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February 22, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

,c

Jets Strafe
Kenniiedy A

U.S.

Ship;

lerts Units

Takes Aetion
After Cuban
MIGs Fire,
Congressmen Urge
Immediate Pursuit
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy issued shoot-if-neces-
sary orders yesterday in the tense
aftermath of a rocket attack by
Cuban-based MIG fighter planes
on an American shrimp boat in the
Florida Straits.
Kennedy acted while some Con-
gress members angrily asserted
that United States fighter craft
should have destroyed the Soviet-
made jets--even though the fish-
Ing boat, the Ala, and its two-man
crew were not hit. Some of the
legislators even said planes making
such attacks should be pursued
right back to Cuba and destroyed
there.
"Orders have been given to the
armed forces to take all necessary
action against any repetition of
such an attack," a White House
statement noted.
The White House described the
two MIG's which fired rockets
close to the Ala Wednesday as
"Cuban aircraft." Asked if this
meant officials are sure Soviet
planes or pilots were not involved,
Press Secretary Pierre Salinger
refused to elaborate.
Salinger said a strong protest
about Wednesday's incident and a
demand "for a full explanation
from Cuba" have gone to Havana.
The note was sent through Swiss
diplomats, since the united States
has severed relations with Pre-
mier Fidel Castro's Cuba-
However, the Cuban government
denied that its war planes at-
tacked the shrimp boat.
Havana Radio broadcast a com-
munique from the armed forces
ministry which "rejected and de-
nied categorically this new imputa-
tion."
Baltimore Theatre
Begins Integration
By The Associated Press
BALTIMORE-A theatre here
agreed yesterday to integrate ra-
cially if mass demonstrations and
picketing of it would stop im-
mediately. A leader ,of the in-
tegrationist organization involved
agreed, and Judge Anselm Sodaro
t of Baltimore released 413 Negro
and white college students from
jail who had picketed the theatre
in a 6-day campaign.

Governmentl
Sends Plan
To Congress
WASHINGTON VP)-Presidentt
John F. Kennedy put his planst
for health care of the elderly in-1
to new wrappings yesterday: partc
of a $10 billion, five-year plan
aimed to better life, income and
housing for senior citizens. x
But the substance is bound tot
be familiar to Congress. Besides'
the expected and once defeated,X
proposals for hospital insurancet
for the aged through Social Se-
curity, Kennedy asked again for
tax benefits for the elderly, part
of his tax message last month.
The hospital insurance plan ist
expected to cost $5.6 billion fort
the first four years, the tax bene-t
fits $3.9 billion for the first five.1
Hospital Loansi
In addition, however, the Presi-t
dent called for more money for
low interest loans to build rental
hospitals for elderly persons with
moderate income.
He also asked for new emphasis
on building group residences fort
the elderly where central dining
and housekeeping services aret
available and more jobs for those i
past retirement age who want toi
work.
In all, the President recom-
mended 36 ways to better the lot
of senior citizens. But the heartt
of the program was hospital in-
surance. Concurrent with Ken-
nedy's message, the new adminis-
tration bill was to be introduced
in Congress.
New Option
The basic change this year is
an option in benefits for insured'
persons. The prime benefits still
provide for up to 90 days of paid
hospital care after the insured
patient has paid the first $20-90.
As in the earlier bill, the cost
of the medical care would be
borne largely by a boost in Social
Security taxes. It amounts to one-
fourth of one per cent for the
first $5900 of the employee's in-
come.

'P oetlsEase Geneva Demands
By PHILIP SUTIN
The reported confidence of the United States that it can
detect any underground nuclear blast and thus need not press for
on-site inspection is "probably the fruits of three years of research,"
Prof. James T. Wilson of the geology department and acting-director
of the Institute of Science and Technology, claimed yesterday.
According to a report in the Detroit News, this achievement,
not Russian bargaining advantage, has caused the United States
to downgrade its demands for &

on-site inspection. The state de-1
partment, it stated, is now ready.
to reduce its earlier stand of 8-10
on-site inspections a year.
Vela-Uniform Project
The scientific research project
that enabled the United States
to make this reported decision is
the three-year old Vela-Uniform
program in which the University
is an important contributer
through its Acoustics and Seismic
Laboratory.
"There has not been a great
single breakthrough, but three
years of steady research," Prof.
Wilson, director of the labora-
tory, related.
The laboratory has been at-
tempting to devise means for dif-
ferentiating earthquake and other
natural blast waves from under-
ground nuclear explosion waves.
Electronic Detection
It has developed electronic and
optical means of doing this.
The Russians also have been
working in that direction, claim-
ing that its "black boxes" can
detecthnuclear tests without on-
site inspection. Thus far, the So-
viets have refused to share their
scientific data with the West.
Soviet Premier Nikita S. Kbrush-
chev has withdrawn his assertion
that to permit any on-site inspec-
tions at all would amount to
Western espionage. He is now
willing to allow two or three in-
spections per year.
The American position has been
that the number of inspections
necessary depends on the nature
of such inspections.

.irk Students *
In. Bulgaria.
VIENNA QP')-Angered by racial « "
discrimination and unable to1
leave, 300 African students in
Communist Bulgaria are refusing:
to attend classes, an African dip-lodd'e
lomat there said yesterday.
The immediate cause of the stu-
dent strike at Sofia State Univer-
sity is the Bulgarian government's
refusal to pay their transportation 1OS S. UnIv.
to other countries, Ghanaian Am- Ann arbor
bassador Appah Samong said. NO 5-9426
The Bulgarians insist most stu-
dents want to remain.
-U

-AP wirephoto
BASES IN CUBA-This photo, taken by a high altitude reconaissance plane, shows an airbase for
Russian planes in Cuba. It was released by the Department of Defense Oct. 24. The white spots refer
to MIG 21's and MIG 15's. Yesterday the Defense Department announced that the Russian MIG's had
fired rockets over a United States shrimp boat in the Florida Straits.
PREPARING FOR CHINESE:
Nehru To Request Plans from West

Capt
nRECrDSt

NEW DELHI (R)--Indian Primev
Minister Jawaharlal Nehru's gov-
ernment has decided to ask the
United States, Britain, Canada and
Australia to send planes to de-
fend India against any Chinese
Communist air attack.
"It is assumed they will rush
help," Mrs. Lakshmi 'Menon 7Neh-
ru's chief deputy in the fireign
ministry, noted.
Mrs. Menon addressed a meet-
ing of the Congress Party after
Nehru had told Parliament any
Chinese aerial attack supporting a
possible reopening of the border
war, would be met with help from
friendly countries.
New Tactics
American, British, Canadian and
Australian air force officers have
been studying what needs to be
done here to enable modern inter-
ceptor planes to operate over In-
dia if the emergency arose. There
was no aerial warfare during the
Chinese border offensive of last
fall.
Western officials have said the
study was purely technical and
that a political decision had yet
to be made on whether to offer
help.
Major improvements in Indian
air strips, radar and communica-
tions systems are necessary "to
make it possible for the Indian Air
Force to meet any sudden emer-
gency, when it arises, with the
help of friendly countries," Nehru
told Parliament.

I /2

11

ICE

He said the assessment of the
Chinese air threat and India's
needs to deal with it now being
made by the Western officers, have
led to speculation in the press
about the establishment of for-
Urges Meetngs
Of ITU, Papers
For Arbitration
By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-President John
F. Kennedy decried yesterday what
he termed "a lack of good faith"
in negotiations to settle the 75-
day-old New York newspaper strike
and urged both sides to submit
their differences to independent
determination.
Kennedy told his news confer-
ence it was apparent that the In-
ternational Typographical Union
and local President Bertram Pow-
ers "are trying to impose a settle-
ment which may put several news-
papers out of business."
National ITU President Elmer
R. Brown had said earlier that
there would be a possibility of ex-
tending the strike to plants of the
New York Times in Los Angeles
and Paris.
Brown had met with Powers and
other ITU officials in Colorado
Springs to discuss the fact that
New York publishers had tried to
get other newspapers to print their
editions.

eign bases and foreign aircraft
providing an air umbrella.
"There is no question of station-
ing any foreign air force or estab-
lishing any foreign air base in
India," Nehru assured Parliament.
He said that India has two
needs in air defense: to meet any
emergency like the one created by
the Chinese advance last Novem-
ber and to meet a long-term threat
by the Chinese.

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