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February 17, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1963-02-17

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BRUARY 17, 1963

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

S., Britain Set~

U.S.,Britain Set
Atomic Planning
For NATO Force
WASHINGTON (P)-The United States and Britain will begin
working out detailed plans here tomorrow for assignment of air and
sea nuclear striking forces for the North Atlantic Treaty'Organization
in the immediate future.
The two allied powers and a number of others such as Italy and
West Germany are determined to press the NATO nuclear forces
project with maximum speed because of the opposition stand of
French President Charles de Gaulle, who seeks to decrease United
States and British influence in Western Europe.
United States plans call for a three-part nuclear force organiza-
tion under the command of the NATO supreme commander in Europe,

" United States General Lyman L.
Lemnitzer.
Voluntary Participation
The three parts would be a Unit-
ed States-owned and manned force
submitted to 1NATO control, a sim-
ilar British national force, and
an international force jointly paid
for and jointly ,manned by all the
NATO members willing to partici-
pate. These, officials believe, will
certainly include Italy, "West Ger-
many and Belgium.
However, Italian Premier Amin-
tore Fanfani's office denied yes-
terday that he discussed station-
ing United States Polaris sub-
marines in Italy in talks with Pres-
ident John F. Kennedy andt Unit-
ed States Deputy Defense Secre-
tary Roswell Gilpatric.
The denial added to evidence
that tough political hurdles con-
front the United States in its ef-
forts to find a Polaris missile
base in Italy or Spain.

AFL-CIO
To Fight
Shop Bills'
MIAMI BEACH (M)-A renewed
wave of activity in state legisla-
tures aimedat outlawing compul-
sory union shops is troubling la-
bor leaders gathered here for win-
ter meetings.
Wyoming has just become the
20th state to ban the union shop
and one official here declared that
"the drive by enemies of labor
has grown to alarming propor-
tions."
A counter drive to keep other
states from taking similar action
is expected to be mapped by the
AFL-CIO Executive Council in ses-
sions opening here today.
Dispute Clauses
All state legislatures meet this
year and AFL-CIO officials said
moves were under way in 22 states
to prohibit contract clauses re-
quiring employes to join and pay
dues to unions.
A part of labor's counter drive
will be an all-out effort to per-
suade Congress to repeal section
14b of the Taft-Hartley law, which
permits states to enact "right-to-
work" statutes barring union
shops.
If this state option provision
were killed, all existing right-to-
work statutes would automatically
be repealed.
A long, uphill fight will be nec-
essary to amend Taft-Hartley
law, union chiefs admitted, but
they said they expect to win the
fight eventually.
Right-to-Work Fights
Currently, the biggest fights over
right-to-work proposals are rag-
ing in Maine and Oklahoma.
Union shop opponents insist that
no worker should be compelled to
join a union against his will. La-
bor organizations argue that all
workers they represent should be
required to contribute dues sup-
port.
Union leaders say that right-to-
work law campaigns are often un-
dertaken in states to divert or-
ganized labor from activities in
behalf of its other legislative goals.
There are 19 states presently
having right-to-work laws, besides
Wyoming.

DISASTER?
Lausehe, Keyserling Hit
Kennedy Tax-Cut Plan

FRANK LAUSCHE
.. attacks program

CALIFORNIA:
Try To
YR Elec
Of Birc

Stop
tion
Sher'

WASHINGTON ()-A conser-
vative Senate Democrat and a
liberal economist slammed away
at President John F. Kennedy's
tax-cutting program yesterday.
"It might bring disaster," Sen.
Frank Lausche (D-Ohio) said. It's
to small to handle the "giant's
job" that has to be done, Leon H.
Keyserling, former chairman of he
Council of Economic Advisers in
the President Harry Truman ad-
ministration, commented.
The cross-fire of criticism points
up the difficulty the administra-
tion faces in seeking congressional
approval of the program. While it
is radical in Lausche's estimation,
it doesn't go far enough accord-
ing to Keyserling.
No Tax Cut
"There cannot, in my judgment,
in the interest of the country, be.
a tax cut at this time without a
corresponding reduction in ex-
penses.
"There are millions of Ameri-
cans who have bought government
bonds, are receiving annuities and
pensions, have placed money into
bank accounts. You can rob them
and rob them rapidly be setting
into motion a course of inflation
that will have no stoppage," he
explained.
President Kennedy is asking a
$13.6 billion tax cut over the next
three years with changes in special
tax benefits to recoup $3.4 billion.
He has said that if Congress does
not act, the economy "will in-
evitably move into a downturn."
More Liberal Policy
Keyserling, in a statement sub-
mitted to the Senate-House eco-
nomic committee, plugged for a
program of more liberal monetary'
and credit policy, lower interest
rates and large increase in public
outlays.
The President's program "might
produce a short and unhealthy
boom, but would end up again in
stagnation and recession, and a
long-term growth rate not much
better than the dismally low one
of the past decade," Keyserling
noted.
The proposed personal income
tax reduction schedule would in-
crease the disposable personal in-
come of a $3,000 family with two
children by only 2 per cent, he
said.

Seized Ship
Goes South'

4 Test Ban Talks Collapsing

LYMAN LEMNITZER
NATO commander

By TOM OCHILTREE
Associated Press News Editor
GENEVA-The nuclear test ban negotiations teetered yesterday
on the brink of failure after 41 years of diplomatic effort.
The Americans and Russians each offered concessions but they
remained hopelessly divided on the basic problem of on-site inspec-
tions of suspicious earth tremors.
While nothing in diplomacy can be regarded as irreversible, it
is difficult to see how a treaty halting nuclear tests now can be drafted

- that will be acceptable to the
United States and to the Soviet
Union.

CONSTITUTION:
Uige Change,
Of Document
By Sections
By The Associated Press
LANSING-A Democratic plan,
calling for "selective amendment"
of the 1908 state constitution was
unveiled Friday as an alternative
to the proposed new constitution.
Democrats said the proposals-
endorsed by legislators, party lead-
ers and state officials-should go
on the April 1 ballot as an alter-
native to the new document.
The amendments deal with the
protection of individual rights,
state government financial flexi-
bility and the strengthening of
the executive branch.
However, the Democrats offered
no plan to reapportion the Legis-
lature, a key issue in the debate
over the adoption of the proposed
constitution.
Rep. Homer Arnett (R-Kalama-
zoo), chairman of the House Com-
mittee on Constitutional Revision,
declared that the plan "would only
confuse the voters."
Calling the plan "political," Ar-
nett predicted the "plan will go
nowhere."

Representatives To Meet
The new round of United States-
British talks was announced yes-
terday by the State Department.
Asst. Secretary of State William
R. Tyler will head the United
States negotiators, drawn from
the State and Defense Depart-
ments and the Atomic Energy
Commission. Britain will be repre-
sented by Denis A. Greenhill, em-
bassy minister here.
This will be the third of a series
of negotiations held since Kenne-
dy and British Prime Minister
Harold Macmillan met at Nassau
in December. Macmillan agreed
then to scrap plans to arm Brit-
ain's bomber force with the Sky-
bolt missile, which Kennedy 'had
abandoned, and to build instead a
nuclear submarine fleet for which
he will buy Polaris missiles.
Polaris Sales
The announcement yesterday
said the Tyler-Greenhill discus-
sions will cover particularly the
problems involved in "the sale of
Polaris missiles to the British gov-
ernment and the initial assignment
of forces to NATO by both govern-
ments."
The United States subs and the
British jet bombers will giveNATO
a start on nuclear striking power
this spring. Meanwhile, the Unit-
ed States intends to push plans
for training ,of multi-nation units
to man Polaris-armed submarines
to be sold to a combine of West-
err European allies in the name of
NATO in the next few years.

FRESNO (1)-California's GOP
state chairman stepped into a
Young Republican state conven-
tion fight yesterday over the John
Birch Society issue.
Caspar W. Weinberger of San
Francisco did not intervene direct-
ly but he told a news conference
that. election of a Bircher as YR's
president would be unfortunate.
His statement came in the midst
of a frantic campaigning by three
self-styled conservatives to head'
the 13,000-member organization.
One of them, Ronald B. Garver, is
an avowed Birch member.
The outgoing president has at-
tempted to link Garver and Gas-
ton in what he called a move by
Birchers to seize control of the
YR's. Davis, too, contends that the
choice of either of his rivals would,
be a victory for adherents of the
ultra right-wing society.

RIO DE JANEIRO W-)-The hi-
jacked Venezuelan freighter An-
zoategui sailed down the coast of
South America toward northeast
Brazil yesterday.
The Brazilian navy ordered its
warships to seize her if she turn-
ed into a Brazilian port.
A high Brazilian government
source indicated, however, that
pro-Communist Venezuelan gov-
ernment oppositionists command-
ing the Anzoategui would be grant-
ed political asylum in Brazil and
the ship returned to Venezuela.
Spot Ship
A United States Navy patrol
plane sighted the 3,127-ton vessel
shortly after dawn. A Defense De-
partment spokesman said in Wash-
ington the ship's captors had ig-
nored an order from the Navy
plane. to turn about and head for
San Juan, Puerto Rico, United
States territory.
United States Navy planes in-
tercepted the hijacked Venezuelan
freighter Anzoategui yesterday and
fired rockets across its bow in an
effort to make it turn for Puerto
Rico. But the ship's captors re-
fused to change course.
Steering clear of United States
ships and planes guarding the ap-
proaches to Cuba-believed orig-
inally to be the hijacker's destina-
tion-the Anzoategui appeared to
be following the course of Portu-
guese'rebel Capt. Henrique Galvao.
He seized the Portuguese luxury
liner Santa Maria two years ago
to dramatize his opposition to Por-
tugal's Premier Antonio De Oli-
veira Salazar.
+Liberation Movement
The captors of the Anzoategui
have said in several messages they
are members of a guerrilla de-
tachment of the Armed Forces
for National Liberation, a Vene-
zuelan organization engaged in
terrorist activiticsin hopes of up-
setting the liberal, anti-Communist
government of President Romulo
Betancourt.

Almost Successful
Ironically, this disappointing
prospect came to light at the very
moment when it seemed success
was in sight.
The Soviet Union finally accept-
ed the principle of on-site inspec-
tion, but then limited such checks
to two-three a year on Russian
soil. Informants said that figure
is too small ever to be accepted
by the Kennedy administration or
the United States Senate. The
American and British concept of
8-10 such inspections a year seems
to horrify the Russians. That
many checks would funnel spies
into the Soviet Union, they say.
The 8-to-10 figure represents a
scaling down of enforcement ar-
rangements originally insisted
upon by the Americans andnBrit-
ish. At one time the Western side
insisted on 20 on-site inspections.
This was accompanied by a de-
mand for 15 international control
posts in various parts of the Soviet
Union.
Black Boxes
Now the whole international
control post idea has been scrap-
ped in favor of relying on existing
national detection system supple-
mented by 9-10 black boxes-au-
tomatic seismic stations-on Soviet
soil. The Russians will accept only
three black boxes.
The American disarmament
chief, William C. Foster, and the'
British minister of state, Joseph
B. Godber, told the 17-nation dis-
armament conference last week
the Western side has cut its po-
licing requirements to the bone.
A Soviet first deputy foreign
minister, Vassily V. Kuznetsov,
countered by saying the Soviet
Union made a tremendous conces-
sion by agreeing to any on-site in-
spections, since Moscow saw no
reason for such checks.

VASSILY V. KUZNETSOV
... Soviet concessions
VAGRANCY:
Montgomery
Court Drops
Zellner Case
Vagrancy charges have been
dropped in the trial against Rob-
ert Zellner, field secretary for the
Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee, in Montgomery.
The trial grew out of Zellner's
arrest for vagrancy on the cam-
pus of Huntington College Jan. 8.
Additional charges of "false pre-
tenses" were added Jan. 9 while
Zellner was in jail for the original
charge. The Grand Jury will ren-
der a decision on Feb. 19 to deter-
mine whether he is to be indicted
under this charge.
Last year Zellner and Charles
McDew, chairman of SNCC, were
arrested in Louisiana while visit-
ing an imprisoned SNCC member
and charged with vagrancy and
then criminal anarchy. The charg-
es were later dropped.

World News Roundup

TONIGHT at Hillel
RABBI HAROLD D. HAHN, Temple Beth El, Detroit
SUBJECT:
"GOODBYE GOD, I'VE GONE TO COLLEGE"
(Following Supper Club at 6)

WELCOME to the
COPPER KETTLE CAFETERIA
-StateandLiberty -

By The Associated Press
ONTARIO-A violence-punctu-
ated 33-day-old strike of loggers
officially ended here yesterday
after the men voted to go back
to work Monday pending arbitra-
tion of their dispute. Union Presi-
dent Joseph Laforce said he was
unhappy about the terms, which
he said were forced on the men by
the Ontario government.
* * *
VANDENBERG AIR FORCE
BASE-A 103-foot Titan II mis-
sile, most powerful in this na-
tion's arsenal, blew up over the
ocean yesterday in the first West
coast test of the missile and its
bomb-proof silo. "It was a self-
destructicn. The pieces fell into
the ocean," an Air Force spokes-
man said shortly after the blast-
off.
LONDON -- Britain yesterday
withdrew its legation staff from
Yemen after deciding against rec-
ognizing the revolutionary govern-
ment of President Abdullah Al-
Sallal.
Saa' * * *
DAMASCUS-Two more minis-
ters resigned yesterday from the
cabinet of Premier Kahled El
Azem. Deputy Premier Asaad Kou-
rani announced the resignation of
Omar El Khatib, supplies minister
and Dr. Nabil El Tawil, health
minister. Both belong to the ultra-

right Moslem Brotherhood Move-
ment.
* * *
HAVANA-The Cuban govern-
ment charged yesterday that two
Americans and a band of counter-
revolutionaries from the United
States seized two Cuban fishing
boats off the Cuban coast and sail-
ed them toward the United States.

completing two years in service or
being released. A Pentagon spokes-
man said 1000-1500 of the 2500-
man brigade which failed in an
attempt to topple Premier Fidel
Castro's government in 1961 are
expected to volunteer.

In Caracas, the Venezuelan navy
remained silent about its plans for
chasing the Anzoategul. But one
source said two destroyers were
heading full speed toward the fu-
gitive vessel and hoped to intercept
her by noon today.

B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundation

1429 Hill Street
All Are Welcome

* * *
WASHINGTON - Cuban veter-
ans of the Bay of Pigs invasion
will be allowed to enlist in the
United States armed forces, the
Defense Department announced
yesterday. Some will be trained as
officers and all the volunteers will
have the choice after training of

Coming:
A NIGHT
ON THE
WORLD

i

26,000 STUDENTS
3,000 SENIORS
10,000 GRADUATES

..

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and
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also
Catering for Private Parties
Phone: 663-5059
Open Daily from 9-8. . . Sundays from 11 -8

RICHARD E. MOONEY,
Member of the Washington Bureau
of The New York Times
will speak on:
"TAXING AND SPENDING ON THE NEW FRONTIER"

But only 900 Michiganensans left!

Tuesday, February 19
at 3 p.m.

Rackham
Amphitheatre

The Public Is Invited

(This advertisement paid for by the University Press Club of Michigan)

DON'T BE LEFT OUT

,

91

BUY NOW!

NICK LARDAS and JIM BARTZ
formerly of the Golden Butterfly

_1

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THIS WED., FEB. 20
Ends Feb. 23
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