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March 05, 1963 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SDAY, MARC'

'opulation Persists Moving
[oward West Coast Areas

Report Suggests Membership Judge

By BARBARA PASH
For the past decade the trend
n population movement has been
o the West coast, Prof. Ronald
Freedman of the sociology depart-
nent and research associate of the
Survey Research Center declared.
"Although nobody can say with
certainty why people go West, with
he data available we can ascer-
,ain two important factors: eco-
nomic opportunities plus an at-
ractive physical environment," he
continued.
Many large complexes of space

and airplane agencies have moved
to such states as California and
Arizona. A large majority of sci-j
entific personnel and semi-skilled
workers have followed this change
in location.
'More People
"Every state in the West has in-
creased in population consider-
ably. However, the movement West
has been continuous since before
the Civil War," Prof. Freedman
noted.
The region as a whole has in-
creased its population 39 per cent
(7.9 million) since 1950. The South
increased 16.5 per cent, mainly be-
cause of Florida and Texas. Sev-
eral Southern states actually lost
in population. The North Central
area gained 16.6 per cent in pop-
ulation and there was a 13.2 per
cent increase in the Northeast.
The rate of growth in the West.
has been higher than any other
area since 1850. From 1850-1860
there was a 246 per cent increase
in California, which has gained 5.2
million in the last decade.
"This figure is considerably
larger than the total population of
some other states," he commented.
Problems Raised
He noted tlat one of the diffi-
culties caused by the influx is a
need for capital investment and
new facilities quickly. This precipi-
tates a money problem. "The in-
crease in population will pay for
the construction of urban facili-
ties in the long run, but the areas
are still faced with the problem of
financing these improvements in
the short run," he said..
Many of the difficulties facing
Western states are not exclusively
their own. For example, many oth-
er states also have water problems.
But the large increase in popula-
tion coupled with an initially low
water supply have exaggerated
these problems in the West.
"It is also difficult to plan ra-
tionally when there is such a flux
in the population. Whole new com-
munities are being built," Prof.
Freedman concluded.
Hay den, Thomas
To Lead Forum
Thomas Hayden, Grad, and
Prof. Norman Thomas of the poli-
tical science department will dis-
cuss "Politics and Realignment" in
the fifth of the Voice Forum se-
ries on American Society at 8 p.m.
tonight in the Multipurpose room'
of the UGLI.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is the text of a draft of a Regental
resolution involving Student Gov-
ernment Council implementation of
Regents Bylaw 2.14 in the area of
membership selection by student
organizations. The draft was pre-
pared by Prof. Robert J. Harris of
the Law School and it will be dis-
c ssel by SGC Wednesday night.
'he Regents are expected to act on
the resolution at their March 22
meeting.)
Whereas questions have arisen
concerning the way Student Gov-
ernment Council should imple-
ment the policy of nondiscrimina-
tion set forth in Section 2.14 of
the Regents Bylaws,
Now, therefore, be it resolved as
follows:
Membership Rules
1. Student Government Coun-
cil shall make rules implementing
Section 2.15 as it pertains to rec-
ognized student groups. These
rules shall be known as member-
ship rules. To the extent it finds
necessary in order to implement
Section 2.15 Student Government
Council may include in such rules
provisions assuring to the stu-
dent members of the local chapter
of a recognized student group au-
tonomy in membership decisions.
2. In adopting these rules SGC
shall be guided by these policies:
(a) Section 2.14 is to be imple-
mented with all deliberate speed
consistent with fair notice and
hearing for adversely affected rec-
ognized student groups; (b) to the
extent reasonably compatible with
the above notion, freedom of asso-
ciation shall be preserved; (c) to
the extent reasonablly compatible
with the above notions, confiden-
tiality of the secrets of recog-
nized student groups shall be pre-
served.
Membership Judge
3. There shall me a membership
judge, selected by SGC for a two-
year term from among persons
with an L.L.B. degree who are
connected with the University,
alumni being deemed to, be con-
nected for this purpose. If a va-
cancy occurs or if the judge dis-
qualifies himself from a case an
interim Judge shall be designated
in similar fashion.
4. The membership judge shall
havethe power to impose appro-
priate sanctions upon recognized
student groups found in violation
of rules promulgated by SGC pur-
suant to this resolution. No sanc-
tion shall be imposed except after
fair notice and hearing pursuant
to the rules of procedure described
in Section 9 of this resolution. The
possible sanctions include, but are
not limited to, withdrawal of rec-

ognition of the group. In the event
the judge orders withdrawal of
recognition and his order is not
reversed on appeal, SGC shall)
withdraw recognition.
Membership Committee
and General Counsel
5. SGC shall create an appro-
priate agency, called the mem-
bership committee, which shall
perform these functions:
(a) bring before the member-
ship judge cases involving alleged
violations of rules promulgated
pursuant to this resolution;
(b) prosecute such cases, in-
cluding pretrial phases and ap-'
peals from the membership judge;
(c) seek, receive, and process
information pursuant to section 8
of this resolution;
(d) seek, receive, and process
the complaints of persons who al-
lege the existence of violations of
the membership rules, provided
that nothing in this resolution is
to be read as limiting the power
of the membership committee to
initiate proceedings in the ab-
sence of any complaint from a
person outside the committee;
(e) promulgate procedural rules
for itself, not inconsistent with
those of SGC;
(f) seek to implement the poli-
cies of this resolution by concilia-
tion, where,rin its judgment, that
is feasible;
(g) do such other things as are
necessary and proper to implement
the above enumerated powers.
6. The membership committee
shall engage as its general coun-
sel a personhconnected with the
University who has had substan-
tial litigation experience. Alumni
are deemed to be connected for
these purposes.
7. The general counsel shall be
selected by the membership com-
mittee, shall prosecute such cases
as that committee turns over to
him for prosecution, and shall
have no power to dismiss a case
by stipulation with the recognized
student group affected. However,
once a case has been turned over
to general counsel for prosecu-
tion the membership: committee
shall have no further power over
the conduct of the litigation, ex-
cept to decide whether or not an
appeal'should be taken.
Information Rules
8. SGC shall promulgate infor-
mation rules, pursuant to the cri-
teria described in Section 2 above.
These rules will prescribe the duty
of recognized student groups to
furnish to membership committee

information, (whether confiden-
tial or not), which might be rele-
vant in deciding whether or not
there has been a violation of the
membership rules and what should
be done about it.
Procedural Rules
9. SGC shall promulgate pro-
cedural rules governing the pro-
cedures for implementing the in-
formation rules and membership
rules. The Committee on Referral
shall regulate its own procedures
governing appeals.
Appeals
10. Any party to proceedings be-
fore the membership judge may
appeal from that judge's final de-
cision to the Vice-President for
Student Affairs. The Vice-Presi-
dent for Student Affairs with the
advice of the Committee on Refer-
ral, shall review the decision of the
membership judge to determine
whether (a) all crucial and chal-'
lenged findings of fact are sup-
ported by substantial evidences
in the record below; and (b) there
was any prejudicial error com-
mitted by the membership judge
in his interpretation or application
of rules promulgated pursuant to
this resolution. The membership
judge's decision as to the appro-
priate sanction to be imposed shall
not be disturbed unless found to
be capricious.
In the event reversible error is
found, the Vice-President for Stu-
dent Affairs shall enter an appro-
priate order, which may be, but
need not be, a remand for further
proceedings before the member-
ship judge. In the event he re-
verses the membership judge, the
Vice-President for Student Affairs
shall accompany his order with a
published opinion.
Recognized Student
Groups Defined
11. In this resolution "recognized
student group" shall include any
group (a) containing a significant
number of members who are stu-
dents at the University; and (b)
enjoying the benefits of recogni-
tion by the University; and (c)
not falling within one of the ex-
empt categories created by SGC.
In creating exempt categories SGC
shall make rational rules, taking
into account the policies stated in
Section 2 and notions of adminis-
trative efficiency.
Student Government
Council Plan
12. All actions taken by SGC
pursuant to this resolution shall

conform to the procedures desig-
nated in the Student Government
Council Plan, as amended from
time to time. Such actions shall be
subject to veto by the Vice-Presi-
dent for Student Affairs in the
fashion prescribed in that plan;
however, review of the decisions of
the membership judge pursuant to
Section 10 of this resolution shall
not be governed by the provisions
of that plan.
Amendment
13. Unless otherwise specified by
the Regents, SGC upon two-thirds
vote may recommend modifica-
tions of this resolution to the Re-
gents.
Effective Date
14. This' resolution is effective
at once.

S.
Li1
~~' '. \

A gift of
ROYAL HOLLAND
PEWTER is one
which will please anyone.
When you send your
next gift, consider
this' beautiful present.
JOHN B. LEIDY

Phone NO 8-6779

0 601 East Liberty

RONALD FREEDMAN
westward-ho
FORM-
To Discuss
Past Work
Internationally known architect,
Marcel L. Breuer, will present a
lecture on "Matter and Intrinsic
Form" at 8 p.m. Wednesday in the
Rackham Lecture Hall.
Formerly a member of the Har-
vard faculty, Breuer has taught-at
a number of institutions as visit-
ing critic.
A photographic exhibition of his
work will be shown at the Museum
of Art in Alumni Memorial Hall
through March 17. It will include a
survey of his professional work,
with. particular emphasis on re-
cent buildings, notably St. John's
Abbey, the University at College-
ville, Minn. and the IBM Center at
La Gaude, France.

OPENING
TONIGHT

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, DEPT. OF SPEECH present
OPERA DEPT., SCHOOL OF MUSIC in
a great comic opera in English
The Hunter's
("Der Wildschutz") by Albert Lortzing,
the one-man Gilbert & Sullivan of Germany
with Prof. Ralph Herbert
of the Metropolitan Opera,
TONIGHT THRU THURS.-$1.75, 1.25 FRI. & SAT.-$2.00, 1.50
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre box office open 12:30-8:00 daily
CURTAIN-8:00 SHARP
Latecomers seated after overture and during intormissions only

I'

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i

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to

Room 3564 Administration Building
before t p.m. two\ days preceding
publication.
TUESDAY, MARCH 5
Day Calendar
8:00 p.m.-Dept. of Speech Univ. Play-
ers, School of Music Opera Dept., and
Dept. of Physical Education for Women
Dance- Area Opera-Albert Lortzing's
"The Hunters" (Der Wildschutz): Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.

I

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

THE STUDENT ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
and B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
invite you to a
KU-MSITZ
(get-together)
Continuing our weekly series of instruction in
"ISRAEL'S DANCES and SONGS"
Refreshments Thursday, Feb. 28 . . . 7:30 P.M.
HILLEL FOUNDATION ... 1429 Hill Street

French and German Screening Exams:
The screening exams in French and
German for doctoral candidates will be
administered today from 7 to 9 p.m. in
the W. Lecture Rm. of the W. Ph*sics
Bldg. Doctoral' candidates must pass
the screening exam before taking the
written test in French or German."
,Mathematics Colloquium: Meets to-
day at 4:00 p.m. in Rm. 311 W. Engrg.
Prof. Paul R. Halmos, Univ. of Mich.,
will speak on "Numerical Ranges and
Normal Dilations." -
Refreshments will be served in Bm.
350 W. Engrg. at 3:30 p.m.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored ac-
tivities becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be with-
held until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Elections Comm. of SGC, Poll workers
meeting, March 12; 7:30-9:00, Aud. A,
Angell Hall.
Women's League Bridge and Dance
Lessons, Bridge:every Tues. (8 wks.)
7:00-9:00 p.m., Dance: Tues. Wed. (8
wks.) 7:00-9:30 p.m., League.
African Student Union, Panel Dis-
cussion on Pan-Africanism, March 6,
8:00 pm., Union 30.
Young ;Republicans, Membership
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Chess Club, Meeting, March 6, 7:30
p.m., Union, Rooms 3K-L. Everyone
welcome.
* * *
Deutscher Verein, Kaffee Stunde,
March 6, 2-4 p.m., 4072 FB.
ISA, March 6, Luncheon discussion,
International Center, 12-1 p.m. James
Randall discusses "Race Relations and
Civil Rights."
U of M Physical Therapy Club, Meet-
ing, March 5, 7 p.m., Beal Residence.
Speaker, Miss Spelbring, R.O.T.
** *

Drive, March 5-6, 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.,
Fishbowl.
Voice, Table in Fishbowl, Wed., Thurs.
& Fri. until March 14, all day, Fishbowl.
Seventh-Day Adventists Student As-
soc., Lecture by Dr. F. E. J. Harder,
March 9, 4:00, 528D SAB.
General Notices
Awards Under the Fuibright-Hays Act
for University Lecturing and Advanced
Research have been announced for 1964-
65 in Australia, New Zealand and Latin
America. Those applying must be U.S.
citizens; for lecturing, a minimum of
one year of college teaching experience;
for research, a doctoral degree or reco-
nized professional standing; in certain
cases, a knowledge of the language of
the host country. Application forms
may be obtained from the Conference
Board of Assoc. Research Councils, Com-
mittee on International Exchange of
Persons, 2101 Constitution Ave., Wash-

I
ington 25, D.C. Further Information may
be obtained at the Fellowship Office,
Rm. 110, Grad School. Deadline for fil-
ing an application is April )5, 1963.
The Southeast Asia Treaty Organiza-
tion Research Fellowship Program has
been announced for 1963-64. A limited
number of advanced research fellow-
(Continued on Page 4)

Dial 2-6264

I

f

.e ,/

Shows at 1:00-2:55-5:00
7:05 and 9:18
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS!
including

BEST
* BEST
* BEST

ACTOR
ACRTESS
SONG

.....

rc,;,v, MICHIGINA

Dial 5-6290

N-"

That preposterous professor is on the loose again!
s. *

GERMANY...
for study's sake
Das Deutsche Jahr at the Uni-
versity of Freiburg. Maximum
immersion in a great university
under renowned professors. For
juniors only. Includes diverse
curricula in history, political sci-
ence, philosophy and language;
tutorials, intensive German, res.
idence with German families or
in student homes, field study,
ocean passages. Cost $2,125.
Two years of college German
and B average required.
Other programs in Paris and
Vienna. For more information
on all programs, write (giving
name of your college and year
in school) to:
The Institute
of European Studies
Admissions Office
35 E. Wacker Drive . Chicago 1, I.

IT lS DIFFERENT.ITIS DARING.
MOST OFALLIN ITS OWN TERRI-
FYING WAY.IT IS A LOVE STORY.

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Graduating Ph.D's, MS's, BSEE's

M1 MAMURRY eoOL9ON

near

..

Exceptional
opportunities
with

SYLVANIA

SAN FRANCISCO

J1CK Len111 On
and 100 RemiCK
"®a1YS OF wine
ann Roses,,y
A MlIN MANUUS Production btJP MlFR
.aB AE EDWARDS PaIWARNER BROS
leMastroianni should get
the Academy Award
for best acting"
-N.Y. Times

Sylvania Mountain View, 40 minutes south of San Francisco,
offers you challenging scientific work on defense systems,
plus ideal living conditions.
The work involves systems studies, design and development
in frequency ranges from DC to daylight; it offers growth
into scientific or management positions of responsibility.
Immediate openings exist in the following fields:
Operations Research
.Systems Analysis, Design
Design and Development of
Antennas, Receivers, Transmitters,
Transceivers, Servos
Analog Computers
Mechanical Design
Field Engineering
Sophisticated San Francisco's theatres, restaurants and ma;o&
league sports are minutes away. The Pacific Ocean is near;
hunting, fishing and skiing 3 hours' drive.
Furthering your education? Sylvania encourages, sponsors
graduate study at Stanford and other nearby institutions.
See your Placement Officer now to talk with Sylvania's representative
AN CAMPUS. AMARCH I1A

Shows at 1,,3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
Feature 15 min. ; later

Matinees 65c Voice Political Party, March 5, 8 p.m.,
Nights and Sundays 90c Multipurpose Room, UGLI. Thomas
Children 50c Hayden and Dr. Norman Thomas speak-
Childrn 50cing on "Politics and Realignment."
s* s
Wesley Foundation, Study Class,
NG FRIDAY March 5 at 7 p.m., Wesley Lounge and
I Robe Apt.
ND H EAD'' Wesley Foundation, Holy Communion,
March 6 at 7 a.m., Chapel.

...

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Dial 8-6416

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STARTI N
"DIAMO~

ENDING WEDNESDAY

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."41 . . . . . .

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Th
for

GOLD BARS & BRAID
pegengt5

MASTRQIANNI
ould get
e Academy Award
r Best Acting .
A-Time i .
JOSEPH E LO~NE
MARCU.* I

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4K'

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