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March 03, 1963 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1963-03-03

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* 4

TWO

TH MICHIa G ==ANr a DSia I S.

11Ti f iM llliy[il . /HUAINf.
nfl IT T - . - I I Y

SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 1963

i

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ART AND LETTERS:
Challis Revives Harpsichord
By JEFFREY K. CHASE}
Special To The Daily

DETROIT - "Because no true
artist wants to know that his
product will deteriorate, he must
strive to seek out and create with
the most permanent materials at
his disposal," John Challis, harp-
sichord and clavichord developer
and builder, emphasized.
"My pride of workmanship will
not permit me to conceive of
building an instrument that won't
last.'
In 1890 in England, Arnold Dol-
metsch instigated a revival of 17th
and 18th century instruments. At
h i s harpsichord performances.
throughout the world, the aud-
iences, being almost totally unf a
miliar with the instrument, found
its tone to be quite a novelty.
'Then, with the advent of' the
phonograph record and Wanda
Landowska's harpsichord record-
ings, the public grew to like this
strange "new" sound. People be-
came desirous of obtaining harp-
sichords of their own.

--Daily-Jeffrey K. Chase
HARPSICHORD MAKER-John Challis demonstrates one of the
modern harpsichords he designs and builds. New construction
techniques which he employs have helped to solve problems which
plagued the classic instrument and have given it new popularity.

Program
Notes
Prof. Donald Hall and Philip
D. Church of the English depart-
ment and Edwin G. Burrows, di-
rector of the University's radio
station WUOM, will present a
poetry reading at 2 p.m. today at
a local tavern, 117 E. Washington.
Trombones *. -
Trombone majors of the music
school will play pieces by Mozart,
Beethoven, Speer, Muller, Bozza,
McKay, Mueller, Tomasi, Bassett,
Jacob, Ameller and Phillips at
4:15 p.m. today in Lane Hall Aud.
Folk Songs . ..
Folklore and ballads by Will
Geer and other actors of the Asso-
ciation of Producing Artists will
be presented at 8 p.m. tonight at
the First Unitarian Church.
Recital . .
Cellist Jerome Jelinek a n d
pianist Rhea Kish will present
Beethoven, Brahms, Hindemith
and Francoeur works at 8:30 p.m.
today in Aud. A.
Comic Opera ...
Albert Lortzing's comic opera,
"The Hunters," will appear at 8
p.m. Tuesday-Saturday in Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. The music
school, University Players and the
women's physical education de-
partment will present the 19th-
century German musical.
Piano Concerts ...
Prof. Gyorgy Sandor of the
music school will present Rach-
maninoff's "Piano Concerto No. 3
in D minor" with the Kalamazoo
Symphony Orchestra at 8:30 p.m.
Tuesday in the Kalamazoo cen-
tral High School Aud.
Thomas To Speak
On Choice Criteria
IProf. Edwin J. Thomas of the
departments of social work and
psychology will speak on "Criteria
for Selecting Knowledge from Be-l
havioral Science for Use in Social
Practice" at noon tomorrow in
the fourth floor lounge of the1
Frieze Bldg.

BACKSTAGE:
Star Considers Career,
Current Theatre Trends

By DEBORAH BEATTIE
Describing the path that led
her towards becoming a gold
medalist of London's Royal Aca-
demy of Dramatic Arts and a
leading member of the Associa-
tion of Producing Artists. Rose-
mary Harris explained that she
always wanted to act, even when
she was too young to know what
the theatre was.
Wearing a black pea-jacket over
a black sweater and skirt, with a
black scarf draped over her head,

FORESTERS CLUB ANNUAL
1Paul Buyan Ball
I NFORMAL

Sensitive Materials
Up to that time, however, harp-
sichords were always made of
wood, a material extremely sensi-
tive to weather conditions; a tem-
perature and/or humidity change,
and the instrument would be out
of tune.
In the 18th century, when re-
citals were given in drawing rooms
of private homes, it was only
necessary for an instrument to
produce a soft tone. Today, with
recitals given in large concert
halls, a more powerful sound is
required.
"It is to these two challenges
that I have devoted 32 years of
my life," Challis stated.
"In 1930 when I opened my first
shop, in Ypsilanti (he and his
four assistants now work ;in De-
troit), there were two attitudes
toward harpsichord construction.
The first maintained that it had
been perfected by the end of the
18th century; the second insisted
that for 'a successful revival of
the harpsichord, its construction
must be modernized without dis-
tracting from the characteristic
tone of the instrument. I sided
with the latter.
"My first victim was the wood-
en tuning pin block which, as the
weather varies, cracks from ex-
pansion and contraction. After
much experimentation I discover-
ed that aluminum is the, best
material for this part. I made the
bearings of phenolic, one of the
oldest of the plastics."
Next, improving the wooden
frame became Challis' project.
Cast aluminum proved to be the
Education Society
Elects Eggertsen
Prof. Claude A. Eggertsen of
the education school has been
elected president of the Compara-
tive Education Society, a national
organization which publishes the
"Comparative Education Journal"
and sponsors fellowships and re-
search activities in developed and
underdeveloped countries.

answer. Following this, he attack-
ed the action. A wooden jack, the
part that holds the pick, shrinks
and swells with temperature
changes. This is serious because
one five-thousandth of an inch
out of adjustment and the string
isn't plucked properly. Hard rub-
ber demonstrated itself to be the
material best suited to the func-
tion of the modern jack.
Deterioration
"The wooden sound board of
a harpsichord, as opposed to that
of a, violin, deteriorates with age.
Thus the task of finding a dif-
ferent material for this part con-
fronted me next. After investigat-
ing the possibilities of plastics
and metals, the latter seemed the
best choice because it transfers
sound waves more rapidly than
wood and doesn't expand and
contract to the degree wood does
in weather changes.
"My first results were horrid as
I had suspected. In 1958, however,
I finally hit upon a formula. I
shall call it my 'witch's brew,'
produced the tone I desired. By
slightly altering the witch's brew
I can make the tone mellow or
brilliant, as a customer may pre-
fer. This sound board, unfortun-
ately, is ten times as expensive
as those made of the best wood,
but I refuse to sacrifice quality
for cost."
The pick, or plectrum, is Chal-
lis' one remaining problem. In the
18th century it was made from
quills of very large flying birds,
but these were unsatisfactory be-
cause they broke in a short time.
Today leather is used. The finest
quality and cut will perhaps last
20 years, but, because leather is
an animal fiber, no two pieces are
alike. Therefore each piece re-
quires individual cutting and
breaking-in like a new pair of
shoes. And, like shoes, leather
plectra become hard from lack of
use and/or dampness. "My present
experimentation seems to indicate
that a plastic of some sort will
be the best replacement."
"When I first began using metal
in my instruments, the purists '

argued that the harpsichord must
be made of wood, as in the 18th
century, to accurately re-create
the keyboard sound of that period.
However, when these objectors
were blindfolded and asked to dif-
ferentiate between an instrument
made of metal and one of wood,
they could not."
Challis, an apprehtice of Dol-
metsch in England on a Dolmet-
sch Foundation Scholarship from
1928 to 1930, considers no instru-
ment ready for delivery until he
has "played it in." This process
helps the strings to stretch and
reveals further minute adjust-
ments necessary in the jacks and
plectra.
"With people constantly frus-
trating themselves to earn more
and more money, they losenthe
happiness of living. By making
only 12-15 instruments a year, I
am happy. And this is the pur-
pose. of my work. Besides, an in-
crease in production would leave
me no time to personally devote
to each instrument. And it is fit-
ting. the jacks and paring the
plectra, a task I do myself, that
differentiates a good harpsichord
from one that is only so-so."

brought her to the University
with the APA.
Siamese Cat
A Siamese cat named Lennie
and a black and tan dachshund
named Speed are currently resid-
ing in Ann Arbor with Miss Har-
ris and her husband, APA Artistic
Director Ellis Rabb.
Miss Harris is accustomed to
traveling with pets, because there
were always many of them in her
family. She remembers in par-
ticular having a mongoose and
two ancient parrots inherited
from a grandmother.
Theatre Trends
Discussing the trend of Ameri-
can theatre, Miss Harris said that
it is very definitely moving out of
New York. "New York will al-
ways have the commercial the-
atre, but audiences are becom-
ing more and more interested in
classical repertoire companies."
She does not find playing be-
fore a New York audience much
different than playing in Ann
Arbor. "The atmosphere is quite
different, butathe audiencesare
the same. However, when doing a
play in New York one feels part
of a business trade with a pro-
duct to sell," she said.
Miss Harris believes that the
commercial theatre has too often
misjudged the taste of the Ameri-
can audience. "The theatre either
must bring the audience to a high
level or bring the play down to
a low level," she said.
Pleasant Transition
The transition from Broadway
to APA was a pleasant one for
her because it returned her to
repertory theatre which was the
kind she had been used to in
England.
"When you perform on Broad-
way you don't belong to anybody
or anything. There are too many
artificial strains attached to
Broadway. There is no sense of
increasing purpose which every-
one's life should should have,"
she explained.
"The APA is conscious of build-
ing a continuum. Putting on a
good production is far more im-
portant than personal accolades
or higher salaries," Miss Harris
said.

"

0 Entertainment 10-1 1
Foresters Club Jug Band
Natural Resources Trio
Sawing Contest
Group Singing
* The Malemute Saloon with Dow Baxter
at the Piano
0 Displays
UNION BALLROOM
Sat. March 9 $2.25 per couple

:

.....

1

Continuous Saturday and
Sunday from 1 p.m.

Square Dancing with Dean Parker 8-9

ROSEMARY HARRIS
. . . gold medals

Ballroom Dancing with Ray
9-10,11-12 )

Loius Orch.

the Rosemary Harris who discuss-
ed her attachment to animals, her
life and goals in the theatre and
the role of the APA presented a
striking contrast to the Rose-
mary Harris -who appeared as the
Fairy Queen in "A Midsummer
Night's Dream" dressed in a
filmy pastel gown with luminous
blue angel hair swept over her
forehead.'
She had once planned on be-
coming a nurse and then a physi-
cal therapist, but before these
goals were realized the time came
when she was forced to support
herself. She abandoned her plans,
won a scholarship for the Royal
Academy of Dramatic Arts and
thus embarked on a career in
d r a n a t i c s which ultimately

I

Dial 8-6416
3NOMINATED FOR
ACADEMY AWAR DS
BEST ACTOR
BEST DIRECTION
BEST ORIGINAL STORY
Sizzling farce! Deliciously ingenious,
grandly diabolic! A film that will
go down as one of the great comedies!
Mastrolanni staggers us with a droll
performance that is nothing short of

"',
sh
Th
fo

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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MASTROI AN NI
ould get
he Academy Award
r Best Acting!"
-Time
JOSEPH E.LEVINE.
MARCELLO.
Mastrolanni

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which the
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.
SUNDAY, MARCH 3
Day Calendar
4:15 p.m.-School of Music Student
Recital of Trombone Majors-Lane Hall
Aud.
3:00 and 8:30 p.m.-Professlonal Thea-
tre Program Shakespeare Festival-As-
soc. of Producing Artists Resident Com-
pany of the U-M in "The Tragical His-
tory of King Richard the Second":
Trueblood Aud.
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild-
Alf redo Alcon a-nd Graciela Borges in
Nilsson's "Summerskin"; short, "An
Early Farce": Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Faculty
Recital-Jerome Jelinek, cellist; and
Rhea Kish, pianist: Aud. A, Angell Hall.
General Notices
Awards Under the Fulbright-Hays Act
for University Lecturing and Advanced
Research have been announced for 1964-
65 in Australia, New Zealand and Latin
America. Those applying must be U.S.
c.itizens; for lecturing, a minimum of

NOMINATED FOR 5 ACADEMY AWARDS !
"BEST ACTOR" JACK LEMMON, "BEST ACTRESS"
LEE ,REMICK, "BEST SONG," "BEST ART
DIRECTION," AND "BEST COSTUME DESIGN."
From the
days of wine
and roses

1
E
E
t

one year of college teaching experience;
for research, a doctoral degree or reco-
nized professional standing; in certain
cases, a knowledge of the language of
the host country. Application forms
may be obtained from the Conference
Board of Assoc. Research Councils, Com-
mittee on International Exchange of
Persons, 2101 Constitution Ave., Wash-
ington 25, D.C. Further Information may
be obtained at the Fellowship Office,
Am. 110, Grad School. Deadline for fil-
ing an application is April 15, 1963.
The Southeast Asia Treaty Organiza-
tion Research Fellowship Program has
been announced for 1963-64. A limited
number of advanced research fellow-
ships is offered to candidates from
member states (Australia, France, New
Zealand, Pakistan, the Philippines,
Thailand, the United Kingdom, and the
United States); candidates must be na-
tionals of member state; should plan
to undertake research in SEATO mem-
ber country in Southeast Asia and the
Southwest Pacific. Students working to-
wards advanced degrees are not eligible.
Grant will provide a monthly allow-
ance of $400 and economy-class travel
to and from the country or countries
of research. Grants may be authorized
for periods of four to ten months. For
further information and application
forms write: Conference Board of Assoc.
Research Councils, Committee on In-
ternational Exchange of. Persons, 2101
Constitution Ave., Washington 25, D.C.
Deadline for making application is
April 1, 1963.
Elizabeth Sargent Lee Medical History
Prize: Established in 1939 by bequest of
Prof. Alfred O. Lee. The income from
the bequest is to be awarded to a jun-
ior or senior pre-medical student in
the College of Literature, Science, and
the Arts for writing the best essay on
some topic concerning the history of'
medicine. Freshmen in the Medical
School who are on the Joint Program
in Liberal Arts and Medicine or who
were admitted after their junior year
in LSA are also elegible to compete.
Dean James H. Robertsoh has ap-
pointed the following committee to
judge the contest: Dr. Frank white-
house, Jr., Chairman; Prof. Frank L.
Huntley, and Dr. J. R. G. Gosling.
The essay may be based on any
topic related to the history of medi-

cine. Prospective contestants may con-
sult any of the committee members by
appointment.
1) Prizes of $100, $75, and $50 are
being offered. 2) The manuscript should
.be typed, double spaced, on one side of
the paper only on regular sized manu-
script paper. 3) Manuscripts should be
3,000 to 5,000 words in length. 4) Con-
testants should submit two copies of
their manuscripts, and 5) Manuscripts
should be left at Bm. 1220 Angell Hall
by Map 1.
Events Monday
8:30 p.m.-Center for Japanese Stud-
les and the School of Music Concert-
Karyo Yamahiko VI, Shamisen and
Voice, Japanese Katobushi music: Aud.
A. Angell Hall.
Social Work - Social Science Collo-
quium: On Mon., March 4 Edwin J.
Thomas, Assoc. Prof. of Social Work
and of Psychology, will speak on "Cri-
teria for Selecting Knowledge from Be-
havorial Science for Use in Social
Practice." 12 noon, 4th floor lounge,
Frieze Bldg.

The Women's Research Club will meet
at 8:00 p.m. on Mon., March 4, in the
W. Conference Rm. of the Rackham
Bldg. Miss Esther Goudsmit will speak
on "The Use of Radio Isotopes In
Studying Embryonic Development."
M-809-Approximation Theory Sem-
inar: D. E. Sarason will speak on "A
(Continued on Page 5)

r7

---

The University of Michigan Newman Club
Presents the
CHRISTIAN MARRIAGE SERIES
Sunday, March 3, 7:30 p.m.
"The Natural and Supernatural Aspects of Marriage"
Marriage as a Natural Contract
The Sacrament of Matrimony
REV. JOSEPH WALSH
Chaplain, Wayne State University

Divorce

Italian SjyIe
rftU EAHNC5SEitYAiAWA~RC" $TCOM6Y

Shop at

OVERBECKS

DIAL 5-6290
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
That preposterous professor
is on the loose again!
'' 1 ' :
IYSA
RIAST!

the

MEDICAL BOOK

Store

1216 S. University

finally comes
a night
like this...

1

.'

syc

CINEMA GUILD p~eje t

Wednesday, March 6, 8:00 p.m.
"COURTSHIP AND PREPARATION FOR MARRIAGE"
Dating, Courtship, and Engagement
Church Laws on Marriage, Mixed Marriages
Final Arrangements
Msgr. John F. Bradley
Sunday, March 10, 7:30 p.m.
"PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF MARRIAGE"
Generative Organs, Functions
Place of sex in Marital Life
Dr. John O'Sullivan-Dr. Gena Rose Pahucki
Wednesday, March 13, 8:00 p.m.
"BIRTH CONTROL: MORAL AND IMMORAL"
Sexual Abstinence
Ovulatory Rhythm
Contraception
Msgr. John F. Bradley
Sunday, March 17, 7:30 p.m.
"PHYSICAL ASPECTS OF.M ARRIAGE" (Continued)
Pregnancy and Childbirth
Medical Problems
Dr. John O'Sullivan-Dr. Gena Rose Pahucki
Wednesday, March 20, 8:00p.m.
"PSYCHOLOGICAL ADJUSTMENTS IN MARRIAGE"
Feminine-Masculine Differences
Role of Husband and Wife
Financial Problems
Mr. Peter Dwyder, M.S.W.-Catholic Social Services
Sunday, March 24, 7:30 p.m.
"THE CHRISTIAN HOME"

LAST TIMES TONIGHT at 7 and 9
ANN ARBOR PREMIERE!
LEOPOLDO TORRE NILSSON'S
SUMMERSKIN
starring
Alfredo Alcon-Graciela Borges
"Brooding and Beautiful"-NEWSWEEK
SHORT: AN EARLY FARCE

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