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March 06, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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SENT TO UN:
Cuban Letter Complains
Of U.S. Plat for Attack
HAVANA (P)--Cuba sent a list of complaints against the United
States to United Nations Secretary-General U Thant yesterday, ac-
cusing Washington of planning an attack on Cuba that would engulf
the world in thermonuclear war.
The 4000-word letter from Cuban Foreign Minister Raul Roa
carried a veiled offer to talk out differences in meetings with
United States officials. Roa told Thant that "there is no better way in
a crisis like this than peaceful

New Program Builds Freedom

Over Labor Objections

NAACP SPEECH:
Rockefeller Criticizes
Slow Civil Rights Effort
ALBANY (/)-New York Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller charged yes-
terday that President John F. Kennedy's 1963 civil rights program
came "two years too late" and ignored three of the President's most
important campaign pledges.
Rockefeller's speech was followed by Roy Wilkins, executive
secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of

GOV. NELSON ROCKEFELLER
. . hits administration policy
CUT COSTS:
Dilon Notes
IRS Revision
WASHINGTON (M)-The Inter-
nal Revenue Service will stream-
line itself starting this year, hop-
ing to save taxpayers $5 million a
year, Secretary of the Treasury
Douglas Dillon announced yester-
day.
Some regional offices will be
merged or their work load cut, and
two regional offices will be elim-
inated. This is designed to reduce
the work force, reportedly by about.
200 jobs, and cut down on the
overhead of office and equipment.
expenses.
A spokesman for the service de-
scribed the reorganization as a
consolidation of overhead man-
agement and supervision, leaving
intact all services to taxpayers. He
said large field offices will be kept
in all cities, which will lose re-
gional or district offices.
The first step will be to trim the
operations in 12 of the present 62
district offices.
I R 7 70 11 n "R

" Colored People, who told the meet-
ing that the governor had a good
civil rights record.
Wilkins said the Kennedy ad-
ministration had "failed to keep
certain Democratic platform prom-
ises," but Atty. Gen. Robert Ken-
nedy had filed 22 suits to protect
Negro voting rights. "No other at-
torney general has ever filed so
many, he added.
NAACP Meeting
Rockefeller and Wilkins address-
ed 750 persons at a meeting of the
New York conference of the
NAACP.
Rockefeller, a potential oppon-
ent of Kennedy in next year's na-
tional election, has been increas-
ingly critical of Kennedy on civil
rights and other national issues.
Rockefeller concentrated in his
speech yesterday on the civil rights
message the President sent to Con-
gress last Thursday. Kennedy call-
eor setiengthening voting rights
for Negroes and new efforts to
desegregate public schools.
Campaign Pledge
Rockefeller said Kennedy had
pledged in the 1960 campaign that
enactment of the Democratic civil
rights platform would be "the first
order of business" in 1961. In the
light of that promise, Rockefeller
said, the proposals are "two years
_ too late."
The governor said the Presi-
dent's recommendations covered
_ only 5 of 28 legislative recommen-
dations by the federal Civil Rights
Commission.
Rockefeller said Kennedy had
"once again remained completely
ealoof from the latest efforts .to end
filibusters in the Senate, which are
ea principal means of frustrating
civil rights legislation."
Wilkins said that the "Kennedy
, administration has done somenSig-
a nificant things on the executive
*level" in the field of civil rights.
Rockefeller's criticisms of Ken-
nedy drew no response from the
t audience. He was cheered when he
concluded with a pledge that New
York state "shall remain the pio-
neer, the leader, the great moral
example in assuring first-class
citizenship to every American."
7w

'BasePolicy
On Nuclear
Deterrents,
Opposition Decries
Skybolt 'Cover Up'
By The Associated Press
LONDON-Britain's Conserva-
tive government yesterday won
parliamentary approval of a uni-
fied defense command despite La-
borite charges that it was a ma-
nauver to divert attention from the
"Skybolt fiasco."
The House of Commons rejected
333-237, a Labor no-confidence
motion along straight party lines.
The plan for reorganizing the
three armed services under ' one
cordinated command was then en-
dorsed 232-237.
Patrick Gordon-Walker, Labor
defense spokesman, had argued
Britain could best help NATO by
improving its own conventional
forces and scrapping Britain's nu-
clear arms.
Charges Cover-up
He charged the government's
new plan was merely to cover up
the "Sklbolt fiasco" after the Unit-
ed States announced abandonment
of the missile.
British Defense Minister Peter
Thorneycroft replied that Britain's
policy now is based on a nuclear
deterrent, to be supplemented late
in the decade by Polaris submar-
ines built with United States help.
Thorneycroft said Labor assum-
ed that if Britain is threatened an
ally will be ready to help in its
defense. "I believe they are right,
but it is a huge assumption to
make," he said.
Challenges Opposition
Thorneycroft challenged the op-
position to say it would be possible
to beat back a major Soviet at-
tack on Western Europe without
nuclear weapons.
"A proper defense policy must
be based on a' balance of both nu-
clear and conventional forces in
Europe and that is our policy," he
asserted.
He said Labor had failed to put
forward any alternative policy "or
is fearful of doing so."

negotiations and discussions be-
tween governments."
Provocative Acts
The letter, which Roa asked to
be distributed to all UN delega-
tions, spelled out what the Cubans
called provocative acts and state-
ments from the United States gov-
ernment; congressmen and Cuban
exiles. It said the situation between
the United States and Cuba has
been deteriorating since the Octo-
ber Soviet missile crisis.
He charged that "steps are pres-
ently being taken by the United
States to prepare aggression
against Cuba."
Coinciding with the announce-
ment of Roa's letter, the armed}
force ministry charged that the
United States staged six land and
sea incidents around Cuba recent-
ly.
Approach Vessel
In one, the ministry said, a
United States Navy destroyer had
"the insolence" of advancing to
meet a Soviet merchant vessel as
it approached Havana harbor.
A Havana radio broadcast claim-
ed that three United States de-
stroyers harassed another fishing
boat elsewhere for more than three
hours.
In Washington, a Pentagon
spokesman denied the broadcast
report and said that "we have no
knowledge of any such incident. No
Navy destroyer attempted to cap-
ture any Cuban fishing boats, or
threatened to do so."
The armed forces ministry also
charged that United States Navy
craft molested and impaired the
work of two fishing boats.
Near the Guantanamo Navy
base, it said that Cuban guards
were stoned by United States
forces inside the base compound.
The government charged that
American guards had opened fire
on Cuban territory.
Request Order
On Integration
JACKSON-The parents of ten
Negro children asked a federal
court Monday to order the first
public school integration in Mis-
sissippi.
It was the first such suit to be
filed in the state by Negro resi-
dents. Mississippi Attorney-Gen-
eral Joseph Patterson pledged that
all resources of his office would be
used in defense of the suit.

RAUL ROA
... Cuban accusations
NATO FORCE:
Ambassador
To Discuss
Allied Force
BONN (P)-United States Am-
bassador Livingston T. Merchant
arrived in Bonn yesterday to dis-
cuss West Germany's role in a sea-
borne multi-nation nuclear force
which President John F. Kennedy
has 'proposed for the Western alli-
ance.
The Soviet Union again de-
nounced the plan as 'increasing
the tempo of the arms race and
said the Kremlin would have to
reshape its policies if the Kenne-
dy proposals are.adopted.
The United States has pledged
three Polaris submarines to a mul-
ti-nation nuclear force under the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion. Sources say it also would in-
clude 25 surface ships, each carry-
ing 25 Polaris missiles and manned
by men of participating nations.s
Merchant explained the Presi-
dent's ideas to the NATO allies at
a meeting in Paris and now is
toring NATO capitals to discuss
details.
Merchant tomorrow opens three
days of meetings with West Ger-
man Chancellor Konrad Adenauer
and other West German leaders.

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(EDITOR'S NOTE: The Program of
Strategic Hamlets, little known to
the outside world, but vital to de-
fense of South Vietnam against
the Viet Cong Communist guerrillas,
was recently described by Joseph L.
Brent, chief of the United States
Operations Mission in Vietnam in
an address before the Saigon Lions
Club. It is here reproduced in part,
through the facilities of the South-
east Asia Treaty Organization.)
By JOSEPH L. BRENT
Chief of the United States
Operations Mission in South Vietnami
SAIGON-The Strategic Ham-
let Program as it is now develop-
ed is, as the leaders of South Viet-
nam have wished from the moment
of its conception, the foundation
for a far reaching social and eco-
nomic revolution.
It is a program based on the
people and is of them, by them,
and for them. It is the absolute
antithesis of everything that com-
munism stands for. It starts, after
military clearing operations -
where necessary-have been com-
pleted, with the building of the
strategic h a m I e t. Immediately
thereafter, and for the first time
in the history of Vietnam, the peo-
ple then elect their own hamlet
chief and council members, from
among their own number, and
form their own militia to .defend
their own homes. This protection
is reinforced by the army, the civil
guard and the self defense corps
(who either live in the hamlet or
are within a few minutes of an
alarm passed by radio).
Although the United States
Operations Mission is. involved in
these first phases of the creation
of a strategic hamlet in such ways
as assisting any families which
may have had to be relocated in
order to join the newly organized
community, in administrative
training for the civic action teams
which first indoctrinate the vil-
lagers in the new way of life, and
later for the elected hamlet lead-
ers, and in helping with radio in-
stallations, our real work is in as-
sisting the government of South
Vietnam help its people...
Rural Progress
The government and the USOM
have jointly developed a new way
of accelerating rural progress. This
consists of asking the province
chiefs and their staffs to draw up
provincial rehabilitation and de-
velopment plans focused on social
and economic areas which, for one
reason or another have been over-
looked in the past and which rep-
resent opportunities to achieve
immediate developmental and psy-
IT'S HERE!
A NIGHT
ON THE WORLD
MICHIGAN LEAGUE
Sat., March 16th-9 :00

chological impact. These plans dif-
fer from province to province ac-
cording to local need and really
constitute the heart of the Stra-
tegic Hamlet Program. They are
reviewed in Saigon by the govern-
ment of South Vietnam's Inter-
ministerial Strategic Hamlet Com-
mittee and by USOM technicians.
To strengthen this effort USOM,
at the request of the government
of South Vietnam, is placing rep-
resentatives and resources in most
of the provinces to work directly
with the province chiefs and local
UN Dehigates
Fight Increase
In Assessment
UNITED NATIONS (AM)-- The
United States yesterday was re-
ported taking a stiff attitude to-
ward proposals for it to pay more
for the. Congo, Middle East and
other United Nations peacekeep-
ing operations.
Adlai E. Stevenson, Francis T.
P. Plimpton and Albert F. Bender
Jr. of the United States delega-
tion called on Secretary-General
U Thant before a committee
meeting where the United States
had promised to state its posi-
tion.
Stevenson said the United
States was sticking close to the
limit established by Congress for
the United States share of any
U.N. budget assessed against,
member countries on a compul-
sory basis.
The limit is 331/3 per cent and
the committee has got half a
dozen proposals that would re-
quire the United States to exceed
it, because they would have poorer
countries pay proportionately less
and wealthier countries propor-
tionately more than they do of
the regular U.N. budget.

Rural Dispensaries
Rural dispensaries, to be estab-
lished during 1963 at selected stra-
tegic locations, will service many
thousand hamlets which present-
ly do not have facilities of this
kind available.
To complement the above pro-
grams, which will come from the
government to the people, the gov-
ernment has decided to institute a
program which will originate with
See SOUTH, Page 5

inhabitants. They will also work
closely with the local military
commanders and the military as-
sistance advisory group sector ad-
visors, so as to achieve full co-
ordination between military and
civil operations.
Twenty thousand tons of chem-
ical fertilizers sufficient to in-
crease rice crop yields up to 250
per cent on the lands where they
are applied, will be distributed to
families in strategic hamlets in
the poorer provinces of central
Vietnam in the first six months of
1963.
New Schools
Hundreds of new school-rooms
will be built in strategic hamlets
in 1963, and students will be pro-
vided with school books, pencils
and paper. Special (crash) courses
for teacher training are now being
developed, and the use of radio ats
a teaching medium will soon be
studied.
Plant, insect and roCent con-
trol will be introduced country-
wide, following up the successful
experiences of this autumn, in
central Vietnam, where bumper
rice crops are attributed to the
killing of sixteen million or more
rats.
New crop varieties will be intro-
duced widely Loans will be made
to over a tiousand poor fishing
families to r.ermit them to motor-
ize their sampans and projects for
the improvement of nets and fish
landing facilities will be continued
and expanded.

U

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World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
BERLIN - The West Berlin
branch of Soviet Intburist was
wrecked by a mysterious blast
yesterday some five hours after
closing time.
* * *
WINNIPEG - Canadian Prime
Minister John Diefenbaker said
yesterday negotiations with the
United States are continuing on
an intermittent basis to have nu-
clear warheads made available to
Canada in an international emer-
gency or war. Ie repeated, how-
ever, that the government does not
intend to have nuclear weapons
stored in Canada during peace-
time.
BATON ROUGE-United States
District Judge E. Gordon West or-
dered the east Baton Rouge parish
school board yesterday to submit
by July 5 a detailed plan for or-
derly desegregation of p u b 1 i c
schools. An original desegregation
order had been issued by the fed-
eral courts two years ago, but no
deadline was set then.
* .. ,
CHICAGO-National Broadcast-
ing Co. board chairman Robert W.
Sarnoff said yesterday a study
will be made to determine the best
format for television debates be-
tween the 1964 presidential candi-
dates. Sarnofi told the 26th Chi-
cago World Trade Conference that
NBC had made a grant for this
purpose to the American Political
Science Association.
LONDON-The British govern-
ment said yesterday French ex-
premier Georges Bidault, arch foe
of French President Charles de
Gaulle, entered Britain in secret

and illegally, but is now believed
to have left the country.
* * *
ST. PAUL-Karl Rolvaag, the
Democratic candidate, continued
in the lead by 74 votes yesterday
as the special three-judge court
prepared to start the final phase
of the Minnesota governor recount
case.
* * *
NEW YORK-The Stock Mar-
ket remained near yesterday's
levels in the quietest trading since
the start of the year. The Dow-
Jones averages showed industrials
up 0.12, rails down 0.86, utilities up
0.06 and 65 stocks down 0.5.

DAVE JA
B at
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SPRING WEEKEND '63
Ottt Weit
will include:.
COVERED WAGONS with scenes depicting "Michigan, Champions of the
West."
GAMBLING CASINOS in the IM building, competing for profits during
the all-campus dance.
CANOE RACES and crowds cheering backers ashore at Island Park.
WAGON RACES over a wild West obstacle course, with man power and
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