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March 16, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MARCH 16, 1963

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Vilson Views Aspects of Ancient Egyptian Culture

Gold Completes Book on Delinquents

tes High Interest in Egyptology
spite Lack of Relevance to Today

Explains Religion as 'Central Aspect
Of Way of Life' of Nile Kingdoms

By STEVEN HALLER
"Although ancient Egypt is
hardly of specific importance
among the events of today's times,
there still remains an extraordin-
ary curiosity about it," Prof. John
A. Wilson of the University of
Chicago said recently.
Speaking on "The Study of
Egyptology in the United States,"
Prof. Wilson said the traditions
of interest in the study of Egyp-
tian antiquities has in this coun-
try been "intermittent and pat-
Prician."
The first American -interested.
in ancient4Egypt was a New Eng-
land seaman named John Led-
yard, Prof. Wilson said. In 1788,
Ledyard' was commissioned by
Thomas Jefferson to find out
about Egypt. He found the coun-
try not to his liking and gave up,
after writing to Jefferson, "If you
could be here, you'd lose all your
interest in Egypt."
Rosetta Stone
A group of French scholars
under Napoleon founded a re-
search institute in Egypt and re-
corded many details there. But
their greatest claim to fame came
with their discovery of the Ros-
Panhel Installs
New Pres dent
Patricia Elkins, '64, was in-
stalled as Panhellenic Association
president by the retiring president,
Ann McMillan, '63, at the Panhel
Presidents Council weekly meet-
ing yesterday.
Miss Elkins presented Miss Mc-
Millan with a gavel engraved with
her name and the dates of her
term of office. Each of the new
executive board members was
then installed by Miss Elkins.
Plans for the coming year were
then announced by the various
presidents. Many stated that a
broader cultural program was
their objective this year.,

etta Stone. Three languages were
inscribed on this stone: Greek
and Egyptian in two scripts, De-
motic and Hieroglyphic. The lat-
ter two were deciphered by refer-
ence to the known Greek, greatly
aiding future study.
Up until that time, Prof. Wil-
son explained, hieroglyphics had
been considered "highly esoteric,"
and as something only the self-
appointed "mystic" of the day
dared to explain.
Now that Napoleon had laid
Egypt open to the Western world,
researchers and individuals of
lesser repute flooded in from the
four corners of the globe, Prof.
Wilson said. Forgeries and plund-
ering of monuments, not to men-
tion the resulting d&mage to these
edifices, blackened the name of
Egyptology as a science for some
time.
Gripes of Wrath
Not for many years did a-)y in-
dividuals protest against this
problem. In the 1840's, George
Glidden gave several lectures on
the subject. In the course of heap-
ing his wrath against what was
going on in Egypt, hetaroused in
many people an, interest in the
field., Prof. Wilson added that it
was probably these lectures, which
caused Egyptology to become a
familiar word in America.
Probably the greatest of all
American Egyptologists w e r e
James H. Breasted of the Univer-
sity of Chicago and George A.
Reisner of Harvard, Prof. Wilson
said, adding that Breasted wrote
"the best history of Egypt."
Among Reisner's many accom-
plishments were the establishment
of the order of the kings in the
Sudan and of architectural pro-
cess in and around Egypt. Under
his auspices, careful reconstruc-
tions of Egyptian tombs were put
together and are now on display
in the Cairo Museum and else-
where.
When Howard Carter discover-
ed King Tutankhamen's tomb in
1922, a legal hassle arose over the

"Whereas religion is with our
civilization a number of secular
emotions, to the ancient Egyptians
it was the central aspect of their
way of life," Prof. John A. Wilson
of the University of Chicago said
recently.
There are many "faces" to
Egyptian religion which, to some
analysts, are all functional aspects
of the same monotheism. How-
ever, Prof. Wilson said that he
preferred to think of Egypt as
having had a polytheistic form of
religion.
Ancient Egypt was a composite
of North and South Egypt, in re-
ligion as well as politically, Prof.
Wilson said. He explained that the
Northern Egyptian deities were
similar to those of Asia, while the
Southern Egyptian deities were
like those of Africa.
There were three general types
of deities in ancient Egypt, Prof.
Wilson said. Of these, the first
type was the cosmic deity; the

JOHN WILSON,
. .. ancient Egypt

division of the artifacts in the
monument. But in recent years
there has been a marked reversal
of Egyptian sentiment concrening
investigations there, due in a
great part to the building of the
Aswan Dam, which threatens to
submerge priceless monuments.
Egyptology still has a rather
small following in the United
States, with only eight institutions
teaching it and others (the Uni-
versity included) carrying on
work in Egypt.
"The standards orfEgyptology
have been announced and set.
Due largely to the efforts of men
such as Breasted and Reisner, the
plunderer and the mystic no
longer have any place among the
ranks of professional Egyptolo-
gists," Prof. Wilson concluded.
Dance To Honor
Military Officers
The 39th annual Gold Bars and
Braid Militai'y Ball, "A Night on
the World," recognizing t h e
global service of today's military
officer, wlil be held tonight at the
Michigan League. The University
Jazz Band will present dance
music in the Ballroom, while the
"All-Nighters" will provide twist
music in the Vandenburg Rm.

sun, the moon, the
and West were all as
Egyptians.-

stars, East
gods to the

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Local Boys
Each region or city of Egypt
had its own god as well, particu-
larly in the southern part of the
country.
The third type of deity was the
protective spirit; under this name
were grouped justice, childbirth,
fate, and many other such anth-
ropomorphic gods. The physician
was a priest of the goddess of
healing and attempted to cure
illnesses through offerings and
rituals.
If a person from one region
found that another name was in
use elsewhere for the same god,
he tended to consider it as merely
an interesting circumstance. :
Sacred animals were often
picked out to be the places of
function of a certain god, as the
bull was with the god Apis.
No Restriction
But the Egyptians did not wor-
ship animals in a totemistic sense,
Prof. Wils on said. He added that
if a group of Egyptians happened
to favor a deity of the form of a
bull, this did not keep them from
eating beef.
In one sense, the society of.
Egypt was not secular, Prof. Wil-
son said. Everything from floods
to sickness was attributed to the
activities of the gods. Thus the
Egyptian tended to have a "myth-
opic" mind; that is, he used the
mythology of religion to account
for things, rather than attempt-
ing to think out a cause-and-ef-
fect relationship.
Prof. Wilson added that any-
thing was potentially religious,
even Man himself. Heroes were
often recognized after death as
having been divine during their
lifetimes.
Immortal
.The king of Egypt was "The
God," the "Distant One," whose
very existence on earth was am-
ple justification for the existence
of the state. Since "a god must
not die," upon the death of the
king a new one was quickly put

in his place, and the people were
expected to believe that this was1
the same god reincarnated in at
new form, Prof. Wilson said.
Under Egyptian religion, the
state was a theocracy. Other peo-
ple served the king as servants;
or priests. However, according to
the dogma of the state, the pea-j
sants were only "using" the land3
through the graciousness of the1
king, although they still passed3
the use of such land down from
one generation to the next, Prof.f
Wilson noted.
Personal religion was not an-
cestor-worship, although a family
might appeal to the spirit of a
departed ancestor to help them
solve some problem.
God was referred to in the sin-
gular in personal religion, andI
there is much controversy overI
what such usage means in refer-+
ence to human behavior and the+
leading of "the good life," Prof.1
Wilson said.+
Mortuary Religion'
Another aspect of Egyptian re-
ligion was that of mortuary re-
ligion, Prof. Wilson' went on.
Whereas personal religion was pri-
marily oral, mortuary religion was
to a great extent written; great
walls covered with such inscrip-
tions have been found.
Prof. Wilson questioned whether'
the great amount of time and'
space devoted by the Egyptians to
the hereafter was "morbid.'
"Surely no people can face
death with full confidence, but
the Egyptian attitude was prob-
ably more one of love of life than
of terror of death," he noted.
"The tombs and their contents
contain ample proof of the asser-
tion of vigor and gaiety which
obtained among the Egyptians.
They assumed that the next world
would contain the best aspects of
the one in which they then lived."
Heretic Pharaoh
The major breakthrough in
Egyptian religion occurred with
the ascension to the throne of
Akhenaton, the "Heretical Ph'ar-
aoh," in 1375 B.C. This monarch
instituted reforms not only in
language and art but in religion
as well, doing away with the con-
fusing multiplicity of deities of
the time and calling !nstead for
worship of the life-giving power
of Ra, the sun.
"This was not the first mono-'
theism, as many scholars assert,
since only two persons-the king
and his wife-actually worship-
ped the sun. The other people
worshipped the king," Prof. Wil-
son explained.
Clurm AnTo 'Talk
On Theatre Scope
Harold Clurman, director of
"Awake and Sing," "Golden Boy,"
"Tiger at the Gates" and "Bus
Stop," will discuss "The Scope of
the Theater" at 3 p.m. tomorrow
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Clurman's talk will conclude the
Professional Theatre Program's
Distinguished Lecture Series,

By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM
Prof. Martin Gold of the psy-
chology department and the In-
stitute for Social Research, has
completed a monograph called
"Status Forces, in Delinquent
Boys," to be published sometime
this spring.
The book focuses on the link-
age between juvenile delinquency
and the lower-class occupational
status of the delinquents' parents,
During his seven months of
field research in various-level
Flint communities, it became clear
that "lower status youngsters are
more likely to become delinquent.
In every type of delinquency data
examined so far-based on insti-
tutionalized delinquents, court
cases, arrests or police contacts-
lower status boys were over-rep-
resented," Prof. Gold asserts.
Sociological Factors
To develop a comprehensive
theory on the correlation of status
and delinquency, Prof. Gold ex-
amines the relation between "so-
ciological factors," such as neigh-
borhoods or schools, and the psy-
chological problems of the delin-
quent boys.
The major correlation is that
those factors which "are more im-
portant in determining delinquent
behavior occur more often in the
lives of lower status boys," the
book states.
Conditions of lower status, by
being 1ss attractive to children
than higher-class conditions, also
exert less control and "strengthen
the provocation to delinquency,"
Prof. Gold explains.,
School Performance
The report also notes more spe-
cific correlations between status
and psychological attitudes. In
the case of a lower class student's
poor performance at school,' the
failure generates a feeling of per-
Hager, Loomis
Take Petitions
For ARC Post
Charlene Hager, '65, Assembly
Association Housing Chairman,
and Maxine Loomis, '65N, presi-
dent of Mary. Markley Hall, have
petitioned for the "office of As-
sembly president.
Members of Assembly House
Council will elect the new presi-
dent and the executive vice-presi-
dent at their weekly meeting
Monday. Although no one has pe-
titioned for vice-president, both
Miss Hager and Miss Loomis nave
indicated-a willingness to run for
the office if not elected president
Petitioning for either office closes
today.
Petitioning for the other Ex-
ecutive Board positions is open
until March 26. These positions
include secretary, treasurer, and
several committee chairmanships.

sonal inadequacy. Lower class+
students feel that failure at school+
presages failure in the later occu-;
pational world.,
Another direct link, the book'
states, is the way boys are dis-
ciplined. Prof. Gold writes that
"physical punishments are more,
prevalent among parents in lower
social strata and among parents
of delinquent boys." Such meth-
ods induce aggression much more
than does the quieter, "guilt-in-
ducing reasoning," he explains.
The p h y s i c a l punishment
method initiates delinquency be-
cause although lower-class boys
are more easily provoked to de-
linquency, the social controls
against delinquency-family and
community ties - s e e m weaker
than for higher-class boys.
To bring clear the status-delin-
quency correlation, Prof. Gold
forms sets of hypotheses which he
substantiates in his research.
These hypothese center around
the sociological factors - family
and community-which might af-
fect the delinquent and the psy-
chological factors which then re-
sult to provoke him, such as the
anticipation of personal failure.
Poorer Facilities
The sociological significance of
the community is in the fact that
lower-status boys have poorer liv-
ing standards and thus are less
pleased with their community. In
a questionnaire administered to
delinquent and non-delinquent
boys, the delinquent tended to de-
scribe his neighborhood as "more
bad than good." The non-delin-
quent called it "a very good
place."
Prof. Gold writes that the so-
ciological significance of the fam-
ily is that the father's status at
his job relates proportionally to
the influence he wields at home.
The son is thus often attracted
to the father according to his
occupational status. The delin-
*r
COLLEGE COLLEGE
+0 +NG
A Job Your Career
SPECIAL 8-MONTH COURSE
FOR COLLEGE WOMEN
.For proof of answer (and further
Information) write College Dean for
GIBBS GIRLS AT WORK.
KATHARINE GIBBS
SECRETARIAL 1
BOSTON 16, MASS,. 21 Marlberoggb Street
N1W YORK 17. N.Y.... 200 Park Amue
MONTCLAIR,N.J.. . 33 Plymouth Street
PROVIDENCE 6, R.I. . . 155 AngelStreet

quents often responded to the
question "What do you do with
your father?" by saying, "I don't
do nothing with him." The non-
delinquents typical response was,
"Oh, we do a lot together."
A psychological result of lower
class status is "an anticipation of
personal failure," Prof. Gold con-
tinues. While lower-status boys
subscribe equally to the American
dream of equal opportunity, this
anticipation of failure which they
hold "creates problems of status
deprivation which delinquency is
especially suited to solve."
In responding to questions about
the future, the delinquents tend-
ed to respond: "I'd like a job in'
a grocery store." The non-delin-
quent said something on the order
of "I'd like to go into law or medi-
cine."
Wilson Announces
IST Appointment
Frederick B. Llewellyn has been
appointed deputy and science ad-
visor to the director of the In-
stitute of Science and Technology,
IST director James T. Wilson an-
nounced yesterday.
DIAL 8-6416
TWO LAUGH HITS
The howlingest, blushingest
lesson in physical education!
-AND-
Filed with tie
-O LAUGHTERI!
Bo-il.r

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,
xr::::.s; "gti r Y4::sA .i': 'r s°% s"?s MM".. 4:ffl.W ."v. ". i""sssy.";.. . . .,.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building'
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
SATURDAY, MARCH 16
Da Calendara
4:15 p.m.-School of Music Degree Re-
cital-David Rogers, French horn: Lane
Hall Aud.
7:30/ p.m.--Swimming Championship
Finals-Mich. Class "B" High Schools:
Varsity. Pool.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Degree Re-
cital-Letitia Garner, Soprano: Lane
Hall Aud.
General Notices
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be with-
held until the approval has become ef-
fective.

Women's League, Frosh Weekend,
March 22, 8:00-12:00, League Ballroom.
Dental Class of 1964, Odonto Ball,
March 30, 9:30-1:00, Union Ballroom.
International Students Assoc., Monte
Carlo Ball, March 30, 9:00-1:00, League
Ballroom.
Seventh-Day Adventist Student As-
soc., Lecture, March 23, 3:00 p.m.,. 528D
SAB.
Young Democrats Club, "Trends '63,"
March 23, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., Mich.
Union.
Voice, Forum, "Churches and Social
Activities," /March 19, 8:00 p.m., Multi-
purpose Room.
Michigan Christian Fellowship, Mis-
sions Conferette, March 15 & 16, 7:30
p.m. & all day Sat., Mich. Union.
Undergrad Women Students now on
campus who do not havea housing
commitment for the summer session,
1963, may apply for housing in Resi-
dence Halls at the Office of Student Af-
fairs, Housing Division, 3011 SAB, be-
ginning Mon., March 18.
Detroit Armenian Women's Club
Scholahship: Undergrad Armenian stu-
dents who have completed at least one
year of college work, who are residents
of Mich., who lave demonstrated schol-
astic ability, and who are of good char-
acter may apply for these scholarships.
Applications are available at the Schol-

arship Office, 2011 Student Activitiesi
Bldg. and should be returned to that]
office by April 8.
Placement j
POSITION OPENINGS:9
United Air Lines, Chicago, Ill.-Open-
ing in Law Department for a Labor
Attorney. Dept. is located at the Exec.
Offices in suburban Chicago. Age 30-35t
with 3 to 5 yrs. exper. in arbitration,
advising on labor litigation& contract
negotiations.
Pittsburgh Coke & Chemical Co.,
Pittsburgh, Pa.-Ass't. to Sales Man-
ager. Degree-any curriculum. 1 to 3
yrs. in pipeline sales pref.; coatings
sales exper. acceptable. Immed. opening.+
City of Elkhart, Ind.-The Housing
Authority of the City is seeking a full
time Executive Director to administer
its proposed 300 unit low-rent housing
development. Recent or June grad
with background in Sociology as well as
Public Admin.
Management Consultants in the East
-1) Process Engnr.-ME or equiv. with
minimum of 5 yrs. exper. in a high
volume type of industry, Must have
exper. In machine stamping. Exper. in
welding, assembly, finishing & fasten-
ing desirable. 2) Project Engnr.-Spe-
cial Equipmnt--ME or equiv. with bkgd.
in the design of special purpose ma-
chinery. Exper. & knowledge in mech-
anized assembly equipment. At least
10 yrs. exper. in a volume type of in-
dustry.
Oregon Civil Service-Parks Manage-
ment Ass't. Degree with major in Parks
Admin., Landscape Arch. or Forestry.
Applications accepted from June grads.
Oregon residence waived.
U.S. Navy, Bureau of Naval Weapons
-Employment oppor. throughout U.S.
& overseas. Openings include: Engnrs.
(all types); Chemists; Physicists; Librar-
ians; Mathematicians; Operations Res.
Analysts; Illustrator; Supervisory Fi-
nancial Manager; Personnel Officer; Po-
sition Classification Specialist; etc.
Mich. Civil Service-1) Social Worker
AI-Completion of 2 yrs. study at Univ.
with courses in social sciences. 2) Child
Welfare Worker.AI-Degree with not
less than 30 hrs. in social or related
sciences. Open to June grads.
Management Consultants in Mass.
Client firms have various openings in-
cluding: Controller; Mathematician; Ad-
min. Ass't.; Business Dev. Manager;
Electronic Engnr.; R & D Engnr.; Sys-
tems Analyst Jr.; Sales Manager; Ma-
(Continued on Page 5)

1

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The University of Michigan Newman Club
Presents the
CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE SERIES

s .c.

CINEMA GUILD prejent4

3

Dial 2-6264
S3N ow
iiw~ .

FEATURES AT
1:00 - 3:00- :00
7:00 and 9:20

NOWI..ADD A MOTION PICTURE TO THE WONDERS OF THE WORLD!1
v- r ~fii
)w I
inthe HAROLD HECHTprodriom
X0- - Asio EASTMANCOLOR JUr,

Tonight and Tomorrow at 7:00 and 9:00
INGMAR BERGMAN'S
'The DEVIL'S WANTON'
By the master of the intellectual camera
starring
DORIS SVEVLUND - BIRGER MALMSTEN
PLUS: "LISTEN, LESTER"
A rollicking farce of the 1920's
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 Cents

Sunday, March 17, 7:30 p.m.

"Physical Aspects of Marriage"
PREGNANCY and CHILDBIRTH
MEDICAL PROBLEMS
DR. JOHN O'SULLIVAN
DR. GENA ROSE PAHUCKI

.IIGA

DIAL 5-6290
HELD OVER!
(Ends Monday)

I

+r

Wednesday, March 20, 8:00 p.m.
"PSYCHOLOGICAL ADJUSTMENTS IN MARRIAGE"

COLUMBIA PICTURES presens A MERRY BRESIER PRODUCTIOII
CHARLTON WTTE
HESilTNMi lEuxy
GEORGE FRANCE JAMES
CHAKIRNisYENDARREN
&I Met CHEN'

THE PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM

i
AA

of
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
presents}
THE THIRD
in its
Distinguished
Lecture Series

Feminine-Masculine Differences
Role of Husband and Wife
Financial Problems
Mr. Peter Dwyder, M.S.W.--
Catholic Social Services

Sunday, March 24, 7:30 p.m.
"THE CHRISTIAN HOME"

I

|I

HAROLD CLURMAN

I

Parent-Child Relationship
Prayer, education, and religious instruction
in the home
Work and recreation in the home
Mr. and Mrs. Leo F. McNamara

I

i

One of Broadway's most important directors,
who has staged such notable artistic successes as:

I . R ff "' ,.,,: r IEMMMM '3= EIA UT,

11

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