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May 12, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-12

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THEMICHIGANDAILY

SPIRITUAL VACUUM:
Sellin Views French Writing'

Program Notes

OXFORD PROJECT:
Assembly Announces Details of Co-ops

y MARILYN KORAL
lilemma of modern man,
tual vacuum, is something
world and literary history:

no

the burden of a

1

A

ier Sees

B ias Effect

The gross national p r o d u c t
would be increased by about $20,
billion if racial discrimination in
education and hiring practices
were eliminated, 'Prof. William
Haber, chairman of the economics
department, said' recently.
The American Negro has con-
tributed to economic progress by
providing "an important labor re-
serve at crucial times [in our his-
tory," Prof. Haber said. "But his
contributions would have been
even greater if equality of oppor-
tunity had been available in train-
ing, education and- jobs."
Speaking at centennial observ-
ances of the Emancipation Procla-
mation at Wayne State University,
he said, "we are ,.not quite rich,
enough to afford such waste, apart
from the matter of human dignity
and status which is basic to our
creed."
Three Spurts
Haber noted that three spurts -in
the Negro's economic progresshave
been closely related to the levels
of employment in the general
economy:,
1) World War I, when the labor
shortage- suddenly opened non-
agricultural jobs.
2) The cessation of European
immigration. in the mid 1920's,
which enabled the Negro -to move
into jobs in factories, mines and
transportation heretofore filled by,
immigrants.:
3) The "forward m o v e m e n t
across the board" in World War II
when jobs in semi-skilled and
skilledcrafts first became avail-
able and gains were retained and
expanded in the economic boom
between 1945 and 1955.
Lower Rungs
Negro workers today are "still
on the lowest rungs of the occu-
pation scale," but are entering
skilled jobs, professions, civil ser-
vice and higher education, Prof.
Haber said.
United States colleges and uni-,
versities contain 233,000 Negroes,
as compared with 128,000 in 1954.
This is an increase of 82 per cent.
White students have increased at
a rate pf only 55 per cent for the
same period..,

creative elite, but of all men, Prof.
Eric Sellin of the University of
Pennsylvania said yesterday.
Speaking on "French Literature
in the Cold War," he noted that
"a cataclysmic schism- has taken.
place separating all preceding ages
from the 20 years since 1945.".┬░For
the first time artists And thinkers
all, over the world are concerned
because the future of,civilization
is in serious jeopardy.
Literary movements in postwar
France have, demonstrated this
universal concern. "Sartre's devel-
oping concept of existentialism did
not so much foster defeatism as
find a cocked ear on the part of
those who were spiritually shell-
shocked from World War II," Sel-
lin saitd.
Sense of Absurd-
An aspect of modern French
literature particularly reflected in
the works of Sartre and Camus is
the sense of the absurd, he added.
"This approach to life was not
invented by Sartre and Camus;-it
just happened to. find its. fruition
in a period " when history provided'
most of mankind a position from
which to sense the absurd. Sartre
and' Camus are not the leaders,
but rather the spokesmen," he
said.
Sellin claimed the climate of the
post-war period lent itself to "to-
tal theatre," expression of the
total absurdity of the human con-
dition. Ionesco, Adamov and Genet
exploited man's ludicrousness,
which was illuminated by the war.
in "Waiting ;For Godot," Samuel
Becket implied that the hapless
animal man does not even have
the possibility for suicide, he ex-
plained.
Beyond the notion of the ab-
surdity of man's condition, Sellin
went on to describe the "natural"
aspect of current French litera-
ture.
Reverence on Objects
Poets in particular are writing
with a reverence and dependence
on natural objects. Sellin conclud-
ed that this movement, typified
in the poems of Jean Rousselot
and 'Grosjean, represents an un-
derstandable desire to "come back
to- the time when we didn't exist
in order to begin anew..
"One thinks he should turn to
,the primordial touchstone, cling
to the natural world because al-
though it is senseless it will sur-.
vive mankind, should mankind go
berserk. It will somehow elude the
erosion of time," Sellin said.
The rhythms of impending an-
nihilation are present in most of

PROF. ERIC SELLIN
*.. literary. change.
recent French .writing, notably in
the work of poets like Clancierx.
Sellin explained the peculiar
role of the artist in the Cold War:
"the provisional status of his work
puts emphasis not on 'millenial
survival but on the, moment of
composition, and thus places the
struggle for survival in a bold re-
lief."
Across
Campus,
Prof. Samuel D. Estep of the
Law School will adress the Fac-
ulty Seminar on Conflict Resolu-
tion on "The International Regu-
lation of Communications Satel-
lites" at 12:30 p.m. Monday in the
Kalamazoo Room of the Women's
League.
Economic Development
Prof. Kenneth E. Boulding of
the economics department will
speak on "Economic Development
as a Learning Process" at 8 p.m.
Monday in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the UGLI.
Medical Series"...
Prof. Stanford Ericksen of the
psychology department, head of
the Center for Research on Learn-
ing and Teaching, will speak in
the Medical School series on "The
Teaching of Facts, Concepts and
Generalizations" at 4 p.m. in the
Medical Science Bldg.

The Philadelphia Orchestra and
the University Choral Union will
present Haydn's "Creation" in the
fifth May Festival concert at 2:30
p.m. today. Soloists will be Adele.
Addison, soprano; John McCol-
lum, tenor, and Donald Bell, bari-
tone.
.The sixth concert, at 8:30 p.m.
today, will feature piano soloists
Rudolf and Peter Serkin. The pro-'
gram will include Buxtehude's
"Passacaglio," Mozart's "Sym-
phony No. 35" and "Concerto No.
id," and Beethoven's "Concerto
No. 4."
'Keyboards'.. .
The "Keyboards" program in the
University Television Center 'se-
ries will discuss and illustrate the
development of the harpsichord,
piano and organ at 1:30 p.m. today
on station WJBK-TV. Perform-
ances will be harpsichor'dist, El-
wood Deir, pianist Prof. Robert
Hord of the music school andor-
ganist Prof. Robert Glasgow of the
music school.
Symphonic Choir..*
The University Symphonic Choir
conducted by Prof. Maynard Klein.
of the music school willpresent
a public concert of music of the
last five centuries, at 8:30 p.m.
Thursday in Hill.Aud.
Louis Simpson .. .
Louis Simpson, author of "A
Dream of Governors," "The Ar-
rivistes" and "Good News of
Death," will present a public read-
ing of his poetry at 4 p.m. Mon-
day, in Aud. A.
Czech Music
Musicologist Edith Vogl of Har-
vard' University and Wheaton Col-
lege, will speak 'on."Czechoslovak-
ian Music in the 18th Century" at
4:15 p.m. Thursday in Lane Hall
Aud.
Kabuki Group...
The Kabuki Music Study Group,
directed by Prof. William P. Mali
of the music school, will give a,
public concert at 8:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday in Rackhan Lecture Hall.
Five Jap nase instruments will be
featured: the shamisen, the kotsu-
zumi drum, the otsuzumi drum,
the taiko stick drum and the bam-
boo and noh flute.
Renaissance...
The German Club will present
a lecture-recital "Renaissance Mu-

sic at the Court of Munich" by
Prof. Ingo Seidler of the Ger-
man department at 8 p.m. Tues-
day in Aud. A. The program will
include music performed by the
"Renaissance Choii" and an in-
strumental consort.

LOUIS SIMPSON
.reads poetry
COMMUNISM:
SGC Plans
To Present
Two Films
Student Government Council
will present two films, "The Price
Is Youth" and "Communist En-
circlement" at 8 p.m. Monday in
the 3rd Floor Conference Rm. of
the Michiga Union.
The two films, describing the
theory and practices of commun-
ism,' have been shown in Michigan
public schools.
SGC is showing the films with
the '"purpose of seeing if they
factually and realistically describe
communism," according to SGC
Executive'Vice-President ' Edwin
Sasaki, Grad.
"We want to see whether the
films are propaganda or fact," he
said.
The films, prepared by private
groups, have been shown in the
Hamtramck public schools at the.
request of Rep. Richard A. Guzow-
ski (D-Detroit), as part of an
anti-Communist program.

By KAREN MARGOLIS
University women living in Ox-
ford Project Cooperatives next
year will pay $650 for room and
board by assuming house-keeping
and cooking responsibilities, Joyce
Prosser, '64Ed, Assembly Associa-
tion housing chairman, announced
recently.
Fifty per cent of the 30 women
living in each co-op will be fresh-
men, she added.
Petitioning for temporary offi-
cers for the co-ops will be extend-
ed until noon Friday in Rm. 1511
SAB. The officers chosen will pre-
side until the individual houses
set up constitutions in the fall.
Interviewing
Interviewing will take place next
Saturday for presidents, vice-pres-
idents, secretary-treasurers, social
chairmen, work chairmen and food
chairmen.
Describing the physical layout
of the new co-ops, Miss Prosser
explained that double rooms will
have trundle beds which can be
stacked or moved around, while
other rooms will have bunk beds.
All closets, desks and dressers will
be built-in.
r Inside walls will be neutral
colors to allow the maximum in
decorating possibilities, she added.
Laundry
Laudry facilities will include
one washer and dryer for each
house, Other features include cor-
ridor telephones, luggage. storage
space, library and co-ed lounges.
Dining areas will be converted to
study rooms in the evenings.
Seeley House of Mary Markley
Hall and Geddes and Cheever co-
ops will be located in the co-oper-
ative project. Other house names
will be determined by the Regents
from a list of names of outstand-
ing deceased Universitygraduates
submitted by Assembly.
Explaining the duties of each of
the officers, present president of
Union. Extends
Guest Pol icy
The Board of Directors of the
Michigan Union has extended
guest privileges for check cashing
and for use of the bowling alley
to all faculty members and women
students upon presentation of cur-
rent faculty or student identifica-
tion cards, Union President Ray-
mond L. Rusnak, '64, announced
yesterday.
The swimming pool and billiard
room also have been opened to
male faculty members. The new
policy is effective today.
ENJOY THE WONDERFUL
HONDA'50'
Fe NEW WORIDof FUN
People around the world are enjoying
this new idea in low-cost, high-fun
transport atn.Upto 200dmies per
gallon and easier to ride than ,a
bicycle.
TRY IT-you'll buy it!
HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281

served every day,
usually sit-down
cafeteria style, she

and they are
rather than
noted.

Cheever co-op Jean Berutti noted
that the work chairman assigns
jobs based on the class schedules
and insures that the jobs are car-
ried out. She receives four hours'
time credit for this office.
Seven Hours a Week
At Cheever, the residents find'
that little over seven hours' work
per person per week is necessary,
she added. If someone does not
fulfill her duty, she receives a
notice, a warning and then a
penalty job.
Each person keeps a job for a
semester and jobs can be traded
on a temporary basis, she ex-f
plained.
The food chairman coordinates
meal planning, checks food sup-
plies and keeps track of people in
kitchen jobs. .Three meals are

Contmuous
FSom ' .

DIAL
8-6416

"OEOF THE
YEAR'S 10BESTI
N. Y.7mes/N.Y.Herald-Tribune
IRENE PAPAS
PRODUCED AND DIREICTED
MICHAEL CACOYANNIS
HONORED AT FOUR 1962'
EUROPEAN FILM FESTIVALS!,
SHOWS AT 1:00-2:55
4:55-7:00 AND 9:00

The Oxford Project is divided
into apartments and suites, with
apartments designed f o r four
women'and suites with two rooms
and a kitchen. In addition there
is a special dormitory type struc-
ture for those freshmen in the
program.
Council Chooses
New Executives
The Engineering Council has
announced the following new of-
ficers as a result of its May 2 elec-
tion:, Warren Uhler, '64E, presi-
dent; Richard Munt, '64E, vice-
president; George Johnson, '64E,
treasurer; William Harris, '63E,
recording secretary; and Ron Mac-
Ritchie, '64E, corresponding secre-
tary.

Dial
.a

1 2-6264

FEATURE STARTS..
15 MINUTES -LATER
ITN DEBBIE!
IN THE

i..DA I L Y OFFICIA ULEI
n" v" "v rx:"".Y"' :{a~ ar"ZF"};::r~~,tva ::{tf. .n7}". 1 sr f.wvt.,. i ..>v..: :

CINEMA GUILD and
THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
PRESENT
THE FIRST ANN ARBOR
MAY 22-26

I

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
SUNDAY, MAY 12
Day Calendar

THE BEST IN DOMESTIC AND
CANfDIAN EXPERIMENTAL FILMS.
ARCH ITECTURE AUDITORIUM
WATCH FOR PROGRAM ANNOUNCEMENTS

PLAYS LIVELIER! STAYS LIVELIER! LOWER IN COST!

2:30 p.m.-Univ. Musical society Sev-
entieth Annual Ann Arbor May Festival
-Thor Johnson, conductor; Univ. Chor-
al Union; Adele Addison, soprano; John
McCollum,. 'tenor; and Donald Bell, bari-
tone: Hill Aud. Tickets on sale at Hill
Aud. Box Office 1-8:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.-Bureau of Industrial Rela-
tions and Graduate School of Bus. Ad-
min.-Workshops. on Programmed Learn-
ing and Teaching Machines-Registra-
tion: Mich.'Union.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild -
Brigette Fossey and George Pouj oly in
Rene C16ment's "Forbidden Games";
short, Mack Sennett farce "Half Back
of Notre Dame": Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Univ. Musical. Society Sev-
entieth Annual Ann Arbor May Festival
-Eugene Ormandy, conductor; Rudolf
Serkin, pianist; and Peter Serkin, pian-
ist: Hill Aud.

BRAIDED RACKET
STRING

ASmAWAT VANTAGE
For Tournament Play
Approx.;Stringing Conl
Tennis...........$ S
ARnAWAY PRO-FECTED
For Club Play
Approx. Stringing Cost
Tennis...,.......7
Badminton.......6
AsNAWAY MULTI-PLY
For Regular Play
Approx. Stringing Cost
'Tennis..........$8S

Arbor, or at Tice's Men Shop,.1107 S.
Univ. Ave., Ann Arbor.
Assembly for Grads: At 4:30 p.m. in
area east of Stadium. Marshals will
direct grads to proper stations. If siren
indicates (at intervals from 4:00 to 4:15
p.m.) that exercises are to be. held in.
Yost Field House, grads should go di-
rectly. there and be seated by Marshals.
Spectators:
Stadium: Enter by Main St. gates
only. All should be seated by ,5 :00 p.m.,
when procession enters field.
Yost Field House: Owing to lack of
space only those holding tickets' can
be admitted. Enter on State St., oppo-
site McKinley Ave.
Grad Announcements, Invitations,
etc.: Inquire at Office of Student Af-
fairs.
Commencement Programs: To be dis-
tributed at Stadium or Yost Field.House.
Distribution of Diplomas: If the exer-
cises are held in the Stadium, diplo-
mas for all grads except the School of
Dentistry, the Medical School, Flint
Coilege and Dearborn Campus, will be
distributed' from designated stations
under the east stand of the Stadium,
immediately after the exercises. The
diploma distribution stations are on the
level above the tunnel entrance.
If the exercises are held in the Yost
Field House, all diplomas except those
of the School of Dentistry, the Medical
School, Flint College and Dearborn
Campus, will be distributed from the
windows of the Cashier's Office and the
Registrar's Office in the lobby of the
Admin. Bldg., following the ceremony.
Diplomas may be called for until 9:00
p.m. on this day.
Doctoral degree candidates who quali-
fy for the PhD degree or a. similar de-
gree from :the Grad School and WHO
ATTEND THE COMMENCEMENT EXER-
CISES will be given a hood by- the
Univ. Hoods given during the ceremony
are all Doctor of Philosophy hoods.
Those receiving a doctor's degree other
than the PhD may exchange the PhD
hood for the appropriate one at the
Grad School booth. under the E. Stand,
immediately after the ceremony, or at
hoiers Da~iMag J2.
MOTHER'S DAY
Michigan Union
Main Dining Room
Serving Noon and Night
For reservations phone 662-4431

the office of' the Secretary, 2564 Admin,
Bldg., on Mon., June 10, and thereafter.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting of
May 8, 1963
Approved: Student Health Insurance
Plan for 1963-1964:
Adopted: That Student Government
Council authorizes an increase in the
size of Cinema Guild Board from 10 to
11 members,
Appointed: Persons recommended by
Interviewing and Nominating Commit-
tee to Student Government Council
related' boards.
Adopted: The following changes in the
Operating Procedures of Student Gov-
ernment Council:
1) Remove section 2 of Part IV of The
Election of Officers.
2) Remove section 5 of Part IV The
Election of Officers. These items are
dependent upon the passage of the
new plan for Student Government
Council.
3) Add IX Duties of Officers: The
President shall be the chief executive'
of the Student Government Council.
The Executive Vice-President shall co-
ordinate all legislations. The Adminis-
trative Vice-President .shall supervise
all committees and boards. The Treas-
urer shall keep the financial records
and supervise all publicity.
(Continued on Page 8)

CLIFF ROBERTSONII;DAVID JANSSEN TfcrnIoLeR
* WEDNESDAY 0

WILLIAM HOLDEN
KIM NOVAK
" PICNIC"

, AND 0

TYRONE POWER
KIM NOVAK
"The Eddy Dunchin Story"

I 7 - ' --' ~WA

s y.

CINEMA GUILD praeent

General Notices
*Students: If you need to order a
transcript .without grades for the pres-
ent semester, you are urged to call in
person at Rm. 515 Admin. Bldg. not
later than May 28.
*-Does not apply to students in Law
and College of Engineering.
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
June 8, 1963
To be held at 5:30 p.m. either in the
Stadium or Yost Field House, depend-
ing on the weather. Exercises will con-
clude about 7:30 p.m.
All grads as of June 1963 are eligible
to participate.
Tickets:
For Yost Field House: Two to each
prospective grad, to be distributed from
Mon., May 27, to 12:00 noon on Sat.,
June 8; at Diploma Dept.,, 555 Admin.
Bldg. Office will be closed Thurs., May
30 and Sat., June 1.,
For Stadium: No tickets necessary.
Qhildren not admitted unless accom-
panled by adults.
Academic Costume: Can be rented at
Moe Sport Shop, N. Univ. Ave., Ann

t

last times tonight at 7 and 9
REN E CLEMENT'.S
FORBIDDEN GAMES
Brigitte Fossey-George Poujouly
"A horrifying film,
out of the ordinary vein"
--Saturday Review

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LE N'SBUFE

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GRAND PRIZE, VENICE
ACADEMY AWARD
NEW YORK CRITIC'S AWARD

CAFETERIA STYLE
RESTAUIRANT

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