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March 06, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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________________________________________________________________ V A L4'~~1 .Dial~

mull ti , IV63

1._

rbertViews 'The Hunters'

University Legal Status
Promotes Independence

THREE DIMENSIONS:
McClure Outlines Sculpture Curriculum

By DEBORAH BEATTIE.
he opening of the music
Dol's production of Albert Lort-
's comic opera, "The Hunters"
er Wildschutz"), was. actually
American premiere according
Prof. Ralph Herbert of the
ic school, who sings the lead
and handles stage direction
the opera.
The Hunters" has not been per-
ned in the United States by a
or opera comnpany since 1860,
ess it was in a German area
1 as Milwaukee. This is because
characters are so typically
man and the dialogue in Ger-
1 is long, Prof. Herbert explain-
onsequently Lortzing is almost
nown in the United States al-
igh he is well known in Ger-
Iy.
Play Opera
rof. Herbert describes "The
iters" as a light, charming play
:a. It was written for the well-
cated middle class of the first
' of the 19th century and the
ior which deals with the aris-
acy ranges from near-slap-
k to sophisticated satire. The
of "The Hunters" is a come-
>f disguises in reverse..
he University Players produc-
is an English translation by
conductor, Prof. Josef Blatt of
music school. Prof. Herbert be-
es that the English translation
hie only. way to do., the opera,
)use the lengthy, dialogue in
man would be comprehensible
uch a small portion of the au-
ice.
3enerally speaking, everything
ild be played in the language
roup Studies
se of 'Testin
he Michigan' School Testing,
vice is holding a conference on
use of testing in elementary
secondary schools today in the
higan Union.
rincipal speakers will be fiar-
Seashore, who is giving the
ping address, .at 9:30 a.m. on
by Test?", and John C. Flana-
who is giving a luncheon ad-
;s at 12:30 p.m. on a nation-
e survey of aptitudes, achieve-
its and interests of high school
tents.

DER WILDSCHUTZ-The German aristocracy becomes involved
in a comedy of disguises in reverse as an old schoolmaster, played
by Prof. Ralph lerbert, well known concert end operatic artist,
becomes confused about the identity of a baroness.

of the audience. When comedies
are played in the original language
a great deal is lost to the audi-
ence, particularly if there is dia-
logue. If the audience doesn't fol-
low the words, it cah discover only
the coarsest humor," he said.
Prefers Comedy
As a voice teacher, Prof. Her-
bert, who is also associated with
the Metropolitan Opera, prefers
comic opera for students, because
"they do not kill themselves on
heavy dramatic roles." If a student
is not yet an accomplished artist,
it is much harder for him to do
the :harder roles, he believes. When
the audience- laughs at something

clumsy in a comic opera, it-is wel-
come but it can destroy a serious
opera, he said.
Discussing the singer's problem
of learning to act and continue
singing, Prof. Herbert cited the
need for leniency on the part of
the audience. "Some people with
great voices have difficulty acting
and it must be remembered that
they are there primarily to sing,"
he said.
Performances of "The Hunters"
will be given through Saturday,
March 9 at 8:00 p.m. at Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. The box of-
fice is open daily from 12:30 to
5:00 p.m.

By RUTH HETMANSKI
The University, Wayne State
University and Michigan State
University are independent of lo-
cal and state laws because of their
special status in the Michigan
Constitution, a representative of
the University's legal office said
recently.
The legislative, executive and
judiciary are usually thought of
as the three parts of government;
in Michigan the field of educa-
tion is the fourth.
The State Constitution specific-
ally provides for administration of
state colleges, making them an
arm of the state government. This
is why they are not subject to
regulation by local government.
They are also not liable to regula-
tion by state law any more than,
for example, the Legislature is
subject to regulation by the state
supreme court.
General Supervision
Article III, section V of the State
Constitution says that "the Board
of Regents shall have the general
supervision and the direction and
control of all expenditures from
the University funds." This sec-
tion applies to the University's Re-
gents and similar ones exist for
WSU and MSU. This has been con-
strued by the Michigan Supreme
Court as giving the Regents inde-.
pendent control over all Univer-
sity regulations.
The implications of these provi-
Schedule Talk
Op1 Pharmacy
Prof. Takeru Higuchi of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin will speak on
"Mechanisms of Amide Formation
in Aqueous Solution by Succinic,
Tartaric, Citric and Related Acids"
at 4 p.m. today in Rm. 1200 Chem-
istry Bldg.
"Application of Solubility Meas-
urement "to Pharmaceutical Prob-
lems" will be the topic of a sec-
ond pharmacy lecture by Prof. Hi-
guchi, at 4 p.m. March 7 in Rm.
1300 Chemistry Bldg.
'U' Fraternities
Report Burglaries
Threemore University fraterni-
ties joined the Zeta Psi house as
victims in a recent rash of bur-
glaries Monday, when Sigma Phi
Epsilon, Chi Psi and Theta Chi re-
ported thefts totaling $162.aThe
money was stolen from wallets,.
fraternity members said. All four
of the thefts occurred early Sun-
day or Monday morning.
Officers noted that a number of
rooms on the second and third
floors of the.. Chi Psi house were
ransacked by the thieves but the
prowlers entered only those rooms
which were not occupied at the
time.

sions are many. The recent con-
flict between the city of Ann Ar-f
bor and the University in regard
to University violation of local zon-
ing laws in its Oxford Housing
Project is one example of this.
State regulations also do not ap-
ply to these three universities. Re-
gents committees set up fire and
health regulations for the Univer-
sity. City and state fire marshals
act in an advisory capacity in
making regulations and creating
alarm systems, but rules are made
by the Regents themselves.
Some Control
Other demands are exerted -on
the Regents. The Legislature has
the responsibility of maintaining
the universities; it has some con-
trol, therefore, over what rules
govern them. Legislative power is
limited also. A recent opinion by
Frank J. Kelley, Michigan attor-
ney-general, states that the Legis-
lature may not make specific de-
mands for the use of the general
funds appropriated by it to the
universities.'
HRB Moti on
Tops Agenda
Student Government Council,
with an abbreviated agenda to-
night, will consider bias proced-
ures and a motion for censure of
the Human Relations Board.
Prof. Robert G. Harris of the
Law School will appear before
Council to answer questions on his
plan for implementation of Re-
gents' Bylaw 2.14, Council's own
anti-bias regulations and its au-
thority to withdraw - recognition
from student organizations found
in violation of the rules.
Council will probably support
the Harris recommendations and
ask him to appear before the Re-
gents on March 22 in a request for
final approval.
Human Relations Board Chair-
man David Aroner, '64, will also
appear before Council, which will
consider a motion from its execu-
tive committee to. censure the
Board for its failure to consult
with Council before taking picket-
ing action two weeks ago. Several
Council members expressed con-
cern that the Board seemed to be
acting in the name of Student
Government Council.
In other business, Council will
discuss a motion to be presented
by Howard Abrams, '63, in support
of the right of individual dormi-
tories to set dress regulations and
whichvquestions administration
supervision in this area.
Gary Gilbar '65A&D, .will ask
Council to approve a proposal re-
quiring "knowledge tests" for SGC
candidates which would be admin-
istered by a non-partisan board.
The proposal is aimed at providing
better informed candidates for
election to Council.

Sculpture is. an art existing in
three dimensions, and students of
the introductory sculpture classes
must deal with problems which are
non-existent in painting.
Prof. Thomas F. McClure of the
architecture college organizes the
curriculum of his section of the
course around a series of problems.
An example of such a problem
might be "Organize a. group of
related forms within a sphere."
The objective of such a plan
is to "offer the students exper-
ience in all materials and to spur,
them to do a thing never done,
before . . . in yet another way,"
Prof. McClure said recently.

Develop Expression
The students have a wide range
of materials to choose from, each
containing its own intrinsic prob-
lem through which the student
must develop his exprersion.
Selection of material might be
in the traditional vein of stone
carving or bronze casting, or the
student might prefer a modern
sculptural aesthetic, like the weld-
ed metal structures which build up
by acetelyne torch fusions of
lengths of metal.
Going beyond the limits of one
single medium, a new level of
originality can be seen in the
conglomerate "junk" structures.
These artifacts might begin as dis-
carded tin cans, automobile parts
and rubbish but emerge into in-
geniously forged sculpture
Human Figure
Since its inception with prehis-
toric man, the subject of sculp-
tural art has been life and more
essentially the human figure.
Thus the classes may meet with
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Alpha Phi Omega, Gamma Pi Chap-
ter, Reguiar Meeting, Mar. 6, 7 p.m'.,
Union, Rm. 3D.
Graduate Student Council, Special
Meeting-To interview S C Candidates,
Mar. 7, 7:30 p.m., Rac bm Bldg., W.
Conf. Rm., 4th Floor. Open to all gradu-
ate students.
* * *
International Students Assoc., Lun-
cheon Meeting, Mar. 6, 12-1 p.m., Inter-
national Ctr. Speaker: James Randall:
"Race Relations & Civil Rights."
Univedsity Lutheran Chapel, Lenten
Vespers, "when I Survey the wondrous
Cross," Mar. 6, 7, & 10 p.m., 1511 wash.
, * * *
WAA Coeducational Fencing -Club,
Meeting, Mar. :7, 7:30 p.m., WAB.. Every-
one welcome.
Wesleyan Guild, Coffee Hour, 4 p.m..
Wesley Lounge; Holy Communion, 5:10
p.m., Chapel; Grads-Supper. & Pro-
gram, S p.m., Pine Room; Mar. 6.
*
Cercie Francais, Baratin, Mar. 7, 3-5
P.m., 3050 FB; Concours de Poesie-..
final entrance, all entrants should reg-
ister by Mar. 8 at 2076 FB.
** *.
Gilbert & Sullivan Society, Rehearsal
for "The Gondoliers," Mar. 6, 7:30 p.mi.,.
Union.

rc..7! MICH IGAN

Dial 5-6290

---

That preposterous professor is on the loose again!

a model who sits in various poses
to offer through study of and
feeling for the living human body.
Concerning the degree of ab-
straction in the rendering of these
figures and works done without a
model, Prof. McClure commented
that "although some students work
quite representationally, the re-
sults are never completely realistic.
Traditional Vein
Urged to assert originality and
freedom of expression, the stu-
dents are never forced to work
in a traditional vein unless they
desire to.
"Some people seem to have a
natural ability to work in form,"
Prof. McClure said, but he feels
that there is no trait necessary
to the successful sculpture stu-

dent beyond talent and ingenuity.
Before entering the sculpture
classes, the student must take the
basic studio course as an orien-
tation in the fundamental skills
of all the arts. Completing this
three-semester prerequisite, the
student can enter a beginning
sculpture course as early as the
fourth semester.
Practical Art
Along with the practical art
courses, the students are required
to take history of art courses.
Prof. McClure spoke optimis-
tically concerning the possible
futures for students of sculpture.
"Without a question there is a
good market: many people are
making a living in sculpture now
who couldn't do it 10 years ago."

I

MAO MURRAY NNYLO
Shows at 1,3,5179pm.Matinees 65c
Sat 135, 9 p.m. Nights and Sundays 90c
Feature15 min. later Children 50c

II

L

STARTING FRIDAY
"DIAMOND HEAD"

.1

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER presents

Administration Experts Collect
Data on Student Attrition Rate

JEAN-LEON
DESTI'NE

s

Two medical school administra-
tiori experts visited the Medical
School yesterday and Monday as
part of a nationwide study of
student attrition rates.

;ontinuing Tonight thru Saturday

U-M PLAYERS
present
OPERA DEPT., SCHOOL OF MUSIC
-n

Albert Lortzing's great comic opera

HUl

THE~i
NTER
("Der Wildschutz")
In English

Assistant Dean for Admissions
and Student Personnel Davis G.
Johnson of the State University of
New York Upstate Medical Center
and Dr. Edwin B. Hutchins, direc-
tor of basic research for the As-
sociation of American Medical Col,
leges met with Medical School
deans, the admissions committee
and medical students during their
two day stay.
Their visit is part of a 10-year
comparative study in attrition
rates. Associate Dean Charles J.
Tupper explained that the two
were collecting data and informa-
tion on application procedures,
r cords of non-completion and the
frequency of drop-outs due to ill-
ness, academic failure or lack of
motivation.
Tupper noted that the Medical
School had a 12-15 per cent attri--
tion rate over four years which
compares favorably with the na-
tional average.
While in other areas such a rate
would seem remarkably good, in
medicine it is a matter of concern
and efforts are being made to re-
duce this percentage, Tupper said.
The Medical School has a fresh-
man enrollment of 200 each year.
However, the attrition rate and
small amount of failures pushes
each Mlass somewhat over that fig-
ure.
New Deadline Set
For Year Abroad
A change has been announced
in the deadline for filing appli-
cations for the Michigan-Wiscon-
son sponsored junior year abroad
program. The date has been ex-
tended to March 11. This is an
extension of the original March
i deadline. Students interested in
obtaining information on study
programs abroad may contact
Prof. James J. Ginden.

A N1N ARBOR HIGH AU DITORIAUM
SUNDAY, MARCH 10, 1963 8:30 P.M.
tickets $2.50 and $2.00
available at.Bob Marshall's Bookshop
or write D.A.C., P.O. Box 179, Ann Arbor, Mich.

'

and heis

HAITIAN DANCE
COMPANY
. one of the finest
dancers of our day..."
-Walter Terry
N.Y. Herald Tribune

I

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.....

Dial 8-6416

ENDING TONIGHT

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
ANNUAL PURIM DEBATE
Sunday, March 10 .. . 8P.M.
"The Latke, The Hamantash and H igher Education
in the Cold War"

with Prof. Ralph Herbert,
of the Metropolitan Opera Company,

3

NOMINATED FOR
ACADEMY AWARDS

lIGHT, TOMORROW-$1.75, 1.25

FR., SAT.-$2.00, 1.50

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre box office
open from 12:30 daily
CURTAIN-8 :00 SHARP
Latecomers seated after overture
and during intermissions only

"MASTROIANN I
should get
The Academy Award
for Best Acting!"
-Time
JOSEPHLE.VLMNEmo
MARCELLO
Mastroia
NfR MSACTAektRO ge.... fw ci't

BEST ACTOR
BEST DIRECTION
BEST ORIGINAL STORY
nnil!;5

The Latke
Louis L. Orlin, Ancient Near
East Hist. & Lit.
Anatol Rapoport, Mathematical
Biol.
James V. McConnell, Psychology

The Hamantash
Paul Cohen, Chinese Hist.
H. Michael Eisler, Univ.
TV Producer
Bernard Galler, Computing
Center
Roger Heyns, V-P, Academic Affairs

Carl Cohen, Philosophy
MODERATOR

Admission Free

Refreshments

Divorce.

1429 Hill St.

I

Italian Style
,INER CANNCE fISVlALAWA9D8EIC O

Michigan Union
Creative Arts Festival

Ic
,a

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
S.D.A. STUDENT ASSOCIATION

Thursday-"Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner"

announces the topic series:

Shows at 1:00-2:55

lownwommompmmPma

DIAL
2-6264

presents

The Art of Poetry
W. D. SNODGRASS, Pulitzer Prize Poet, will present a
reading of his poetry on Sunday, March 10th at
8:00 P.M. in the Michigan Union Ballroom.
FACULTY POETRY READING HOUR: Mr. E. G. Burrows,
Professor Donald Hall, and Professor James Squires
will read their poetry followed by an informal
Coffee Hour on Monday, March 11 th at 8:00 P.M.
in the Michiaan Union Ballroom.

5:00-7:05 and 9:18
IIMS Feature at 1-3-5:07
7:15 and 9:25
5 ACADEMY AWARDS
NOMINATIONS ! including
T BEST ACTOR * BEST ACTRESS
* BEST SONG
It is different.
It is daring.
Most of all, in its
own terrifying
way, it is

MAN, RELIGION and SCIENCE
SATURDAY, March 9, at 4:00 P.M.
Room 528D--Student Activities Bldg.

"TO BE OR NOT TO BE: THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE
IN A TIME r CRISIS"
rrederick E. J. Harder, Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Education, Andrews University

Saturday, March 23:
3:30 P.M.-Rm. 528D
S.A.B.

"Shechem in the Light of the Bible and
Recent Excavations"
Siegfried H. Horn, Ph.D.
Professor of Archaeology and History of Antiquity
Andrews University

I

Saturday, April 20:
400 PM.--- m.28

"The Nature of the Fossil Record"
RicharrM Ritlind. Ph. n

1111

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