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April 23, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-04-23

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

Ships of Seventh Fleet

Claim King
In Violation
Of Ruling

Khrushchev Politics in Italy Vote

Move

to Gulf

of Siam

In'-

'Precautionary'

Act

U.S. Debates
Intervention
In Laos War
Naval Units Stand By
For Further Orders
WASHINGTON 0P) - Some
"purely precautionary" moves by
United States 7th Fleet units to-
ward the Gulf of Siam area were
disclosed by defense authorities
yesterday as President John F.
Kennedy again reviewed the peri-
lous Laotian situation.
Informants described the plan-
ned movements as less than a
"show of force" and stressed that
the warships have not been ordered
Into the Gulf of Siam. They de-
scribed it as preparedness should
the military subsequently get
Washington orders to under take a
mission.
For the time being, United States
emphasis still was on diplomatic
efforts to prevent Laos from fall-
ing to the Communists.
It was understood that at yes-
terday's White House session the
President and the National Se-
curity Council studied latest re.
ports from Laos but made no de-
cision on United States military
intervention or display of force.
Adm. Harry Felt, commander of
United States forces in the Pacific,
has made a hurried trip to Thai-
land for what was described as
discussions with Southeast Asia
Treaty Organization officials at
SEATO headquarters in Bangkok.
In Washington, high adminis-
tration officials described as spec-
ulative reports that the 7th Fleet
would make a big display in the
Gulf 'of Siam.,
On the diplomatic side, Under-
secretary of State W. Averell Har-
riman arrived in Paris for further
efforts to prop up last year's 14-
nation Geneva agreement for a
neutral, independent Laos, free of
o u t s i d e interference. Whether.
Harriman might go on to Moscow
during his trip has not been de-
cided.
In Vientiane, the pro-Commu-
nist Pathet Lao charged yesterday
that rightist troops of Gen. Phou-
mi Nosavan had joined neutralists
on the strategic Plaine des Jarres,
scene of an uneasy truce.
The neutralist field command-
er Gen. Kong Le and rightist mil-
itary sources denied the charge
made in a Pathet Lao broadcast.
Western Allies
Try To Revive
Test Ban Talks
WASHINGTON (M-)-The United
States and Britain are looking
anew for a way to revive Soviet
interest in the long-deadlocked
nuclear test-ban talks, informed
sources disclosed yesterday.
The British are understood to
be interested in a possible foreign
ministers' meeting between Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk, Brit-
ain's Foreign Secretary Lord Home
and Russia's Foreign Minister An-
drei Gromyko on the test-ban.
The United States government
is less enthusiastic than the Brit-
ish over this idea, and Washington
sources said it is "premature" now
to say that a big-three foreign
ministers meeting will take place.
The United States view is that
- the Soviets should at some point
be .very much interested in a
treaty to outlaw atomic tests -
but that the Kremlin is not as

interested in abandoning testing
now.

S
t
i;
a
t
c

BIRMINGHAM W)-A police in-
spector pointed out the Rev. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. yesterday as
>ne of the Negro leaders who de-
ied a state injunction against
racial demonstrations in Birming-
ham.
King and 14 other demonstrators
were called before Circuit Judge
WV. A. Jenkins Jr. on charges by
the city that they violated Jenkins'
injunction, against desegregation
activities and thus are in contempt
of court. ,
At the outset of the hearing,
[enkins rejected three motions by
Arthur D. Shores, attorney for the
defendants. He asked that the
criminal be separated from the
civil contempt cases, that Jenkins
hear first the Negroes' request for
dismissal of the injunction and
that Jenkins continue the cases of
the original 15 defendants two
weeks to give attorneys time to
seek a writ questioning Jenkins'
jurisdiction.
The judge continued cases
against 40 other defendants to
May 6.
Meanwhile, the desegregation
campaign which started April 3
continued in downtown- Birming-
ham where Negroes tried unsuc-
cessfully to get service at white
lunch counters. There were no ar-
rests.
Police Inspector W. J. Haley,
first witness called by the city,
described marches held Good Fri-
day and Easter Sunday starting
from Negro churches.
Haley named King and the Rev.
Ralph D. Abernathy as leaders of
the march which came two days
after Jenkins' injunction April 10.
King had said that/the injunction
would be ignored. His attorneys
have asked United States district
court for an injunction.
Haley testified that no permits
had been issued by the city for
parades and that no request had
been received from Negro leaders
to "clear the boisterous and bel-
ligerent crowds which gathered."
The inspector said he had been
notified of the impending march.

By EUGENE~LEVIN
Associated Press News Analyst
ROME--Soviet Premier Nikita
S. Khrushchev has poked a finger
into Italian politics in the final
week of a general election cam-
paign for the second time in five
years, although Italian Commu-
nists profited little if at all from
his intervention of 1958.
Prospects seemed slim last night
that the views of the Soviet lead-
er expressed to the Milan news-
paper 11 Giorno would help his
Italian comrades at the polls next
Sunday and Monday any more
than his offerof a nonaggression
pact to Italy Just four days be-
fore the last general election. He
may ha-, e hurt them.
The obvious Soviet bid of 1958
to influence voting for a new par-
liament, a member of the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization, had
no visible effect. The Communists
barely gained. The governing
Christian Democratic Party did
better.
This time Khrushchev stressed
the possibility of nuclear reprisal,
along with praise for the Commu-
nist party as the only true sup-
porter of workers and peasants..
He said United States Polaris
subm rines arebeingasent into
the Mediterranean, "almost under
the walls of the Vatican," to draw
Soviet fire away from the United
States. He warned Italy would not
be spared atomic retaliation in the
event of war.
The 2remier praised Pope John
XXIII as a proponent of peace.
With 34 million Italians sched-
uled to vote, Khrushchev agreed
to answer written questions sub-
mitted to him by Il Giorno's di-
r-: tor, Italo Pietra.
The newspaper is an anti-Com-
munist leftist daily. It is owned by
an Italian government agency, the
Nationalr Hydrocarbons Authority,
but follows an independent editor-
ial line.
Immediate reaction to the inter-
view was slight.
Brief summaries were made
available to afternoon Italian
newspapers. The pro-Communist

Paese Sera put its story on page
1 under a single column headline:
"Khrushchev: I appreciate the
position of the Pope.'"
Other newspapers generally ran
their summaries inside.
The Paese Sera treatment indi-
cated the use that the Italian
Communist party planned to make
of Khrushchev's words, in effect
telling Italy's almost 100 per cent
Roman Catholic electorate that
the atheist Russian backs the Ro-
man Catholic ruler.
But there was much in the in-:
terview that could be ammunition
against the Communists. Il Giorno
highlighted a statement that there
could be no peaceful coexistence
between Socialist and bourgeois
ideologies.
It was a statement that Italian
Communists will be unable to rec-
oncile with their pledge that they
are a party dedicated to parlia-
mentary process - such as elec-
tions.
Khrushchev said the Commu-
nists are prepared to use violence
-although Le suggested that such:
means were being forced upon
them by the resistance of what he
called reactionary circles.
He defended the Kremlin's
crackdown on modernistic artists

and writers. This crackdown was
criticized last week by Italy's Com-
munist boss, Palmiro Togliatti,
who has several intellectuals
among his candidates for parli-
ment.
Khrushchev's decision to grant
the interview recalled a formal
note that Moscow sent Rome in
May 1958. The note offered a non-
aggression pact if Italy would
neutralize its Adriatic coast and
reject NATO missile bases. The
Italians turned down the offer.
Military Calms
Old, Jerusal em
JERUSALEM, Jordan Sector (M)
-Jordan's crisis left old Jerusalem
almost lifeless yesterday, with
movement limited to armed sol-
diers and a few tourists.
Military patrols kept the lid on
Jerusalem, Nablus, Jenin and Tul-
karen to prevent recurrence of
riotous demonstrations for ouster
of King Hussein and union of
the kingdom with Syria, Iraq and
Egypt in Egyptian President Gam-
al Abdel/ Nasser's projected New
United Arab Republic.

a
shirt's
the
thing
...only,
it's
a dress!

E r

GEN. PHOUMI NOSAVAN
... uneasy truce

W. AVERELL HARRIMAN
... further negotiations

World News RonedPs
By The Associated Press

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
PETITION
Name: Class
Address Tel.
Position Petitioning for:
Vice Pres. Secretary
President Treasurer
Committees: Areas of interest in order of preference:
1 Cultural & Arts 7. Hillezapo
2. Religious 8. Supper'
3. Social 9. 1
4. Publicity 10. Member
5. Newspaper 11. Interf
6. Special Events 12. Workshoi

11

WASHINGTON--A Negro's six-year battle to become an airline
pilot brought a Supreme Court ruling yesterday that states are free
to bar racial discrimination in hiring by interstate carriers. The Negro,
Marlon D. Green, is a former Air Force captain who has been seekingF
since 1957 to get a job with Continental Air Lines; Inc., of Denver. 1
*' * * *
WASHINGTON-Shortly after the release of 21 Americans from1
Cuban jails yesterday, the Justice Department announced the freeing
of two Cubans and a Cuban-American held in New York on sabotage
conspiracy charges. It appeared to be a swap something like the
Powers-Abel exchange.
- .- 4 *
. .l
OTTAWA-Liberal leader Lester B. Pearson took the reins as
Canada's 14th prime minister yesterday. His new defense minister,
Paul Hellyer, predicted the issue that frayed United States-Canadianz
relations-Canada's refusal to accept United States nuclear weapons-
would be solved in about a month.
MILAN-Soviet Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev was quoted yes-
terday as suggesting that West Berlin be given a neutral status like
that of Switzerland, Austria or San Marino. The suggestion was report-
ed by the Milan newspaper Il Giorno in a followup article on its Sat-
urday interview with the Soviet leader.
NEW YORK-Three more major producers yesterday abandoned
higher prices posted on steel plates in an aftermath of the recent in-
dustrywide markup on selected products.
-* * * *
PORT AU PRINCE, Haiti-Leaflets threatening a revolt against
President Francois Duvalier littered streets and yards of Port au Prince
Saturday. Listing May 15 as the4

ppin
Club
UJA
rship
faith
ps-

Music-Dance-
.Theater

'.

PETITION BLANKS AVAILABLE AT 'HILLEL OFFICE
1429 Hill Street

I

11

I

1V

SOFTBALL
PLAYERS
WANTED
For Internationol
Fast Ball League\
Phone 663-8127

MUJSKET
CENTRAL COMMITTEE PETITIONING
Now until Friday, April 26

I

full-skirted shirt'-dress in oxford
cloth, striped of blue, red or
green. By Country Miss. sizes
6 to 14. 12.98

petitioning for:

ASSISTANT GENERAL CHAIRMAN
PUBLICITY
TICKETS
PRODUCTIONS
OFFICE
PROGRAMS

LIGHTING.
CHOREOGRAPHY
MAKE-UP
USHERS
PROPS
COSTUMES
TREASURER

I a'

I

I

target date, they were signed
"United Revolutionary Forces."
PHILADELPHIA - Teamster
President James R. Hoffa faces
a major test of strength this week
when his leadership is challenged
by an insurgent group known as
the Voice of the Teamsters that,
seeks to take powerful Local 107
of the Teamsters Union and three
other regional locals into the AFL.-
CIO.
* * *
CAPE CANAVERALI--Machinists
employed by Boeing at Cape
Canaveral will strike their jobs at
the Florida missile base Wednes-
day at 6 am. (EST),* union of-
ficials announced last night. This
was the first break in nationwide
negotiations
NEW YORK-A continued rally
on the New York Stock Exchange
faltered yesterday as steels fell
back and the list closed mixed.
The Dow-Jones Averages showed
30 industrials down .67, 20 rails
up .77, 15 utilities down .04 and
65 other stocks up .11.
Now

rI

Jacobson's
cordially invites you
to visit its newly decorated
Bridal Roon, featuring an
exciting summer collection of
bridals, bridesmaids dresses,
and coordinating bead pieces
street floor

I

f

You may pick up your petitions at the Student Offices
of the Union, 2nd floor
DISCOUNT RECORDS.
IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE ONE OF ITS
GREAESTSALES
Choose from one of the most complete stocks in the country.
For mail orders add 20 cents per record for packing and
maling. Please list substitutes.

I

I

I
x
I.

2
i

ki x

ALL
PERIOD & VOX
BOXES

I-

$399

2 record sets

"'

3 record sets $499
-except operas-
ALL ARCHIVE &
DEUTSCHE
GRAMMOPHON
DISTINGUISHED IMPORTED
CLASSICAL SERIES

ALL
R. C. A. VICTOR
RECORDS
40% Off
Mono and Stereo
All EVEREST
CLASSICAL RECORDS
60% Off
Special Groups of
" ANGEL
" DECCA
" COLUMBIA
" FOLKWAYS
RECORDS
40% Off
THESE CAPITOL
SINATRA RECORDS

BETWEEN US GIRLS1
Your Hairdo
A clean healthy
head of hair is
Y _ frame for your
face. The style
you choose toI
wear can accent
your best fea-
tures or empha-
size the poorer
ones. A hairdo
t. also reveals
character and taste. Your hair,
style should be suitable for the
kind of life you live. It should do
something just for you not be an
imitation of someone else's -
whether she be a celebrity or your
best friend.

'. r11
<S> " $N
".1
r k4
4. \(f

II
:":i etiJ";t
:. F.y~r :"v. t

Were $5.98
Now $3.98
Were 6.98
MONO

1/3
OFF
Now 4.64
& STEREO

ALL
MERCURY
CLASSICS
50% Off
Mono and Stereo
All BACH GUILD
and VANGUARD
Classical C Folk Music
40% Off
Were 4.98 Were 5.98
Now 2.99 Now 3.59
ALL
RIVERSIDE
RECORDS
-JAZZ and FOLK-
40% Off
ALL
WESTMINSTER
50% Off
All TAP and ASCO
The Gold Age of Opera
$1.98 per record

F~ALL
PARLIAMENT
RECORDS
$1.19
Monaural only

I

the pastel silver shirt-dress of
wash and wear dacron and cot-
ton oxford cloth. It's ashift
with a madras belt. In palest

r i

shades of blue, maize
By Miss Pat. Sizes
13/14.

or pink.
5/6 to
10.98

I

Y I
.. ..
foral cotton shirt-dress with
a hemp belt. Defntely by
Country Miss. Yellow, Blue,

,

.4
.

Wee Small Hours
Swingin' Lovers
Dance With Me
Nice, and Easy
Swingdin'Session
All The Way
Swing With Me
No Return
Love and Thingsl

OFF

. "
r

ALL
Verve & Atlantic
- JAZZ -
40 % Off

All Kingston Trio
Mono-.-Stee

LWAWujALA IInI

I

a %fA

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