dents, using French, mathematics
and psychology classes 'to get
more applicable data.

teaching.

DIAL 2-6264

* ENDS SATURDAY *
"PICNIC" Shown at
1:00-5:00 and 9:10
"EDDY DUCHIN STORY" Shown
at 3:00 and 7:10 Only

This experiment included 31 in-
structors and 1000 students.
"I don't think we have found
any final answers," Prof. Mc-
Keachie said.
Expectations
"A teaching method which might
work well in one college would not
work in another, simply because
of student habits and, motives.
"One must vary teaching tech-
niques to fit the goals of the class."
he continued. Discussion methods
may be better for developing crit-
ical thinking. However, discussion
is not an effective way of getting
across a great deal of information.

"A good lecturer is probably a
good information carrier. The dis-
advantage of books and teaching
machines is that they are usually
written for a mass audience.
The lecturer can also use, feed-
back from the class. If he sees
sleeping students or blank stares,
he can change his presentation
accordingly.
"Most students will not like any-
thing you do that's differeit," he
concluded.
Prof. McKeachie spoke in con-
nection with the Medical School
lecture series on learning and
teaching.

U* PoVerty
Challenge approved the "Chal-
enge of Poverty in America" yes-
erday as the topic for their next
eries.
Elizabeth Nusbaum, '66, was
ected temporary chairman to or-
anize the series, which is slated
or the spring semester.,

I

UNERGRADL

GRADUATE STUDENTS and FACULTY MEMBERS
THE ASSOCIATION OF PRIVATE CAMPS
. . .comprising 350 outstanding Boys. Girls. Brother-Sister
and Co-Ed Camps, located throughout the New England, Mid-
dle Atlantic States and Canada.
...INVITES YOUR INQUIRIES concernlnq summer employment as Head
Counselors. Group Leaders, Specialties, General Counselors.
Write, Phone, or Cal in Person
Association of Private Camps - Dept. C
Maxwell M. Alexander, Executive Director
SS West 42nd Street, OX 5-2656, New York 36, N. Y.

By PHILIP SUTIN
Acting National Concerns Editor
Eight representatives of the
Peace Corps will conduct an in-
tensive recruiting campaign next
week including shorter placement
tests for prospective applicants be-
ginning Monday.
The drive is part of an experi-
mental program of the corps which
is seeking to fill the increasing
demands for volunteers made by
underdeveloped countries, Norman
Across
Campus
Dr. Harold Hillenbrand, secre-
tary of the American Dental Asso-
ciation, will address the Dental
School's honors convocation at 8
p.m. today in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
Psychic ..
Prof. Edward S. Bordin of the
psychology department will lecture
on "Psychic Processes in Free
Association" at the Psychology
Colloquium at 4:15 p.m. today in
Aud B.
Housing. .
The sixth annual off-campus
housing conference will be held
in the SAB today.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES

I,

CINEMA GUILD and the
DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
present the
First
Ann Aror
Film Festival
Thursday-Sunday, May 23-26
Separate programs at 7 and 9
SINGLE ADMISSIONS: 50 cents

Shavin, a special assistant of the
corps's Public Information Divi-
sion, said recently.
Three recruiters arrived yes-
terday and set up a public infor-
mation booth on the corps in the
lower lobby of the Union. The
group and five others who will
arrive Sunday will address frater-
nities, sororities and dormitory
units.I
Shorter Test
The new placement test - one
hour long instead of the current
four-hour examination-will be
given in Rm. 3C of the Union. The
exact testing schedule is available
at the Peace Corps booth.
Shavin said the new examina-
tion is experimental. Besides the
shortened length of the examina-
tion, the results will be returned
to the applicant within two weeks
instead of the current several
month delay.
The Corps will expand to 9000
volunteers by the end of the year,
he noted. Five thousand are cur-
rently on duty or in training and
the corps is looking for 4000 more
to train this year.
Corps to Train
"The applicant does not have
to bega specialist. The corps is
looking for liberal arts graduates.
He does not even have to know aj
foreign language; the corps will
train him," Shavin declared.
However, the volume of applica-
tions will not force a lowering of
standards, he asserted. "If the
standards are lowered, the corps
will destroy its usefulness," Shav-
in noted.
Every country that currently
has volunteers is asking for two
to three times their number and
some- countries that have asked
for them have not received anyone,
he noted.
Two Types
The countries ask for, essen-
tially two types of volunteers,
Shavin said. The first is teaching
in virtually every field from the
standard academic subjects ;and
the arts to basic technical skills
such as plumbing installation.
The second field is rural com-
munity development. Corpsmen
work in rural areas helping the
local personnel construct and de-
- - - -

more applicable data.

TECHNICOLOR* ~t~I~&A A ~

chows Today
6:50-9:05

--va irnbinraik
nLma kA I lavicg

DIAL
8-6416

' . BETTY FIELD'"SUSAN STRASBERG* CUFF ROBERTSON,
ROSALIND RUSSELL
*AND*

NMOMM.

velop new facilities, he explained.
Agricultural advances are empha-
sized, he noted.
Training Centers
Fifty college campuses have
served as training centers for the
corps. The University has sent two
groups of volunteers to Thailand
and Michigan State University has
trained one for Nigeria.

TOR APARTBY1THEIR LOES... UNITED BY THEIRHATES!
THE AMAZINGeSTORY OF A STRANGE, STRANGE FAMILY COMES TO THE SCREEN!

Thrilling true-life
story...set to his
own magic
melodies!

Joseph E. Levine in associationwi thEly Landau andJackJ. Dreyfus,Jr. presents
KATHARINE HEPBURNIRALPH RICHARDSON
JASON ROBARDS jR.I DEAN STOCKWELL ONE OF THE
in Eugene O'Neill's TEN BEST
LONG DAY'S JOURNEY INTO NIGHT OF THE YEAR'
Bosey Crowther, N.Y. Times
produced by orected by - Abe Weiler, N.Y. Times
ELY LANDAU/SIDNEY LMET Allon cook, world Tele. b Son
An Embassy Pictures Release Recommended for mature audiences

butiaUĀ®

.

I'

LUCIEU
COLOR By TECHNICOLOR'l
REX THOMPSON " JAMES WHITMORE
"N NE H0URS T0,RAMA,*

COLUMBIA PICTURE'~-:'"

r. n auee-.n.

* SUNDAY' ~ "NINE HOURS TO RAMA"
IA

!_

Series Ticket (all 8 shows):

$2.50

The best in domestic and Canadian
Experimental Cinema!
PLUS SPECIAL PROGRAMSM
ANN ARBOR FILM MAKERS
8MM FILM FESTIVAL
EXTENSIONS by MILTON COHEN
and other exciting events
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM'

Congregational Disciples E & R Stu-
dent Guild, Cost Luncheon Discussion:
"Wrap-Up," Noon; picnic-transporta-
tion to Hudson Mills Park, 3 p.m.; May
17, 802 Monroe;
a " E
Mich. Christian Fellowship, May 17,
7:30 p.m., Union. Speaker: C. E. Hum-
mel, field dir., Inter-varsity Christian
Fellowship, Chicago.
U. of M. International Folk Dancers,
Dance Meeting, May 21, 8 p.m., 1429
Hill.
Voice Political Party, Pre-SDS Con-
vention Caucus. Everyone interested in
attending the summer convention as a
delegate should attend, there will be
discussion of SDS national organization
& national-local program for next year,
May 17, 8:30 p.m., 536 S. Fourth Ave.
Everyone welcome.

Dial 5-6290
u Starts TODAY

C'

i_

: .

Laugh?

Don't wait any longer
h~
;x .*

i

We thought we'd need federal marshals for last night's laugh
riot at Trueblood Auditorium. Our only worry is that it happens

again tonight at 8:00. Please try to laugh softly so we can
the roof on the Frieze Building.
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
present
Jack G. O'Brien's wild farce

keep

to rent a

a

A

of

Matter
Syle

SAFE
DEPOSIT BOX
You'll feel much safer when your Im
portant papers and valuables are se.
cured against fire, lossiand theft. Cost
-just pennies a day.
Don't take chances
with your travel money - carry
AMERICAN EXPRESS
TRAVELERS CHEQUES
Prompt refund if lost or stolen,
Accepted everywhere. Cost-.
just a penny a dollar.
ANN
hT DDA"

I

Excellent seating tonight $1.00
Seating tomorrow, too $1.00

On second. thouaht. let vourself aio.

'X

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan