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May 05, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

fSTTIMAY- WtAV, K 1,0417

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5

ALEXANDER RUTHVEN:
Past 'U' President Publishes Memoirs

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CINEMA GUILD preset

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(Continued from Page 1)

"Our basic criterion for judging
an article for Generation is not
whether it belongs to a school of
writing which we happen to like
but whether we feel that the ar-
ticle is good," he said.
Personal Taste
"What makes a work 'good' is
impossible to define. In the end,
our personal taste must make the
final judgment."
He also does not feel an obliga-
tion to judge Generation material
on the basis of campus taste. "We
make an effort to publish some
work in various categories such as
music, drama, poetry and prose so
as to satisfy demand for these
forms, but we judge articles only
on our own views."
Herrick agreed with the maga-
zine article's point that a univer-
sity can aid writing on the cam-
pus with more creative writing
courses and writers-in-residence.
Encourage Development
These factors may not directly
influence writing, Herrick notes.
However, they will encourage the
development of atmosphere in
which campus writers may express
themselves.
The article also called attention
to the current trend toward neo-
romanticism in college writing.
Calling this valid, he pointed to
the last issue of Generation as an
example.
"The works are romantic but
quietly so and lack the imaginary
quality of a Superman comic
book," Herrick said.
However, he does not attribute
this trend toward romanticism to
any prejudice on the part of col-
lege magazine editors. "In the case
of Generation, almost all of the
writing submitted was in this ro-
mantic genre."!

ORVILLE FREEMAN
... outdoor recreation

Secretaries
To Address
Conference
Secretary of Agriculture Orville
L. Freeman will discuss recent de-
velopments in outdoor recreation
and research at 9:45 p.m. tomor-
row in Rackham Lecture Hall.
His speech will begin a three-
day national conference on out-
door recreation research co-spon-
sored by the United States Bureau
of Outdoor Recreation and the
University.
Secretary of the Interior Stew-
art L. Udall will address the con-
ference on the topic of the federal
outdoor recreation program at a
6:30 p.m. banquet Tuesday in the
Women's League Ballroom. Tickets
for the banquet may be purchased
at the League.
Remaining conference sessions
will be restricted.to conference at-
tendance because of reduced seat-
ing capacity.

is a better method of coordinat-
ing their activities than regimen-
tation under a single board."
The plan of a single state board
looks well on the organization
chart, but hinders experimenta-
tions with new and improved pro-
grams, he claims.
Ruthven writes that the current
method of electing Regents is no
longer satisfactory since the posi-
tions have gained political impor-
tance, and recommends that the
governor appoint the men. with
confirmation by the Senate.
"One chore the president of a
state school can never neglect is
the task of convincing the Legisla-
ture each year that he knows what
is best for his school. The task is
usually difficult, often frustrating,
not seldom irritating and over a
period of years discouraging."
Individuals
Legislators are not stupid, they
are "individuals," he says.
. While honesty may be the
best policy in dealing with the Leg-
islature, it is a ridiculous system
that requires a state university
president, honest or otherwise, to
battle each year with smooth and
well-equipped lobbyists of power-
ful interests for funds to support
one of our most important social
responsibilities."
Pfnister Gives
Rat ings' V al ues
If used to help a teacher adapt
techniques to his personality, stu-
dent ratings of their teachers have
"high face validity," Prof. Allen
0. Pfnister of the Center for the
Study of Higher Education said
recently.
"While students may not be
able to assess how much informa-
tion and background the instructor
has, they. can at least assess the
extent to which the information
seems to be getting across," he
said.
Also helpful are "inter-class vis-
itations" between teachers. But
both student ratings and inter-
class visitations "must emphasize
helping the'"instructor to reflect
carefully on his own effectiveness
in the classroom," he warned.

Ruthven speaks out against the
branch system of University ex-
pansion, explaining that he kept
the Regents from establishing the
Flint Branch for the last eight
years of his presidency, only to see
it set up as soon as he retired.
"It seemed to me then, as it does!
now, that it would be much better
to organize independent colleges
in desirable locations than to mul-
tiply the problems of the adminis-
trators in Ann Arbor.
Flint Flop?
"In my judgment . . . the Flint
branch will not reach its full po-
tentialities as an institution of
higher education serving its area
and the state until someone ties
off its umbilical cord."
Across
Campus
Prof. Kenneth Boulding of the
economics department will speak
on "Thomas Malthus as a Moral
Theologian" at 7:30 pm. tomor-
row at the Ecumenical Center.
Hearing Research..
Prof. Merle Lawrence, director of
the Kresge Hearing Research In-
stitute, will speak- on "Hearing Re-
search Problems and the Engineer"
at 4 pm. tomorrow in Rm. 311 of
the West Engineering Bldg.
Smorgasbord...
An international smorgasbord
will be given at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m.
today at the Newman Club. Tickets
are available' at the International
Center. The smorgasbord is spon-
sored by the International Student
Association and University nation-
ality clubs. Half of the money rais-
ed will go to the World Univer-
sity Service.
DIAL 2-6264
Shows at 1-3-5-& :05
Feature 8 Minutes Later

Ruthven notes that academic
freedom will never be fully achiev-
ed, but the fight for it must con-
tinue by administrators and teach-
ers regardless of cost. "Occasional
skirmishes will be lost, but pacif-
ism in this struggle will only im-
pede the war effort and will gain
the respect of no one."
On the campus, Ruthven admits
that it has often been called an
"architectural museum" but he
points out that this shows that
the buildings have been designed
to meet the uses for which they
were to serve.
Poor Support
He cites poor alumni support in
the past as confusion in aims and
a cumbersome organization in the
central office of the Alumni As-
sociation.
He also explains his problems
with the "red scare" on campus
and how he treated the situation
with moderation.
In closing he points to three
failures and mistakes which he
regrets. They were his inability to
limit the size of the University, to
halt increases in student fees,and
to develop a "sensible" method for
allocating state funds for higher
education.

The greatest anthology of the silent screen's
best comedies and serials
NEXT WEEK
BORN YESTERDAY
FORBIDDEN GAMES

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Last Times Tonight at 7 and 9
DAYS OF THRILLS
AND LAUGHTER
Laurel and Hardy
Charlie Chaplin - Mack Senneft
Douglas Fairbanks - Ruth Rolland
Ben Turpin - Mabel Normand

5

ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM

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STARTS
TO DA

HAE EYERU
WITNESSED
BEFORE WA
PREPAREDR
SUCH SHER
S TABBING

Shows at 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:10-9:20

Program Notes

Paul Roche, English poet and
novelist, will read selections of his
own poetry as well as translations
of Greek dramas at 8 p.m. today
in the Multi-purpose Room of the
UGLI. The program is sponsored
by the Michigan Union Cultural
Affairs Committee.
Renaissance Music...
The Madrigal Singers and Re-
corder Quartet will perform in a
program entitled "Renaissance
Music at the Court of Munich" at
8 p.m. Tuesday in Aud A.
Freedom Singers-...
The Freedom Singers, a group
of former Student Non-Violent
Coordinating Committee voter-
registration workers, will sing

Gospel and freedom songs at 3
p.m. today at St. Andrews Epis-
copal Church. The group was or-
ganized by folksinger Pete Seeger
to raise funds for voter-registra-
tion drives in the South. Today's
appearance is sponsored by the
University Friends of SNCC.
Opera,. ..
Guest lecturer Donald Grout will
speak on "Opera in the Twentieth
Century" at 4:15 p.m. Thursday at
Lane Hall Aud. Eugene Ormandy,
conductor of the Philadelphia Or-
chestra, will address the Music
School Honors Assembly at 3 p.m.
Friday at Rackham Lecture Hall.
LeCorbusir*...
Prof. John Jacobus of the Uni-
versity of California will discuss
"LeCorbusier: Recent Works in
France and India" and show slides
illustrating his talk at 4 p.m.
Tuesday in Aud B.
Stratford ...
The Stratford Festival will pre-
sent Norman Campbell's produc-
tion of "The Mikado," opening
July 5 in the Avon Theatre, Strat-
ford, Ontario. The production is
scheduled for 45 performances,
ending on August 17. Five former
members of the Stratford Festi-
val's light opera company who will
be returning are Howell Glynee,
Andrew Downie, Irene Byatt, Anne
Linden and Maurice Brown.
Fierpont To Join
Trustees Board
Vice-President for Business and
Finance Wilbur K. Pierpont was
recently elected to the trustees
board of the Kresge Foundation,
Stanley S. Kresge, president of the
board, announced.

BE
CONFIDENT,
WITH
TAMPAX
INTERNAL
SANITARY,
PROTECTION

A vOMaNtiC
*RUND-Ti1E-WOERLP
MaNHunt
n'arri age on
wantsa
ron wit

Stay
even

cool, fresh
on difficult days

Research exhibits will be on dis-
play today at the annual Univer-
sity engineering exposition 'Tech-
nirama."
The displays will include dem-
onstrations on the laser, a new
night-amplifying device whose
beams can transmit communica-
tion, the IBM 7090 computer, the
mach 20 wind tunnel and other
research instruments.
In addition, industrial displays
will demonstrate the application
of principles acquired in research
to the problems of industrial de-
velopment.
Sponsored by the Engineering
Council, "Technirama" aims to
display "the handiwork of our
present-day engineers with a peek
into future possibilities," accord-
ing to Dean Stephen S. Attwood of
the engineering college.
Exhibits will be open from 1-5
p.m. in the engineering buildings
on both Central and North Cam-
puses.

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3 absorbencies
Package of 10.. 45%'
The VILLAGE
APOTHECARY
PRESCRIPTION CHEMISTS
OPEN 'TIL 11 P.M.
Closed Sundays
1112 S. University Ave.
Phone NO 3-5533
Delivery Service-Charge Accounts

She
just
wants a
MANf

Metro
GOdwyn
Mayer.. ,t,
iANAIYSION W*T1
an
MTROCOLOR ME
ST ARRING
DOLORES HUGH KARL
HART OBRIAN BOEHM
PAMELA KARL LOIS
IITIN MAWDEN NET.ETON

Screenplay by EVAN HUNTER " Directed by ALFRED HITCHCOCK " A Universal Releae
Based on Daphne Du Maurier's classic suspense storyL.

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"Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf"?
"idsummner Night's Dream"?.
."Ghosts"?
REID YOU MS:3-s4 SE AS.
"School for .Scandal"?,4 .
__________RESERVE NOW FOR THE 1963-64 SEASON!

. som OUT
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11

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GOT THE EXAM BLUES?

C/tee, ?(P!

Hear the

I

ANNUAL SPRING CONCERT
of the
MICHIGAN MEN'S GLEE CLUB

North University

DIAL 8-6416

Saturday, May 18
Hill Auditorium-8:30 p.m.

POSITIVELY
ENDS WEDNESDAY

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