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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1961 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1961-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I+

f _
Adams
Three years ago we introduced a new line
of suiting in our store.,. The Adams.
Since its inception your approval has
been overwhelming. So much so,
that this year our selection is the
most comprehensive ever. The range
of fabrics include Flannel, Worsted, Saxony, §
and Tweed, all faithfully tailored in our
own vested, natural shoulder model. Then,
as now, they represent an excellent value
at . . .§
SEVENTY-FIVE
OPEN MONDAY NIGHTS till 8:30
OXXFORD CLOTHES BURBERRY COATS
ANN ARBOR DETROIT

HARDSHIPS AHEAD:
Corpsmen To Live on Local Level

By The Associated Press
The hardship of living at the
level of the peoples of underde-
veloped nations will be a common
problem for the scattered mem-
bers of the Peace Corps.
First contingents of the corps
this fall begin projects in Ghana
and Tanganyika in Africa, Co-
lumbia and Chile in South Amer-
ica and the Philippines in the Far
East.
In Ghana and the Philippines
the corpsmen's main job will be
teaching English. Corps members
in Chile and Columbia will aid
farmers in developing their land
and those in Tanganyika will help
build roads.
Share Conditions
Their job will not be an easy
one. In each of the countries the
corpsmen will share the food,
housing, and other living condi-
tions of the local populace.
R. Sargent Shriver, director of
the corps, has noted,. "This is not.
going to be a moonlight cruise
on 'the Amazon, or a pleasant va-
cation in Kashmir, or a very nice
opportunity to go out to the Far
East."
In Ghana 52 corpsmen willa
teach English in high shools.
They will receive $75 a month
severance pay.
The group, 32. men and 20
women, have completed an eight
week course at the University of
California And .will receive two1
more weeks of training at Univer-
sity ,College in Ghana.
Secondary Schools
They will teach in Ghana's
secondary schools, supervised by
that country's ministry of educa-
tion and headmasters of their
schools. Aside from English, the
volunteers will teach chemistry,
physics, biology, general science
and French.
In the Philippines, corpsmen al-
so will teach English. The govern-
ment of the Philippines wants
English to become the "second
language" of the people. The main
language is Spanish. It is by no
means widely used at the mo-
ment, despite the many years that
Americans have lived and worked
in the islands.
"We want to improve our Eng-
lish because it is a language of
communication in the world,"
Jose Romero, secretary of edu-
cation, said.
"It is the intention of the peace
corps," a Philippine official says,
"that a volunteer will live on a
standard similar to that of his
counterpart in the host country"
English Instructors
The "counterparts" of the
Americans are the Filipino teach-
ers in the elementary schools.
Provincial supervisors of schools
will assign corpsmen to the towns
and s m al11 barrios (villages):
There, they will work with the
Filipino teachers-largely but not
entirely to help as instructors of
English.
The Filipino teachers in Albay
province, for example, receive a
little over 200 pesos a month in
salary. The Americans will re-
ceive exactly 200 pesos, paid by
the United States government.
"They should be able to get.
along on that," an Albayan said.
The typical house in which
corpsmen will live is something
less than modern. It is a two-story
dwelling with weather - grayed
walls. It has no electricity, no gas,
no water.
In the kitchen, there are clay
vessels and wood fire for cooking.
The rooms are large but nearly
bare of furniture. There are no
screens on the windows. "The wind
from the sea is too strong here
for mosquitoes," an Albayan said.
Community Development
In Colombia, corpsmen will aid
in community development. The

64 volunteers will do work direct-
ed "at the bottom of the social,

political and economic pyramid
where the need is most immedi-
ate and desperate."
The Colombian project is un-
der the direction of the Co-oper-
ative for American Relief Every-
where, Inc. (CARE), a private,
agency which collaborates with
the Colombian government's re-
cently organized community de-
velopment department..
CARE was picked to direct the!
operation because it has been
working with the Colombian gov-
ernment for seven years on sim-
ilar programs in community de-
velopment.
Corpsmen will get $150 a month
for living expenses in Colombia
plus a $75 a month allowance
which will be banked in the Unit-
ed States and available only on
separation. They will get 30 paid
leave days a year.
Difficult Conditions
Despite the Colombian's relaxed
pace of life, the corpsmen will
have their problems. They will be
up against disease, poverty, illit-
eracy, and troubles resulting from
maldistribution of the land, mis-
use of the soil and intervillage
feuds.
In Tanganyika, the corps will
include surveyors, engineers and
geologists. They will make a sur-
vey for a feeder road system
throughout the, country. The
roads will be designed to bring
crops such as cotton and coffee to
market and give African farmers

a chance to exchange their labor
for cash.,
The members of the corps can
look forward to a fascinating, if
not entirely comfortable two
years.
The climate in the coastal areas
is tropical and rumid. There are
about 40 inches of rainfall a year.
On the central plateau of the
country the humidity is less op-
pressive, but the average tempera-
ture is still above 70 degrees. Ma-
laria is prevalent throughout
Tanganyika.
Living Quarters.
In Tanganyika, the corpsmen
are expected to live like civil serv-
ants of the government. They will
not live as the Africans do, but
in most places will have furnished
living quarters. They will get "lo-
cal leave" ranging from 18 to 25
days a year. ..
They will bring their own tools.
While it is no part of their job to

instruct Africans in their work, it
is expected that Africans assign-
ed to help them will benefit from
their know-how.
In Chile the corps will work
with the controversial Institute of
Rural Education. The self help
program of the IER makes it a
natural choice to be among the
agencies to work with the peace
corps.
Some 40 corpsmen will extend
their knowledge of agricultural
techniques, improved housekeep-
ing and nursing practices, engi-
neering skills and health stand-
ards.
Supporters and Doubters
The corps will find some sup-
porters and many doubters. They
will also face additional obstacles,
for the institute is controversial in
Chile. Some American officials at
the embassy gave expressed mis-
givings on that score.

4

C C ME

to .

C Hl U 1RH
40% AB3ESAT H

0i'I

. rF

T. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 North Division
Phone NO 2-4097
UNDAY-
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m. Holy Communion followed by
breakfast at the Canterbury House.
(Morning prayer on first Sunday of
month.)
11' :00 a.m. Morning prayer and sermon
(HolymCommunion on first Sunday 6f
month.)4
7:00 P.M. Evening Prayer
UESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion.
VEDNESDAY-
7:00 a.m. Holy'Communion followed by
breakfast :at the Canterbury House
(over in time for 8:00 classes)
RIDAY-
12:10 p.m. Holy Communion followed by
lunch at the Canterbury House.
VEEKDAYS-
5:15 p.m. Daily evening prayer.
IRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
1 :00 a.m. Sunday Services.
8:00 p.m. Wednesday Services.
9:30 a.m. Sunday School (up to 20 years of
age )
1 :00 a.m. Sunday School (for children 2 to
6 years of age.)
i free reading room is maintained at 306 East
Liberty St. Hours are Monday through Sat-
urday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sundays
and holidays. Monday evening 7:00 to 9:00
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium at Edgwood
John G. Makin
Phone NO 2-2756
0:00 A.M. Bible School
1 :00 A.M. Regular Worship'
6:30 P.M. Evening Worship.
,EDNESDAY-
7:30 P.M. Bible Study
HRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church k rStreet
Pastor: Rev. Alvin Hoksbergen
Aorning Worship: 8:45 and 11:00
unday School: 10:00
vening Worship:7:00
rHE EVANGELICAL UNITED
BRETHREN CHURCH
Corner of Miller and Newport
John G. Swank, Pastor
Telephone NOrmandy 3-4061

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:30 Guild House at 524 hompson
9:30 Study Seminar at Guild House
10:45 Worship
Friday, Sept. 15, 5:45 P.M. Dinner, new stu-
dents guests, at Congregational Church.
Sunday,,Sept. 17, 7:00 P.M. Open House.

0

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alyf red T. Scheips, Pastor
Thomas C. Park, Vicar
Sunday at 9:45 and 1 1:15: Services, with ser-
mon by the pastor, "Straight For The Goal "
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15: Bible study groups
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Club, Supper and Program.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul Light, Campus Minister
Mr. George Pickering, Intern Minister
9:45 A.M. Campus Discussion Class.
11:00 A.M. Morning Worship, "Touching
or Jostling," Mr. Light preaching.
6:00 P.M. Student Fellowship Supper
6:45 P.M. Evening Worship
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, ,Pastor
Miss Anna Lee, Counselor
Phone: NO 8-7622-

Fall was never
more colorful
or more comfortable
Here's a natural shoulder
expression that flatters your
appearance .. . ut with a
priceless extra of uncommonly
good fit and feel.. . a
Saffell & Bush hand-molding
bonus. Here also are all the
natural colors for the season..
new olives, browns, grays
and important new fall blues,
excitingly accented by a
barrage of new fabric
patterns. Enjoy Fall in the
most colorful an comfortable
manner ever. . . in the
Saffell & Bush suiting
of your choice.
There's a "Wonderful
Difference" in the feel of
Sa f fell & Bush Clothes.
Suits 59.50 and up
Sport Coats 37.50 and up
STATE STREET

9:30 and 10:45 A.M. Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 A.M. Church School.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
Friday, Sept. 15, 5:30 P.M. Dinner, new stu-
dents guests, at Congregational Church.
Sunday, Sept. 17,)7:00 P.M. Open House.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
YM-YWCA Building, 5th Ave.
and East Williams
9:30 A.M. Bible Study Groups
10:30 A.M. "A Compact Between God and
Men." Rev. Calvin Malefyt, Preaching.
6:00 P.M. "Snack Supper."
6:30 P.M. "What Can A Student Believe
About Jesus?" Richard Allen, M.I.T., Bos-
ton.
7:30 P.M. "The Gods We Worship." Rev.
Calvin Malefyt, Preaching.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets, Tel. NO 8-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev. Gene Ransom, Campus Minister
September 17, 1961
9:00 and 11:15 A.M. Morning Worship.
"Shall the People Repent?"
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
7:00 'P.M. Worship and Program: LITURGI-
CAL JAZZ, John Wesley's Order for Eve-
ning Prayer.
Wednesdays-
7:00 A.M. Holy Communion Chapel, followed
by breakfast in the Pine Room. (Over in
time for 8:00 classes).
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE:
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M., 12:00
Noon qnd 12:30.
Holyday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M.,
12:00 Noon, 5:10 P.M.
Weekday Masses: 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 A.M. and
12:00 Noon.
Novena Devotions: Mother of Perpetual Help,
Wednesday evenina, 7:30 P.M.

SEE OUR FAMOUS FLOOR DISPLAY
EVERY NIGHT OF THE WEEK

FRIDAY, SEPT. 15
5:30-8:30 P.M.-Open House

..®

9:00
10:00
11:00
6:00
7:00

A.M.
A.M.
A.M.
P.M.
P.M.I

SUNDAY, SEPT. 17
Worship Service
Bible Study
Worship Service
Student Supper
Lutheran Student Association

Meeting. Discussion: "Why A Lutheran
Student Center and Chapel at a
University?"
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor,
10:00 Sunday School. University Student Class.
11:00 Morning Worship "The Power of Christ's
Love."
5:30 Student Guild
7:00 Evening Service "Understanding the
Times."
Open House for new and returning students.
Buffet supper included. September 15-5:45-
8:00.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister
Rev. Edgar Edwards, Student Minister
Guild House at 524 Thompson
Service 9:30, 10:20, and 11:00 a.m., Dr. Fred

JOI N
THE
INTERNATIONAL BROTHER PROGRAM
MICHIGAN MEN:
Here is your opportunity to become an American Brother to an
International Student. You may build a lasting friendship while
helping him adjust to campus life. If you are interested, fill out
this form and send it to International Affairs Committee, Stu-
dent Offices, Michigan Union, Ann Arbor. For additional infor-
mation, call the Michigan Union Student Offices.

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