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March 07, 1963 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-07

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MARCH 7,1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE DERU1W

Kennedy Blasts Cuban
Troop Removal Rate,
Lack of Arms Reports

NA TO Head ACT TO EXPIRE:
Likes Plan White Calls Draft 'Unequitable'

I, U

SNEAK TESTS:
U.S. Demands Checks
In Atomic Bant Treaty
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John F. Kennedy pledged yesterday
that his administration will not sign an atomic test-ban treaty unless
it contains "every assurance" of detecting any sneak series of explo-
sions by the Soviets.
In Geneva yesterday, the Soviet Union brushed aside a new
United States demanded for negotiations on inspection procedures in a
treaty banning nuclear weapons tests. United States Delegate Charles
C. Stelle called the Russian refus-
al stonewall tactics. He told the
I * j17-nation disarmament conference
the West is puzzled over how to
proceed in quest of a treaty.

JOHN F. KENNEDY
.. inspection required
!BITTERNESS:
French .Act
To Conclude,
Coal Strike
By The Associated Press
PARIS-The French government
last night threatened new tough
measures to end the six-day strike
of 200,000 coal miners.
The imposition of coal and gas
rationing loomed.
The announcement came after a
meeting of French President
Charles de Gaulle and his cabinet.
It brought a reaction of bitterness
froth union leaders in northern
France, where half the coal is min-
0d. They said they are preparing
for a long strike.
Union leaders told a mass meet-
ing of several thousand miners at
Merlebach in Lorraine they would
negotiate, but not if the govern-
ment insisted on its back-to-work
condition.
The government did not specify
the action it would take.

Define Inspection N
Stelle said the Soviet offer of
three on-site inspections a year is
meaningless as long as the Rus-
sians refuse to explain what they
mean by an inspection.
Soviet Ambassador Semyon K.
Tsarapkin said the United States is
blocking an agreement because it
wants to continue improving its
nuclear weapons.
In Washington critics have been
contending that United States test
ban negotiators at Geneva are of-
fering too many concessions to the
Soviets-even though the Reds
have shown no willingness to ac-
cept reduced United States de-
mands.
Affect of Tests
Kennedy was asked specifically
about a weekend statement by
Deputy Disarmament Director Ad-
rian F. Fisher. Fisher said the
executive branch of the govern-
ment has concluded that further
underground tests would not alter
the United States-Soviet strategic
military ainnce.
Kennedy was asked why, under
this assessment, the United States
could not accept the Soviet offer
of up to three on-site inspections
annually to police a test ban. Unit-
ed States negotiators have said
there ought to be seven on-the-
spot checks a year.
Kennedy said the administra -
tion "'would not accept a test ban
which would permit indefinite un-
derground testing by the Soviet
Union."
Other Problems
Saying that the number of on-
site inspections is only one part
of the tes- ban policing question,
Kennedy sair. the United States
would also have to have an under-
standing with the Soviets on what
area could be looked at in the in-
spections and under what condi-
tions the inspectors could move in
and out.

Fi t ch ClIaim sI
Some Arms'
Stay in Cuba
Believes Russians1
Removed Missiles
WASHINGTON W) - President
John F. Kennedy said yesterday he,
is not satisfied with the rate at
which Soviet troops are leaving
Cuba.
At the same time, he said he hasE
no accurate information on the
real extent of the withdrawal.-
The question of Soviet perform-7
ance in carrying out a pledge to
withdraw several thousand troops
from Cuba by mid-March came in
three parts: Does the administra-
tion have accurate information on
the number already removed? Is;
Kennedy satisfied with the rate of
withdrawal? Does the United
States have any arrangement with;
the Soviets to verify the promised,
pullout?
Kennedy replied, without elab-
oration, "No, the answer to your
question would really be no to all
of them."
Ground Forces
A few hours after Kennedy's
news conference the Army's top
intelligence officer, Maj. Alva R.
Fitch, told investigating senators
"there are no indications that So-
viet ground force units have de-
parted from Cuba other than those
associated with" the intermediate
-and medium-range missile sys-
tems.
Fitch testified at a closed ses-
sion of the Senate Armed Services
Subcommittee on Preparedness.
Fitch said, "It is our belief that
the Soviets did, in fact, remove all
strategic weapons systems that
were in Cuba when the quaran-
tine was imposed ... No nuclear
warheads are believed to be in
Cuba although it is possible that
they could be used by some of the
weapons systems present there ...
Storage Caves
"There are several thousand
caves in Cuba and many have
been used for storage over the
years."
Fitch said considerable activity
has been detected around these
caves, and that they might be em-.
ployed for storage of ammunition,
supplies, vehicles and even air-
craft."
Kennedy said at another point
the administration believes "the
wisest policy is the isolation of
Communism in this hemisphere"
by trying to confine it to Cuba. As
an example,he said the United
States hopes other hemisphere
countries will control the move-
ment of their citizens to and from
Cuba-because these people could
be potential saboteurs or revolu-
tionaries.
'Isolation' Policy
While emphasizing the "isola-
tion" policy, Kennedy drew away
from a suggestion that Cuba's
Communist government be under-
mined by more forceful action
aimed at cutting off its access to
vital oil imports.
Kennedy said this would require
a naval blockade which he de-
scribed as an act of war.

For Arms
WASHINGTON (P) - Dirk U.
Stikker, secretary general of the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion, firmly endorsed yesterday the
Kennedy administration's proposal
that NATO be provided a nuclear
force.
"I am personally very much in
favor of it," the Dutch diplomat
told reporters after a one-hour
conference with President John F.!
Kennedy.
Stikker said he discussed with
Kennedy the problems Europe is
facing since France vetoed Brit-
ain's entry into the Common Mar-
ket, and also the Nassau Pact be-;
tween Kennedy and British Prime
Hinister Harold Macmillan which
first proposed a fleet equipped
with nuclear arms and with crews
from many nations.
Stikker said there is "a great
deal of interest" in the European
NATO capitals in Kennedy's sug-
gestion for a multi-lateral nuclear
force. The idea, he said, was "rath-
er favorably received" in Europe.
In response to a question, Stik-
ker said that he agrees with the
President, who said at a news
conference yesterday morning that
tension in Europe has declined
considerably compared with the
situation two years ago.
the main reason for this les-
sening of tension, Stikker said, is
"That the whole alliance agreed
on essential points on which we
are willing to risk the greatest
dangers."
Accordingly, he said, the Euro-
peans began to build up their
conventional forces and accepted
heavier taxation. Russian re-
straint, pe added, "is due to this
active, positive stand."
Subcommittee
Acts To Pass
Youth' Job .Act
WASHINGTON (A')-- President
John F. Kennedy's proposed Youth
Employment. Act cleared its first
hurdle in the House yesterday.
A House education subcommit-
tee approved it by a party-line
vote with Democrats in the ma-
jority. It now goes to the full
House Education and Labor Com-
mittee.
The bill would create a 15,000-
member conservation corps for
youths between 16 and 22 and a
home town youth corps for both
young men and women in the same
age bracket.
The President at his news con-
ference yesterday urged prompt
enactment of the bill to help ease
the unemployment problem of
young people who have dropped
out of school and can't find jobs.

Abandon Plan
To Eliminate
Reserve Corps
WASHINGTON (P)-The Penta-
gon, in the face of opposition in
Congress, abandoned yesterday its
plan to abolish the high school
Reserve Officers Training Corps
and indicated instead proposals to
expand it are acceptable.
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara had sought approval
from Congress to end support of
the program peffective July 1,
transferring ROTC units to the
National Defense Cadet Corps.
Assistant Secretary Norman S.
Paul told a House armed services
subcommittee of the shift in po-
sitionaf ter a hint that a fight
over junior ROTC could spell
trouble for the proposed overhaul
of the college ROTC.
Subcommittee Chairman F. Ed-
ward Herbert (D-La), who had
opposed the cutback since it was
first suggested, said it was "sud-
den, cynical and short-sighted."
Paul told the subcommittee, af-
ter Herbert spoke out, that the
Pentagon is interested in a pro-
gram "that will develop discipline,
leadership and physical condition-
ing of the high school student."
Since the program is almost 50
years old, he said, "the army is
indeed remarkably slow in becom-
ing aware of its mistakes."

ROBERT S. McNAMARA
... high school ROTC

By BARBARA PASH
The present system of drafting young men into the armed
forces is not equitable, Prof. John White of the political science
department said recently.
Next June 30, the Universal Military Training and Service Act,
which has empowered the government to draft men, will expire. A
movement has developed to end the draft, he commented.
The draft is partly a military problem of providing adequate
manpower and how you get it. It is also an ethical problem. What

you have is a political solution,"
Prof. White noted.
Three Weaknesses
Advocates of the movement say
that there are three major weak-
nesses in the draft act: its in-
equity, the inefficiency of the
draft as an instrument of national
policy and that the armed forces
could be supplied entirely by vol-
unteers.
"In view of the international
situation, it will be necessary to
maintain a large peace-time mili-
tary capacity. One can't dispose
of this need simply by being op-
posed to the draft," he commented.
Selective Service System
Under the present law, every
male, upon reaching his 18th
birthday, must register with the
Selective Service System. He is
classified later.
Approximately 40-50 per cent
of a given eligible age group have
been deferred for inability to sat-
isfy the physical and mental
standards presently required for
induction.
Feelings of Injustice
"No system of conscription is
completely fair, even in wartime.
You arouse great feelings of in-
justice from people who see rel-
atively few being drafted and they
ask 'why me'," he continued.
Advocates of the movement also
note that recent international
crises have taught that highly
mobile forces already in being,
rather than the resources of the
draft, produce the military lever-
age needed.
Military Training
"The question is whether ithis
better to have a person who has
had some months or years of mili-
tary training or none at all, Prof.
White said.
Another important argument: for
extending the draft another four
years was the claim that without
it, the armed forces couldn't main-
tain necessary manpower levels.
Moreover, it is only the Army that
utilizes the Selective Service di-
rectly.
"The Army is most insistent
about keeping the draft because
if it comes to an all-volunteer
basis, the Army has always been
at a disadvantage to the Navy and
Marines," he continued.

PROF. JOHN WHITE
...'draft not equitable'
CONSTITUTION:
Kelly Predicts
Confinements
By The Associated Press
LANSING - If the proposed
state constitution is adopted, pro-
fessors and other educational offi-
cials wouldn't be allowed to serve
in the Legislature, even with a
leave of absence.
Atty. Gen. Frank J. Kelley is-
sued this interpretation yesterday
on a provision declaring that no
person could be a legislator while
simultaneously holding a position
in a state political sub-division,
defined by Kelley to include pub-
lic schools and state-supported in-
stitutions.
We of
MARILYN MARK'S
el come you to use
the facilities of our
BEAUTY SALON

I

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662-3055 or
662-4276

2222 Fuller Rd.
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VICKIE WELLMAN
has returned t
to the Church Street Salon
ON MARCH 4

i

discount records

World NewsRonu
By The Associated Press
UNITED NATIONS-The United States served notice yesterday
that it would not accept a bill this year for more than 32.02 per cent
of the total cost of the United Nations forces in the Congo and the
Middle East. United States Delegate Francis ,T. P. Plimpton stated
the position at a private meeting of a 21-nation committee that has
received five proposals that would make the United States pay more
than that. About 32.02 per cent is the percentage the United States
pays of the regular UN budget.
WASHINGTON-The House yesterday pulled tight the purse
strings of the House Education and Labor Committee headed by
Rep. Adam Clayton Powell (D-NY). Instead of the $697,000 Powell
had. sought for the two years of' the present Congress, the House
voted his committee $200,000 with the implication that if he needs
more later for studies and investigations, he will have to justify
every additional dollar. Presumably the committee will submit a new
budget next year. Of the $200,000 it approved by voice vote, the House
earmarked $25,000 for each of six subcommittees.
MOSCOW-Soviet election officials announced last night that
99.94 per cent of the electorate voted last Sunday in the election for
Parliament of the Russian Federation. Of these, 99.59 per cent voted
for the Communist-approved single slate of candidates, the Central
Electoral Commission announced. It also said that 32.8 per cent of
those elected were not Communist Party members. Results were
much the same in eight other republics that held elections.
* * * *
SAIGON-The young Vietnamese navy has taken over patrol of
South Viet Nam's coast from the United States 7th Fleet, military
sources said yesterday.
*i * * *
ST. PAUL--Democratic candidate Karl Rolvaag continued with
his apparently safe lead of 74 votes in the tense Minnesota governor
recount contest yesterday, as the special three-judge court delayed
rulings on 34 disputed ballots before it. *
* * *
WASHINGTON-The president of the National Association of
$roadcasters urged Congress yesterday to suspend for the 1964 elec-
tion campaign the law requiring that radio and television stations
give equal time to opposing political candidates.
NEW YORK--The New York Stock Exchange experienced last-
minute buying flurry after a dull day of trading yesterday. Many is-
sues closed at their best levels. The Dow-Jones Averages finished with
industrials up .92, rails up .90 and utilities up .10.

<1c___c <}o<)ctc__}r.__1_o (x -o
BHARATIYA KELA KENDRA
DANCERS
v from Northern India
CLASSICAL KATHAK DANCE
March 19, 8:30 P.M.
at TRUEBLOOD AUD.
Tickets: March 6, 7, 8 at the League
March 11-19 at Trueblood Aud.
Sponsored by the India Students Association
and the Women's League
x -h Vms m < = > < = o mn sm

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