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March 07, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-07

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTRSDfAY. MfAT WTI ll

MASONIC AUDITORIUMl~l.C- 1E13 '

Project Examines Education

Ford Grant
To Develop
U' Propert
Vice-Presicnt for the Dearborn
Center William E. Stirton an-

'BIG FIELD LAB':
Forestry Students Study
At Stinchfield Woods

MASONIC AUDITORIUM
DETROIT
I'l

* SAT., MAR. 23, 8:20

Commenting on the data which
the study will provide to guidance
and counseling programs, he said
that with the great deal of em-
pirical data "Project Talent" is
gathering "we hope to have great-
er information about students and
acquire better educational tools."

"Stinchfield Woods? Well, it's
just a big field lab owned by the
University; it's a great place for

nounced yesterday the appoint- forestry students to learn conser-I

CECIL 0. CREAL
. ..weakening ordinance?
SCHNEIDER:
Housing Law
Needs Power
"This city may pass a fair hous-
ing ordinance that cannot accom-
plish its goals," Dr. Albert F.
Schneider, Democratic candidate
for mayor, said recently.
"The ordinance needs strength-
ening, not weakening. A large pro-
portion of rental units and houses,
both old and new, will not be cov-
ered."
He said that Mayor Cecil 0.
Creal, incumbent Republican may-
oralty candidate, is "interested in
weakening the proposed ordinance
even more by eliminating that sec-
tion pertaining to financial insti-
tutions."
At the council working session,
Creal had termed the section "just
a harrassment."
Concerning the injunction sec-
tion, Dr. Schneider said that "the
civil and property rights of the
seller and landlord could more sen-
sibly be protected by adding a time
limit to the investigation and in-
junction."

ment of Edward L. Cushman as
chairman of the Committee for
the Development of Fair Lane for
the Dearborn campus.
Fair Lane, the home of the late
Henry Fords, was given to the
University, along with 210 acres
of land, by the Ford Motor Co.
in 1956. Included in this gift was
$6.5 million from the Ford Motor
Co. Fund for the building of class-
rooms, laboratories and offices on
the site of the estate. The com-
mittee is trying to raise $250,000
for the modernization of Fair
L a n e and t h e surrounding
grounds.
The estate consists of th Henry
Ford home, three service cottages
and many gardens, including the
famous Rose Garden. Cushman
announced that his committee
would try to have the funds raised
by the 100th anniversary of the
birth of Henry Ford, which is
July 30.
"The purpose of the drive and
its timing is to memorialize one
of the historic contributors to our
nation's economic growth by
creating a new and continuing in-
stitution in Michigan that will
seek to do as much to spark new
approaches to the intellectual and
cultural advancement of our total
society as Henry Ford's industrial
genius did for America's 20th cen-
tury mass production revolution,"
Cushman commented.
He outlined the general pur-
pose of Fair Lane, saying that it
would be used for conferences
among national leaders in various
fields; meetings of industrial,
business, labor, civic and cultural
groups and for lectures, concerts
and seminars for the students and
faculty of the Dearborn Center.
Thus it would serve as a "living
and productive memorial," Cush-
man explained.
UGLI Displays
Frost's Works
An exhibit of works by and
about Robert Frost and the years
he spent in Ann Arbor is on dis-
play at the UGLI this month,
Marjory H. Drake, assistant head
of the rare book department, an-
nounced recently.

vation techniques, study tree
identification, and learn sawmill
operations; faculty members carry
on research out there, too."
So says University Forest Direc-
tor Frank Murray in describing
the woods located 15 miles north-
west of Ann Arbor near Portage
Lake, acquired by the University
in 1925. A lumberman's wife, An-
nie T. Stinchfield of Detroit, do-
nated the money in memory of her
husband to be used for a scholar-
ship in the natural resources
school. It was felt, however, that
the purchase of a tract of land
for the forestry department would
put the funds to better use.
The first plot of land purchased
was 320 acres consisting mostly of
pastureland with a section of
Alumni Group
Founds Camp
In Boyne City
The University Alumni Associa-
tion has established a new camp
for alumni, students, and faculty
members and their families.
As the result of a naming con-
test in which 125 alumni partici-
pated, the camp will be called
Camp Michigania, inhonor of the
original name of the University :
the University of Michigania.
The camp, located in Boyne
City on Lake "Walloon, was pur-
chased by the Alumni Association
last December. During the sum-
mer, as a special feature, faculty
members will serve as discussion
leaders for seminars in the areas
of their specialty.
There are several openings on
the camp staff in the following
areas: waterfront, riding, field
sports, arts and crafts, riflery
and archery and child care. In-
terviews for interested students
will be held by camp director Wil-
liam B. Stegath from 9:30 a.m.
to noon and from 1:30 p.m. to 4
p.m. Friday in the Summer Place-
ment Office of the SAB.
Only those qualified by exper-
ience or ratings such as the Water
Safety Instructor are eligible.

g r a z e d hardwoods. ("Grazed,"
Murray recently explained, "means
that sheep or other animals have
trampled down the low-growing
plants and packed the earth down
among the trees.")
Successive Additions
Today the area extends over 890
acres of forest land, irregular bits
and patches having been added
up until 1955.
Predominant species of trees in-
clude black and white oaks, hick-
ories and many varieties of west-
ern and northern American pines.
Scotch pine and European black
pine, two species which normally
don't grow on the American con-
tinent, were imported as seedlings
from Europe. The soil is sand,
gravel and clay. "Most of it is just
poor farmland," Murray observed.
The woods abound with wild
life. Rabbits, foxes, squirrels, wes-
sels, badgers and raccoons dig dens
there. An occasional coyote wan-
ders through. Deer, while prefer-
ring meadowlands, are increasing
in number. In fact, their numbers
became so great in 1945 that open
season hunting was declared in
the county until 1949. No hunting
is allowed at present, but the laws
are hard to enforce. Assistant For-
est Director Howard Hammond
plays the role of ranger and actu-
ally lives in the woods.
Public Hikes
The area is open to the public
for hiking. There is an extensive
network of trails and roads to
facilitate the logging operations.
Camping and picnicking are not
permitted. The fire hazard is too
great a risk without a larger staff
of rangers.
Besides. being a field demonstra-
tion area and research laboratory,
the woods provide money-making
opportunities for forestry students.
All work such as planting, thin-
ning and sawmill operation is
done by students. Although some
work is required of everyone, much
is paid for on an hourly basis. A
crew of ten forestry majors thin-
ned nearly 50 acres this winter
and past fall, arising early on Sat-
urday morning and spending the
whole day in the woods.
Stinchfield Woods is a self-sup-
porting operation. Its sawmill,
built on funds donated by the
senior class of 1942 and the For-
estry Club, makes enough -money
from its operations to support the
entire enterprise. The mill was
built by student labor, and mate-
rials from the woods were used.
Corner Posts
Interesting exceptions are the
doorposts and corner posts which
were brought from Chile and do-
nated to the woods by a Chilean
graduate student.
According to Murray there are
nearly one and a half million
board feet of potential lumber
standing in the woods. The supply
is increasing all the time. During
the summer choice wood is cut
into lumber and cured while other
wood is sawn into firewood. All
work, once again, is done by
students.
Today Paul Bunyan is a college
boy.

TONIGHT THRU SATURDAY 8:00
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS PRESENT
OPERA DEPT., SCHOOL OF MUSIC IN
Albert Lortzing's great comic opera
THE HUNTERS
("Der Wildschutz") in English
with Prof. Ralph Herbert of the Met.
$1.75, 1.25; FRIDAY & SATURDAY-$2.00, 1.50
Mendelssohn box office open 12:30-8:00 daily
LATECOMERS SEATED
DURING INTERMISSION ONLY

("'J"%I ,ef ,r/
COP'lf 4Y4aiVKOPZO /7WHVORCATS7W
FANTASMA (Prokofieff); JEST OF CARDS (Krenek)
DIVERTISSEMENT (Francois Esprit Auber)
$2, $3, $4, $5
Mail Orders to Masonic Auditorium, 500 Temple, Detroit
Encl. Self-Addressed, Stamped Env.

J
a
I
i
i

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER presents

JEAN- LEON
DEISTIINE
and his
HAITIAN DANCE
COMPANY
... one of the finest
dancers of .our day.."
--Walter Terry
N.Y. Herald Tribune

MEDICAL SCHOOL PROGRAM:
Offer Special Student Research Plan

By PHILIP SUTIN
The Medical School special
studies program, now entering its
fourth year, offers medical stu-
dents extra research studies, Prof.
John M. Weller of the internal
medicine department and director
of the program, explained re-
cently.
Incoming medical students are
chosen for the prog'am on the
basis of their previous grades and
their willingness to work in it, he
said. Approximately 10 per cent
of the school participates in the
program.
Special studies research work
is available in all Medical School
departments and in related non-
medical school departments.
Freshmen Research
The research is begun during
the summer before the freshman
year and continued during the
summer after it. In addition, the
students attend bi-weekly semi-
nars during their freshman and
sophomore y e a r s in Medical
School.
The special work is suspended
during the junior year, because
the students are busy with clinical
studies-part of the regular Med-
ical School curriculum.
CAMP SEQUOIA,
New York
Ed Shapiro will interview
Summer Placement Service
212 S. A. B.
Thursday and Friday
March 7, 1:30-5
March 8, 8-12 & 1:30-2
Staff Openings &
Camp Nurse

During the school's senior year,
all medical students have a three-
month vacation, and t h r e e
months of selected studies. During
these two three-month periods,
students in the special program
complete their research work,
Prof. Weller said.
Faculty Advisors
Students work closely with their
faculty advisors, he noted, and
attempt to develop a close tutor-
ial relationship.
"It is hard to measure the
tangible results," Prof. Weller de-
clared. He noted that it is too
early to determine whether the
program will develop medical re-
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
THURSDAY, MARCH 7
Day Calendar
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.-Bureau of In-
dustrial Relations Personnel Techniques
Seminar No. 78-Kenneth Porter, direc-
tor of research, Employers' Association
of Detroit; and Robert E. Schwaub,
manager employe relations, Detroit Ed-
ison Co., Detroit, "Establishing and Ad-
ministering Systematic Procedures for
White Collar Complaints": Third Floor
Conference Rm., Mich. Union.
4:00 p.m.-Pharmacy Alumni Lecture
-Dr. Takeru Highuchi, Prof. of Physi-
(Continued on Page 5)

searchers because all students
enter a year of internship after
graduation, and better than two-
thirds of all medical students go
into specialized studies after that.
Prof. Weller speculated that the
program also helps draw high
calibre students do the Medical
School, as few schools in the
country offer this research oppor-
tunity to interested students.
Donate Profits
Of Michigras
The Woman's Athletic Associa-
tion and the Michigan Union have
decided on the distribution of the
$11,230 in profits resulting from
last year's Michigras.
The largest chunk of the prof-
its, $3000, will go to the Medical
School Deans Discretionary Re-
search Fund to be used to research
children's diseases.
The Ann Arbor Fresh Air Camp
and the Ann Arbor Campership
Fund will each receive $2000. One
thousand dollars will go to the
United N a t i o n s International
Childrens' Emergency Fund.
The WAA will take $865 for its
own operating expenses and the
remaining $825 will be given to
the World University Service.
The sums were agreed on by
the Union finance committee and
the WAA board.
HELD OVER
THRU WEDNESDAY

ANN ARBOR HIGH AUDITORIUM

SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 1963,

8:30 P.M.

tickets $2.50 and $2.00
available at Bob Marshall's Bookshop
or write D.A.C., P.O. Box 179, Ann Arbor, Mich.

U

MICHIGAN UNION
CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL

o

W. . SNODGRASS
Sunday ... 8:00 P.M.... Union Ball Room

C CINEMA GUILD Pejeht4
iursday and Friday at 7 and 9 Saturday and Sunday at 7 and 9
ELIZABETH TAYLOR in Jean, Renoir's Classic French Drama
TENNESSEE WILLIAM'S LA GRANDE ILLUSION
CAT ON JEAN GABIN-PIERRE FRESNAY
L HOT TIN ROOF Mi..... . . u a-' vhp Yn ul

I

Dial 2-6264
Shows at 1:00-2:55-5:00
7:05 and 9:18
SACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS!
including

A

BEST ACTOR
SBEST ACTRESS
SBEST SONG
IT IS DIFFERENT.ITIS DARING.
MOST OFALLIN ITS OWN TERRI-
FYING WAY, IT IS A LOVE STORY.

I ~..

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