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March 16, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-16

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SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 1963

TWUV M r r U i .A vunAiwi s

______________________________________________________r____ .Ur. 1±*a . AX.r E Nt f i J 1U L Y

Accord Reached

On Treaty

Talks

Neutrals To Submit Joint Proposals
To Reopen Negotiations ot Geneva
GENEVA (M)-The eight non-aligned nations at the Geneva dis-
armament conference agreed yesterday on joint proposals for reviv-
ing nuclear test ban negotiations.
The eight delegations reached unanimous agreement on a mem-
orandum to be submitted to the full 17-nation conference next week.
Following a plenary session of the conference, the neutrals met
separately under the chairmanship of M. T. Mbu of Nigeria. As Mbu

r -
Bidault Says
No Stepdown
STEINEBACH, Germany ()-
Georges Bidault made it plain yes-
terday: he would rather leave Ger-
many than step down as a leader
of the anti-Gaullist underground.
After six days of virtual house
arrest and plenty of publicity, the
63-year-old former French pre-1
Mier remained a weighty problem
for French-German relations. But
no one seemed in very much of a
hurry. No Asylum
West German authorities warn-
ed Bidault would not be granted
asylum here unless he agrees to
drastic restriction of his political
activities, including a permanent
police escort. One of the main aims
in life for the French Secret Army
Organization in which Bidault
is a leader is to eliminate de
Gaulle.
But a precise outline of asylum
conditions will not be given Bi-
dault for another week, Bavariant
Interior Minister Heinrich Junker
R" Said. If Bidault doesn't like the
terms he may appeal to German
courts, possibly starting a pro-
tracted legal squabble over his
rights as a "political" refugee.
"I will certainly not trade poli-
tical activity for security," Bidault
said in an interview. "I am the
leader of the national resistance
council. I am the boss of it all.
Not Tired'
"There are comfortable and un-
comfortable decisions but one has
to do one's duty," he replied when
asked what he planned to do if
he is not permitted to continue
political activity from Germany.
'I am certainly not tired.
"I always have my eyes set on
the just cause, even if this leads
me to the end of the world."
The Bavarian interior minister
said that even if he is granted
asylum, Bidault might face c:x-
pulsion if his stay ran counter to
"important state political mat-
ters." The minister said, for ex-
ample, that this was possible if
Bidault proved to great a strain
on French-German relations.
World News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
PALM BEACH-President John
F. Kennedy announced a new move
yesterday that in effect will put
millions of young fathers beyond
the reach of the military draft.
The executive order which will
shift virtually all draft-eligible
fathers from class IA to class 3A.
Exceptions are doctors, dentists
and veterinarians, who will re- r
main in class lA even if they are
fathers. d
*
GREENWOOD, Miss.-Chester
F. Relyea, a United States Civil
Rights Commission staff lawyer,
reported yesterday he was arrest-
ed for disobeying racial segrega- t
tion rules at the' bus depot here. t
He said he was released without i
charge after 45 minutes in cus-v
tody.

emerged from the meeting, he told
newsmen:
"We have reached complete
agreement."
The neutral delegations' propos-
als will not be published or sub-
mitted to the full conference until
they have been explicitly approved
by each of the eight governments.
The neutral delegations have
been sharply divided for weeks on
whether and how to intervene in
the British-Soviet-United States
test ban deadlock. They reported
some progress Thursday in efforts
to draft compromise suggestions
to help get the negotiations mov-
ing again.
Mbu, former Mexican foreign
minister Luis Padilla Nervo and
Brazilian delegate Afonso Arinos
de Melo Franco were the main
advocates of joint action by the
neutrals. The other members of
the non-aligned group are Burma,
Ethiopia, India, Sweden and the
United Arab Republic.
The group's memorandum is
believed to contain detailed pro-
posals on how East and West can
resume negotiations on the in-
spection issue. The talks are dead-
locked because the Russians refuse
to discuss inspection procedures
unless the West first accepts three
annual inspections as a maximum.
The West in turn refuses to dis-
cuss the annual quota without first
nailing down the inspection pro-j
cedure.
One of the neutral delegates told
newsmen:
"We have concluded a docu-
ment yesterday which is now being
sent to our governments for final
approval. We expect the document
to be presented to the conference
at the middle or end of next week."
Realty Boards
Clarify Ethics
In Race Cases
WASHINGTON () - A realtor+
who sells a Negro family a home
in a previously all-white neigh-
borhood nio longer needs to fear
charges that he has violated his
professional code of ethics.
For the first time, the National1
Association of Real Estate Boards
has clarified this point in its 50-c
year-old code. It wasn't done byI
any change in the rules, but by a
specific case illustrating the wayE
article 5 should be interpreted, it
was learned yesterday.
Until 1950, article 5 read:
"A realtor should never be in-I
strumental in introducing into a
neighborhood a character of prop-
erty or occupancy, members of
any race or nationality or any in-
dividuals whose presence will
clearly be detrimental to property
values in that neighborhood."
In 1950, this was changed to
read:
"The realtor should not be in-<
strumental in introducing into a
neighborhood a character of prop-
erty or use which would clearly be<
detrimental to property values in
that neighborhood."
But although the change elim-
inated mention of "occupancy"
and "race" there is considerable
evidence that many local real es-
ate boards continued to reason
hat injection of a Negro family
nto an all-white neighborhood
would be detrimental to property
values.

Red Troops'
Withdrawal
Date Nears
WASHINGTON (M)- The ad-
ministration kept tight secrecy on
Cuban developments yesterday as
the deadline neared on Moscow's
promise to withdraw several thou-
sand of its troops.
Reportedly on orders from Pres-'
ident John F. Kennedy before he
left for Palm Beach, no executive
branch spokesman was comment-
ing on reports of a Soviet outflow
-or even saying when a Washing-
ton announcement would be made
or by whom.
A dispatch from Havana said
the departure of a big Russian
passenger ship which could carry
as many as 2000 persons appeared
imminent. It said hundreds of
young Russians arrived at the wa-
terfront in army trucks, and that
crowds milled around the dock
where the 13,286-ton Admiral Na-
jimov was moored.
Officially, the White House and
Pentagon remained mum. State
Department Press Officer Lincoln
White would tell newsmen only
that the department would have
nothing to say over the weekend.
He declined to answer "one way or
the other" as to whether the Unit-
ed States was satisfied with the
rate of the Soviet pullout.
Privately, some authorities said
there appeared to be no big rusha
by the Russians to get out of,
Cuba the several thousand military3
personnel they promised to re-
move by mid-March.
According to information made
available so far, an estimated 17,-1
000 Russian military personnel
were in Cuba a month ago before
Moscow indicated to the United
States its further withdrawall
plans.

WASHINGTON (M)-The United
States said yesterday Communists
have succeeded in infiltrating the
government of Brazil.
It did not elaborate.
The potentially explosive public
assertion came in the midst of
important Brazilian negotiations
with the United States government
for extensive financial assistance.
Deliberate Move
Whether the statement was cal-
culated as a deliberate move in
efforts by Washington to get Bra-
zil to take a more decisive stand
on Communist issues was not
clear. There was considerable con-
fusion in the way the state de-
partment handled it.
But there was no doubt that it
reflected a deep concern in high
official quarters over the policies
of Brazilian President Joao Gou-
lart. Brazil in the past has been
one of the countries in this hemis-
phere most reluctant to take any
strong actions against the Com-
munist regime of Prime Minister
Fidel Castro in Cuba.
The allegation of Communist in-
Guild To Vote
on Settlement
NEW YORK (IP)-Guild leaders
decided by a one-vote margin yes-
terday to recommend to their
members a publishers' plan for
ending New York's 98-day news-
paper blackout.
Individual AFL-CIO New York
Newspaper Guild units will vote
Sunday and Monday on terms of
the proposed pact. Guild approval
of the terms is needed before 3000
striking printers will return to
work on eight closed dailies. The
printers vote Sunday on a separ-
ate settlement plan.

filtration of the Brazilian govern-
ment - originally attributed to
United States Ambassador Lin-
coln Gordon - attracted wide-
spread attention in Brazil.
No Comment
A spokesman for the Brazilian
embassy said there would be no
comment. Nor was there any from
that country's finance minister,
San Tiago Dantas, currently in
Washington seeking extensive
United States aid, including the
'Asks Action
Congress
WASHINGTON (M)-The chair-
man of a House anti-trust subcom-
mittee said yesterday if illegal
practices are behind increases in
newsprint prices, Congress should
do something about it.
Rep. Emanuel Celler (D-NY)
said he is surprised the American
Newspaper Publishers Association
hasn't tried.
Celler's subcommittee is looking
into the concentration of owner-
ship in the United States news-
paper business.
The New York congressman said
subcommittee investigators found
the high price of newsprint often
is cited as a reason for the collapse
of some newspapers.
"Now if this rising cost is due
to illegal means, I think we should
remove those illegal means if we
can," Celler said.
Celler said a Canadian news-
print cartel "places the business of
newspapers in a bind."
Celler asked Stanford Smith,
general manager of the Publishers
Association, whether newsprint
prices declined after New York
newspapers ceased publication be-
cause of the strike there.
SSmith saidthe -price remained
steady, at $135 a ton. He said the
price was $59 a ton 20 years ago,
and rose steadily until it reached
the $135 level in 1957.
"So that regardless of supply and
demand the price if fixed in Cana-
da by a group of willful men, I
might say," Celler said.
He said the subcommittee tried
to investigate newsprint prices in
1950, but was balked when some
United States companies rushed
their records across the Canadian
border, and the Ontario legislature
passed a law making it illegal for
anyone to give a legislative tri-
bunal any information about
newsprint.

BRAZILIAN GOVERNMENT:
U.S. Charges Communist Infiltration

PAGE THREE

release of some $84 million in aid
which was withheld following the
abrupt resignation of President
Janio Quadros in 1961.
One of the state department's
purposes in taking a public stand
obviously is an effort to get Gor-
don out of a potentially embarras-
sing situation in his relations with
the Brazilian government.
State Department press officer
Lincoln White told newsmen yes-
terday that the statement had
been given to the subcommittee
"on the responsibility of the de-
partment, and it is improper to at-
tribute any part of the text to
Ambassador Gordon."
The statement was issued Thurs-
day, over Ambassador Gordon's
name, in a printed report issued
by a House Foreign Affairs Sub-~
committeeon Inter-American Af-
fairs.

THE PROPOSED MICHIGAN
CONSTITUTION
an impartial discussion
by 4 U. of M. Professors
Questions from the floor ore encouraged
March 17, at 7:00 P.M.
WESLEY LOUNGE... 120 S. State
DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL
Concert Tonight
DAVE BRUBECKy
Hill Auditorium . . . 8:30 P.M.
(ALL SEATS SOLD OUT)
Limited standing room only available

THE MICHIGAN UNION
' CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

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RECI
SON'
CON
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presents on Saturday
March 16
ITAL:French Horn Recital-David Rogers
Lane Hall . .. 8:30 p.m.
G: Letitia Garner-Sporano
Lane Hall . .. 8:30 p.m.
CERT: Development Council Concert-
Dave Brubeck
Hill Auditorium . .. 8:30 p.m.
TOGRAPHY DISPLAY: Union Lobby.. .

Adams Term-s Election
tCritical for'Democrats
By GERALD STORCH
Visiting Ann Arbor yesterday in his campaign for another term
on the state Supreme Court, Paul L. Adams believes this is a now-
or-never year for the Democrats, as far as the judgeships are
concerned.

,il i
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All Day
ART SHOW: Union North Lounge...
1-5, 8:30-11:30 p.m.

Tomorrow
March 17:

Ann Arbor Piano Students' Recital
Organ Recital by University Organist--Robert Noehren
Sheila Bates-Soprano: In Honor of,Zonta International
Jewish Life Through the Arts Series
Harold Clurman: "Scope of the Theater"
Art Show

If he and Eugene Black are elected, the
on the high court would switch to 5-3 from the

liberal representation
present 4-4 stalemate.

If not, the Democrats would have*
to wait until 1967 to have even
a chance at attaining a majority,
for the two seats up for grabs in
1965 are now held by Democrats.
Adams declined to endorse or
criticize the judiciary section in
the proposed State Constitution,
explaining that in the future he
might have to disqualify himself
if a case came up involving some-
thing he'd commented on before.
Similarly, if elected, Adamsv
could not take part in any su-
preme court action on reappor-
tioning Michigan, for as attorney
general he had to defend the
State of . Michigan when the
Scholle vs. Hare case arose.
Adams, also formerly a Regent,
praised University President Har-
lan Hatcher's statement of the
University's support for a fair
housing ordinance. In issues pos-
sessing a demonstrably "vital con-
cern for the University," it is
"highly desirable" that official
stands be taken, Adams remarked.'
He resigned from the Regents in
1957 to become attorney general,
then was temporarily appointed
supreme court justice in 1962. De-
feated for re-election by 45,000
votes last fall, Adams said he is!
"campaigning harder in Wayne
County" this time in an effort to
make up the deficit.

Featured Speaker NORMAN MAILER
Tickets. . . Union Desk-$1.50--$1.25

.March 25

..

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PAUL ADAMS
... Supreme Court

Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
The Guadalajara Summer School,
a fully accredited University of
Arizona program, conducted in co-
operation with professors from
Stonford University, University of
California, and Guadalajara, will
offer July 1 to August 11, art,
folklore, geography, history, lan-
guage and literature courses. Tui-
tion, board and room is $240.
Write Prof. Juan B. Rael, P.O. Box
7227, Stanford, Calif.

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
SUNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and Serm

'!' r

SAB BATHF

I

I I

non

for Students.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer and commentary.

1)

TUESDAY-
9:15 A.M. Holy
WEDNESDAY-
7:00 A.M. Holy
FRIDAY-
12:10 P.M. Holy

Communion.
Communion.
Communion.

VENICE-Workmen discovered Bil or tadum
a 13-century Byzantine fresco in
the Basilica of St. Mark Wednes-
day behind a marble facing in the
baptistry. Experts here called it a
major discovery, as the art work By The Associated Press
elsewhere in the basilica is of mo- LANSING-A bill to help fi-
saic. nance a proposed 100,000 seat
Olympic stadium from racing re-
NEW YORK-Dull trading con- ceipts was on its way to Gov.
tinued on the Stock Market yes- George Romney yesterday. A con-
terday. The= Dow-Jones 30 indus- ference committee sought to iron-
trials went up 2.60, the 20 rail- out House-Senate differences on
roads up .13, the 15 utilities up .10 another measure providing for
and the 65 stocks up .60. construction of the stadium.

-t TOMORROW at 8
A. RAYMOND KATZ
Leader in Modern Religious Art
gives an illustrated lecture on
"A NEW APPROACH TO HEBRAIC SYMBOLISM"
Presented by B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation .
and Beth Israel Center
in conjunction with the C.A.F.
All Are Welcome 1429 Hill Street

THE CHURCH

OF CHRIST

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church--Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenow Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11 :15: Worship Ser-
vices, Sermon by the pastor, "Accounting
for Our Hope in Christ."
Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:15: 1ible Classes.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, ,Lutheran Stu-
dent Organization, Supper and Program.
Talk by Pastor Scheips on "Predestination
and Human Responsibility."
Tuesday at 6:00: Married Students' Potluck
Supper. Phone 663-5560 for reservations.
Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. and at 10:00 p.m.:
Lenten Vespers, with sermon by the Rev.
W. J. Hassold, "A Lamb Goes Uncomplain-
ing Forth."
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Class, "What the Christian
Hopes For in Society."
11:00 a.m. Morning Worship.
6:45 p.m. American Baptist Student Fellow-
ship, Worship and Discussion. "American.
Protestantism."
MONDAY
12:00 noon-Lunch and Discussion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.

I . I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8.6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. M: Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m. - Morning Worship.
"Toward Understanding God. God l Holy
Spirit," sermon by Dr. Rupert.
This service is broadcast over WOIA (1290
AM, 102.9 FM, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m.).
10:15 a.m.---Seminar, "Christianisty and Cor-
munism," "The Church in Communist
Countries." Pine Room.
5:30 p.m.-Student Cabinet, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-On the new Stte Constitution,
Social Hail. Open to the public.
MONDAY
8:00 to 11:00 p.m. - Open House, Jean
Robe's apartment.
TUESDAY
7:00 p.m.-Two classes: "Christian Courtship
and Marriage," and "The Church in Theo-
logy, Sociology and Prophecy."
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion in Chapel fol-
lowed by breakfast in the Pine Room.
4:00 p.m.-Student Fellowship Coffee Hour,
Wesley, Lounge.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Grad Supper. Program on Freud-
ian Psychology.
THURSDAY
7:00 p.m.-Kappa Phi pledge meeting, Youth
Room followed by Cabinet meeting in the
Green Room.

John G. Malcin, Minister
W. Stadium at Edgewood
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m. Bible School
11:00 a.m. Regular Worship
6:30 p.m. Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Bible Study
For transportation to any service call 2-2756
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenow Avenue
NO 2-4466-
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and 11:50.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patricia Pickett
Stoneburner.
NO 2-3580

DR. PHILIP DUEY
2nd Annual IFC-Vulcans Master of Ceremonies

11:00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years
age.)

of

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-"When Ypu
Become Disillusioned," Dr. Fred E. Luchs.
Bible Lecture by Mrs. Luchs, 10:20-10:40.
CHURCH SCHOOL: crib-9th grade, 9:30 and
11 :00 a.m.
STUDENT GUILD, 802 Monroe, telephone 2.
5189.
WHRV, 1600, broadcasts the Sunday service
at 11:00.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppon Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister

SOUNDS from the

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Donald Postema, Minister
Woshtenow at Forest
Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan
10:00 A.M. Worship Services

11:00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
A free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Reading Room hours are Mon-
day thru Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m.
except Sundays and Holidays. Monday
evening 7:00 to 9:00.

aE'

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WAM IL *1 402

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1 52 "PR - Wk A L 9 -- . .- - - . -

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